» Posts Tagged ‘panasonicaf100’

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Up until recently, there wasn’t much competition for PL style lenses at the lower budget level. If you were lucky, some used Super Speeds or Standard Speeds would be a good catch. Now we’ve got brand new cinema lenses from Canon right in this range, the CN-E lenses, and even though they aren’t PL mount, they cross off the other checkboxes in regards to giving you a professional solution. The team over at Magnanimous Media got a hold of the CN-E 24mm T/1.5, 50mm T/1.3, and 85mm T/1.3 primes from Canon, and compared them in a brief, unscientific test against the equivalent still lenses from Canon, the 24mm F/1.4, 50mm F/1.2, and 85mm F/1.2. Click through to watch their results. More »

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When I first saw the announcement this morning I thought I had misread it, as this is something I believe neither I, nor most M43 users expected, but it is indeed true: Panasonic will be releasing an update to their AF100 line, the AF100A (technically AF105A since its initial release will be in Japan only), on November 15th. With a new camera model, this does seem to indicate that they are committed to the AF100 series of cameras for some time. Here’s what we can expect from the new addition to Panasonic’s line of M43 cameras: More »

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[UPDATE: Seems like a mistake on B&H's part about the listing, according to Jan Crittenden Livingston at Panasonic it has not been discontinued. So the rest of this post will just serve as a reminder of my mistake -- though some of the information is still relevant.] It’s been rumored for a while now, but it looks like Panasonic has finally discontinued the AF100. Sluggish sales and better video quality from a cheaper camera (GH2), meant many low-budget filmmakers saved a few bucks and totally disregarded the more expensive sibling altogether. It’s sad news for many who’ve bought into the Panasonic Micro 4/3 video camera system hoping for an upgrade someday, but this may be the end of the road for that product line. So what exactly does this mean for Panasonic? More »

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Own a Panasonic AF100? Need a new monitor for your color suite? If you answered yes to both, Panasonic’s second annual “Shoot It. Share It” competition could be exactly what you’re looking for. Panasonic wants videos under 5 minutes, and the grand prize winner chosen by a panel of judges will take home a sweet 42″ Professional Plasma Display. In the interest of fairness, here’s an AF100 video that meets their criteria but hasn’t been uploaded to the website: More »

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I was waiting for part two to post this, so now that it’s live, here is Philip Bloom’s latest camera shootout pitting the Canon C300, Sony NEX5N, Panasonic AF100, Panasonic GH2, Canon 5D Mark II, Canon 7D, Sony FS100, Sony F3, and Nikon D7000 against each other in a variety of real-world situations: More »

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Philip Bloom, Kessler University, and Documovie.co.uk have conducted a shootout between the Panasonic AF100, Sony F3, and Sony FS100 (with a Canon 5D Mark II thrown in for good measure). As Philip states on his site, this is not meant to be a scientific test, as is the Single-Chip Camera Evaluation being released later this year, but the tests are a good watch for anyone considering these camcorders: More »

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A thread popped up recently on DVXuser that claimed the Panasonic AF100 had a serious design flaw. The sensor would exhibit unacceptable flare when a bright light was pointed into the lens, the post claimed. I can’t like to the thread, as it’s since been deleted — because Panasonic is trying to keep a problem under wraps? Not at all. It was deleted because, in the words of moderator/author Barry Green, it was simply FUD (Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt). So what’s the deal with the sensor flare on the AF100 — and on other cameras as well? More »

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Video gurus Art Adams and Adam Wilt have put the Sony F3 through a suite of proper resolution, aliasing, IR sensitivity, and tonal-scale tests, and compared it with the Panasonic AF100 (now in stock at B&H), RED, and ARRI ALEXA cameras. We’ll have to wait for Zacuto to publish their forthcoming single-chip shootout to get a look at proper real-world comparisons (their DSLR vs film shootout was nominated for an Emmy), but here are the result for the time being. The F3 gets 12 + stops of dynamic range — before upgrading to S-Log, which Sony is claiming offers significantly more dynamic range — which, in this price range, is unprecedented. More from their results: More »

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First of all, just a quick note that the Panasonic AF100 is currently in stock at B&H Photo. It’s been a hard camera to find, as the demand is exceeding the supply — so if you were planning on buying the camera, please use this link to support NFS (at no additional cost to you). With that out of the way, here’s a video from Abel Cine highlighting the new low-cost Sekonic L-308DC light meter, which like all light meters allows one to light by ratios — measuring stops without needing to constantly consult a camera’s waveform or histogram. However, the newly-released 308DC is a third of the price of most light meters, and is specifically designed for DSLR and digital cinematography: More »

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You’d think if one of the largest electronics companies in the world was to release two cameras at the same time — one a pro video camera with a $5k price tag, and the other a consumer still/video hybrid cam that retails for 1/5 of the price — that they’d make sure the more expensive model is better in every way. You’d think. More »

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The Panasonic AF-100 (AF-101 in PAL countries) has been out long enough for the speculation about the camera to be replaced by actual videos (and reviews). We’ve taken a look at some footage from the camera, so now it’s time for a review roundup. To me, here’s the issue with the AF-100: if the camera is to be considered a “true” HDSLR killer, it needs to bring to the table a full complement of real video camera features — and lack any glaring shortcomings — in order to justify its $5k sticker price. Is the AF-100 worth it? More »

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The DSLR Cinematography Guide has several pages addressing lens use and choice. But the new cameras hitting the market — some with relatively new sensor sizes, like the Micro 4/3 Panasonic GH2 and AF100 — bring with them a new set of considerations. On their respective sites, Philip Bloom and Matthew Duclos have addressed the lens options for these cameras. First, here’s Duclos on the high-end F3: More »

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Panasonic has released their first firmware update for the AF100, and while it’s a minor one (fixing some SD card errors), the availability of such a file means that it can be dissected… and possibly hacked. Back in September when previewing the AF100 I asked, “who’s to say that an enterprising hacker won’t find a way to raise the bitrate of the AF100 in-camera, without requiring an external recorder?” Now the programmer behind the original GH1 hack is looking to do just that, deeming the AF100 firmware “definitely” hackable. More »

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Stu Maschwitz has a very interesting post about creating a “Shot You Can Make Simulator” that is essentially a virtual playground in After Effects for simulating different field of view/depth of field/crop factors. More on that in a second — first, on the same topic, Philip Bloom has a video comparing the field of view on the new Panasonic AF100 and Sony F3. As you can see below, the same lens yields a different FOV thanks to the Micro 4/3 crop factor of the AF100 (18.8 x10.6mm), compared to the Super 35 chip in the Sony (23.6 x 13.3mm): More »

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Here’s a brief clip comparing Panasonic’s AF100 (due in December) to the venerable Canon 5D Mark II. The AF100 sports an image that seems flatter and much more rock-solid than the 5D’s, which is more hit-or-miss. But of course the 5D has that (nearly) VistaVision-sized sensor, which has its benefits. There’s no grading on either camera’s footage, take a look: More »

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Philip Bloom got his hands on a pre-production Panasonic AF100 and tested it with a super-fast Leica M 50mm f/1.1 prime lens — and no light sources other than a lit match. Here’s the resulting footage — shot without the aid of an external recorder, going to the AF100′s native 24mbps AVCHD codec: More »

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Ever since the announcement of the Panasonic AF100, I’ve been surprised by the number of commenters who seem to think the AF100′s Micro 4/3 chip is “too small.” In two short years, we’ve apparently gotten so accustomed to a full-frame DSLR that we’ve now unimpressed by a chip that’s several times larger than anything in its price range (in an actual “pro” video camera body). In an attempt to clarify how large the Micro 4/3 sensor is (in which case perhaps they shouldn’t have named it “Micro?”), Panasonic New Zealand has released a video comparing the 4/3 sensor with 35mm motion picture film. There’s just one problem with the video: it’s wrong. More »

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The Panasonic AF100 (otherwise known as the AF101 in PAL countries) is an enticing video camera that’s looking to make DSLR shooters forget about the whole hybrid revolution. It’s made up of a Micro 4/3 sensor in a pro video camera body, complete with XLR audio inputs, numerous lens mount options, and uncompressed HD-SDI output. The first footage from the camera is now available, and it’s a pro clip: shot with a PL adapter and Zeiss Ultra Prime lenses, output through the HD-SDI output at 100 mbs, and recorded in the AVC Intra HD codec to P2 cards. More »

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In 2006, RED announced the RED ONE, their first camera. In 2008, RED announced that the successors to that first camera would fall into two categories: EPIC and SCARLET. EPIC, as the name would suggest, was the big-boy camera for large Hollywood productions, and it was going to carry a matching price tag. SCARLET was for indies and prosumers. They originally targeted the $2,500 price point with the cheapest version of SCARLET, a 2/3″ chip camera with a fixed lens. But then the HDSLR revolution happened. Canon added 24p to their 5d Mark II and, despite the lack of pro audio options and infamous problems like aliasing and compression issues, the idea of SCARLET lost a lot of its sheen. As a result, RED is not abandoning SCARLET wholly, but they are moving it up-market and repositioning it as a “pro” tool — effectively abandoning the prosumer and DSLR market. More »