» Posts Tagged ‘stanleykubrick’

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The Ludvico TechniqueStory is, at its core, a metaphor for how to live. We live vicariously through the characters we see on the page or the screen. So it follows that if you’re creating characters, they should be as real as possible. That is, of course, easier said than done, and a weak or unbelievable character can kill a screenplay or movie regardless of the plot (experimental film excepted). So what can be done? For writers, an understanding of psychology and human nature are vital in order to see people as they are, making it possible to make up people who are more like people than like characters. More »

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The ShiningStanley Kubrick’s films are some of the most analyzed pieces of cinema, especially his horror masterpiece The Shining. Brimming with intrigue, clues, and hidden messages, Kubrick’s 1980 film has been given the royal treatment when it comes to analysis, even becoming the subject of the documentary Room 237 that digs deep into the possible meanings behind the director’s cinematic choices, and Darren Foley of Must See Films offers up another engaging video essay, this time on Kubrick’s enigmatic work, that explores some intriguing theories on the possible theme of “history repeating itself.” More »

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KubrickEven though director Stanley Kubrick has gone down in history as one of the greatest filmmakers in all of cinematic history, he wasn’t what you would call prolific. Being an obsessively meticulous perfectionist, who researched every tiny detail of his films for years before he ever went into production, Kubrick only managed to make 13 feature films in his nearly half century-long career. However, if Kubrick had had it his way, he’d have several more titles to add to his filmography, and this short documentary narrated by Malcolm McDowell explores some of Kubrick’s unrealized films, which overflow with rich design and incredible detail even without ever having made it to the silver screen. More »

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Behind the Scenes from Some of Favourite Movies (1)It’s no secret that we at NFS (primarily me) have an affinity for Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 horror/ chrisangelmindfreak/ familydrama/ paulruddromcom, The Shining, an adaptation of Stephen King’s classic novel and one of the strangest movies ever put out by a major studio in wide release. My second post for NFS was a survey of the exhaustive theories about this movie. Now, for the first time, the major players in the production of the film have come together for an oral history of this masterpiece of modern horror. More »

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kubrick headerMaybe Stanley Kubrick isn’t the first person you’d think of to answer an existential question like why life is worth living — it’s not like his body of work screams (or even really whispers) confidence in humankind. However, he did offer an incredible answer in a 1968 Playboy interview with Eric Nordern, one that has been reproduced in a remarkable comic by Zen Pencils’ Gavin Aung Than that not only illustrates Kubrick’s quote, but tells a story depicting the life of a young man being turned upside down by the legendary director’s work.  More »

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Barry LyndonIt has been fifteen years to the day since one of the greatest filmmakers to ever walk the planet unfortunately departed from it. Stanley Kubrick, who demonstrated his impeccable storytelling abilities in films like 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, The Shining, and many others, died on this day back in 1999, and what better way to acknowledge the empty place the legendary auteur left in the cinematic world after his death than with a celebration of how he managed to give his films such presence during his life. Continue on to watch a video tribute to the late director that shines a light on his brilliant signature themes and cinematic techniques. More »

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Video thumbnail for vimeo video Watch Scenes from 'Fight Club' Without Tyler Durden & 'The Shining' Without Delbert Grady - No Film SchoolIf you haven’t seen David Fincher’s Fight Club, it’s probably a good idea to either watch it right now or stop reading this post immediately. Brad Pitt plays Tyler Durden in the film, and while there are a few glimpses without him in the movie, we’ve got almost a whole scene with his character removed. The creator, Richard Trammell, has also a new video that he just released along the same theme of unreliable narrators, showing a scene from The Shining without Delbert Grady (you should probably watch that one, too, if you haven’t). More »

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kubrickIn early 1965, the New Yorker sent physicist and author Jeremy Bernstein to interview a then 37-year-old Stanley Kubrick at his New York apartment. The piece went so well that in November, Bernstein was dispatched to Oxford, where Kubrick was in production on 2001: A Space Odyssey (then known as Journey Beyond the Stars). Kubrick and Bernstein bonded over chess, and the master director opened up in one of his most wide-ranging interviews. Now, the entire 76-minute Q&A is available online. From a man who gave precious few interviews, this is quite a treat for the Kubrick fan, and covers a wide range of topics, from chess, to nuclear war, and space travel. Continue on to check it out! More »

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The ShiningNow that Halloween is right around the corner, it seems like the perfect time to share some great behind the scenes footage from one of the greatest horror films ever made. Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 horror flick, The Shining, was the illustrious director’s marketable answer to the “too long, too slow” Barry Lyndon – a film that has caught the attention of moviegoers decades after the film’s initial release, and even inspiring conspiracy theorists about the moon landing. Take a glimpse inside the twisted world of The Shining with a 35-minute behind-the-scenes documentary shot on-set by Kubrick’s daughter. More »

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notjustyoumurrayI just wrote about the early documentaries of Stanley Kubrick, and now, in an embarrassment of riches, we have three early student films by Martin Scorsese to look at. Unlike Kubrick, whose first efforts were commercial news reels and industrials, Martin Scorsese was a member of the so-called “film school generation,” attending NYU in the 60s. Filmmaker IQ has posted three of Scorsese’s early student films, and they are instructive viewing for any fan of Scorsese, or student of cinema. Click below to check out these three early works from a master!
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SearfarersBefore he was the master director he would become in a few short years, Stanley Kubrick embodied the essence of indie filmmaking, and at a time when indie filmmaking wasn’t even really a thing. The same year he shot his first feature, Fear and Desirehe filmed the last of the few short documentaries he produced in his early 20s, and now its available to watch on IndieFlix, an independent film viewing and distribution platform. Hit the jump to learn about the master director’s early years and where you can watch The Seafarers. More »

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dr-strangelove-1964Set design is one of the most complicated elements in film. Ideally, it’s meant to serve the story and not call attention to itself, while still adding to the mood of the movie. In the second half of the 20th century, perhaps no set designer has been more influential than Sir Ken Adam: his set design on several James Bond films helped establish a cinematic aesthetic  for the 60s, and his work on Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove cemented his place in cinema history. Kubrick and Adam would later collaborate on Barry Lyndon, for which Adam won an Oscar, and now he’s given an interview to the BBC on his work with the legendary director. More »

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young kubrickThis year, Stanley Kubrick would have turned 85. Since his death in 1999, collaborators and family members have come forward to shed light on the inner workings of one of cinema’s great directors, and the films and directors that he loved and that served as his own film school. The BFI has published a great list of Kubrick’s favorite films, influences, and an interview with his long-time producer Jan Harlan, and it’s required reading for any student of cinema. Click below to see which directors and films influenced one of the greatest directors himself! More »

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Stanley Kubrick lens 50mmf07It’s difficult to talk about Stanley Kubrick without talking about his affinity for top-notch gear. Many admirers of the iconic director traveled to his LACMA exhibit to feast their eyes on the bountiful collection of lenses, cameras, and assorted gear, which he preferred to own than rather than rent. Now, uber-Kubrick fans, steady your hearts and ready your credit cards, because the super fast Zeiss f/0.7 lenses that Kubrick used in Barry Lyndon, capturing those famous scenes lit exclusively by candlelight, are now available to rent along with a modified digital camera fit to handle them . Click below to find out how to get your hands on them. More »

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Slit ScanI’m sure most of us are familiar with the scene in Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey where Dave is flying through the stargate, but have you ever wondered how the filmmakers achieved that trippy effect? Well, today you can obtain this using animation or editing software, but the mechanical special effects technique is called “slit scan”, and John P. Hess from Filmmaker IQ walks us through how to achieve this effect digitally with After Effects, as well as physically with a camera, a mechanized slider, and LEGOs. More »

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Jan HarlandWe can read books, watch their films, and view their biopics, but there’s nothing quite like learning about famed filmmakers from the ones who knew them best. Stanley Kubrick’s right-hand man and brother-in-law, producer Jan Harlan, sat down with the British Film Institute to help compile a dossier of all of Kubrick’s favorite films and viewing habits. Through the interview, though, Harlan reveals much more about Kubrick than a list of Kubrick’s techniques and all-time favorite films. Hit the jump to learn seemingly slight facts about the iconic filmmaker that reveal a great deal about his character as an artist. More »

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Stephen KingWhen we watch a movie, the final product has been filtered through so many minds and visions, and passed around from so many different pairs of hands that, most of the time, it is very different from the original — the version thought up by the writer. What do writers think about the end result of their stories? Stephen King gave his opinion of The Shining 2 years before its release in a 1978 article from Cinefantastique, talking about the direction in which Stanley Kubrick took it in terms of casting and content. Hit the jump the find out what he said. More »

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Stanley Kubrick ExhibitFor those of us who absolutely love Stanley Kubrick, but haven’t been anywhere near the LA area for the past 8 months, we might be pretty disappointed about not being able to go see his exhibit at LACMA (this also goes for all of you Angelenos who couldn’t make it, either.) The exhibit consisted of a vast array of lenses and cameras he used, tons of movie posters, models, props, and costumes from his most iconic films as well as his unfinished ones. Well, never fear, because you can just take the video tour. Take a walk through Kubrickian film history after the jump. More »

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Room 237The documentary Room 237 has been called a “DIY mashup” of the many theories put forward over the years as interpretations of Stanley Kubricks’s 1980 horror classic, The ShiningAnd there is good reason for viewers to puzzle over the film 33 years after its release: The Shining tends to be opaque, even though its corridors are well-lit. I recently found what is arguably the most exhaustive examination of how Kubrick adapted Stephen King’s novel into the script he wrote with Diane Johnson. Click below to read the post and see how Kubrick took King’s novel and made movie history! More »

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Reading through the comments on our post about the innovative new camera stabilizer MōVi, I was reminded of something I saw recently at LACMA’s amazing Stanley Kubrick exhibit. It is a 1976 letter from producer Jan Harlan to Kubrick himself, in which Harlan talks about a new device he’d just discovered: the Steadicam. More »