» Posts Tagged ‘steadicam’

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Long Takes LouieLet’s admit it. We all love long takes. Most of us have watched, and groveled over, the incredible 6-minute take from True Detective that made waves around the internet several months ago. Add to that the numerous other dramatic shows on television that have begun to utilize extremely cinematic long takes, and it’s safe to say that contemporary television has become a haven for long take lovers. However, there’s one show on television that has made the consistent use of the long take an instrumental part of its cinematic repertoire, and it’s probably the show you would least expect. I’m talking, of course, about Louis C.K.’s unassuming FX comedy, Louie. More »

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No Film School at the Tiffen : Steadicam Booth NAB 2014Camera stabilizers of all types and weight capacities are becoming more accessible for everyone, and this year the company that started it all are offering competitively priced solutions for independent filmmakers and GoPro enthusiasts. Click through to watch our interview Tiffen at Steadicam’s 2014 NAB booth: More »

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6 Minute Take HBO's True Detective - No Film SchoolIf you aren’t watching one of the most talked about shows on cable, True Detective, directed entirely by Cary Fukunaga, don’t feel bad (or maybe you should?). Either way, the slow burning anthology series turned up the heat over the weekend with a masterful one take scene that will likely be one of the best you’ll see all year. We’ve got some more information about how it was actually created, but if you haven’t seen it, there is a video of the entire scene (beyond just the one take) below. The scene really doesn’t spoil that much, especially since it’s mostly out of context, but here is your warning either way. More »

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TheMaster_PaulThomasAndersonP.T. Anderson is a director who has worked within the Hollywood system for almost his whole career and yet managed to maintain an independent spirit exemplary of the sort of personal work typified by the best of indie cinema. He is also a director whose style has undergone a dramatic evolution since the relatively recent start of his career. We investigate some of the homages Anderson has paid to some of the greatest directors in cinematic history, like Martin Scorsese, Robert Altman, and Mikhail Kalatozov, as well as his ever-evolving, maturing style. More »

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Video thumbnail for vimeo video Oliver Stone World Cup - No Film SchoolYeah we get it. At this point you’re probably sick of hearing about the MōVI, the newish gyro-stabilized camera gimbal from Freefly. Not only is the $15,000 MōVI M10 not the only game in town, but there are plenty of other affordable options we’ve talked about before – including Freefly’s own M5. While it’s not exactly affordable to everyone, for half the weight capacity, the M5 will be 1/3 the cost at $5,000. Current filmmakers in Hollywood are starting to explore what’s possible with these camera rigs. Oliver Stone recently directed a promo for the World Cup, and he and his DP Rodrigo Prieto tried to put the RED EPIC in places they’ve never put a cinema camera before. More »

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Burton Snowboard MōVI 3-Axis Gimbal Camera StabilizerGyro-stabilized handheld camera gimbals have become all the rage since NAB, with at least a half-dozen companies introducing their own version of the MōVI stabilizer from Freefly (and more everyday jumping on the bandwagon). Not all of these devices are created equal. Even though some of the parts may be relatively inexpensive, that doesn’t mean it’s easy to make them work fluidly, as the programming is a huge part of the performance. Burton Snowboards recently made a one shot promo for an upcoming web series that shows you some of the amazing things that are possible with these devices — like the ability to smoothly hand the camera off to different operators. Check out the video below, including a behind the scenes look at the process: More »

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DEFY G2 Gimbal from Relentless Pre-OrderThe DEFY G2 Gimbal from Relentless is a 3-axis brushless gimbal camera stabilizer that has been in development since NAB 2013 and is capable of carrying cameras up to 2 pounds, like the Panasonic GH2, GH3, and Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Cinema, as well as any other mirrorless or small cameras like those from Sony and Canon. Check out an introduction video below from Drew Janes where he introduces the G2 and answers some questions you might have about the stabilizer: More »

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BeSteady_01Ever since the MōVi stepped on the handheld stabilization scene, we’ve seen an incredible swell of gyro-stabilizers coming on the market. The BeSteady One is one of those, but, not only does it give you incredible stability to get great footage (as you’ll see later,) it won’t empty your bank account — not even close. In fact, it’s one of the least expensive that we’ve seen so far. The 4-person design team, based out of the Canary Islands, has finally wrapped development and is ready to launch a Kickstarter campaign to fund the production of this cheaper and very capable gyro-stabilization option. Check out specs, videos, and prices after the jump. More »

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Video thumbnail for vimeo video More Gyro Camera Stabilizer Goodness: Update on DEFY & the New $4,000 Rotorview from Sweden - nofilmschoolAs we mentioned before, MōVI was just the beginning for gyro-stabilized camera rigs. They are going to come fast and furious (just like the movie) over the next few months and certainly the foreseeable future. We already shared a little but about the DEFY Gimbal, and now we’ve got an update about the device which should be shipping sooner rather than later. We’ve also got a video showing off a new contender, the $4,000 Rotorview 3-axis stabilizer from Sweden, which is already on sale. Check out the products and sample footage below. More »

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Freefly MoVI Gyro StabilizerThey are coming. Gyro-stabilized camera rigs, that is. Some of you are officially not impressed, but that doesn’t mean we aren’t about to be inundated with stabilizers. So what’s the big deal? Should you even care? The answer probably depends on the kind of work you do, but in the next 3-5 years, gyro camera stabilizers like Freefly’s MōVI are going to be as ubiquitous as sliders and jibs. Don’t think so? Read on for more and check out some exclusive footage from NAB 2013 using the MōVI. More »

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Reading through the comments on our post about the innovative new camera stabilizer MōVi, I was reminded of something I saw recently at LACMA’s amazing Stanley Kubrick exhibit. It is a 1976 letter from producer Jan Harlan to Kubrick himself, in which Harlan talks about a new device he’d just discovered: the Steadicam. More »

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Speaking of gyro-stabilizers, it’s very rare that I look at a demo video of new gear with my jaw all the way on the floor, but after watching one for the new handheld stabilizing system called the MōVi, I simply couldn’t help myself. Designed by Freefly Systems, based in Seattle, the MōVi utilizes gyro stabilization and accelerometer technology that, when seen in action, seems less like a mechanism and more like magic. Think of it this way: it’s basically like your handheld rig is now a Steadicam, and pretty much anyone can learn to use it in minutes and get footage that normally would have required years of experience. Sound scary and wonderful? Read on for more. More »

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While you might have already seen the recent video featuring the history of the Steadicam in cinema, today we’ve got a video from Kevin B. Lee — who most recently gave us his best films of 2012 — that gets much more specific, and follows the career of Paul Thomas Anderson and his use of camera stabilizers. Not only does the video focus on specific shots in his films, but it also goes into the psychology of what the shots do (or are trying to do) for the scene in the context of the movies. More »

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While hand-held shooting has basically been around since there was a camera light enough to do so, it’s safe to say that the Steadicam (which is technically a Tiffen name) constitutes a cinematographical revolution all its own. Hand-holding dates back as early as 1911, but it was a long time before cinema gained the dolly’s fluidity of motion coupled with the hand-held operator’s freedom of travel. Audiences would first meet the ‘Steadicam shot’ in 1976′s Bound for Glory, and the first impressions were enough to earn the film an Academy Award for Cinematography. Larry Wright of Refocused Media recently created a supercut called The Art of Steadicam, paying homage to the ground-breaking invention and the artists who helped reshape the possibilities of cinematic movement — check it out below. More »

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There’s a variety of rigs out there for pretty much all your mounting needs — Cinevate and of course Kessler are go-to solutions for jibs running the gamut from heavy-duty to collapsible, respectively. The same goes for shoulder rigs, with options ranging from professional solutions to lightweight prefabs all the way down to homebrew kits. Of course, something that can pull double duty as a portable jib and custom shoulder rig — which you can put together yourself for $50, to boot — may be the best of, like, three worlds. Read on to check out some details — plus info on how to build your own 360 degree panoramic head mount, plus some hardcore DIY stabilizers — all geared toward the low-to-no budget but crafty shooter. More »

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Picosteady Stabilizer iPhone/DSLR/Compact Camera KickstarterWe posted a DIY stabilizer not too long ago that should actually prove to be very capable, but if building your own isn’t something you’re interested in (and you need one specifically designed for a smaller camera), some brothers from Cambridge, MA have come up with their own stabilizer that is specifically designed for that purpose. While it will work well with camera phones like the iPhone and compact cameras, it can also handle smaller mirrorless cameras and DSLRs like the Canon T2i. Check out the intro video below, but if you want a discount you’ll have to hurry ($140 vs. $180 at retail), as the Kickstarter campaign is ending at 6:53pm Eastern. More »

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There are a lot of tutorial videos out there about making DIY camera stabilizers/steadicams, but usually the ones I come across are either made for tiny consumer cameras or the test footage looks ok, but doesn’t quite possess that creamy smooth motion that I come to expect from a good stabilizer. Then I came across a video by Studio Amarelo in Vimeo’s Video School channel that demonstrated a highly adjustable rig that could be built from cheap off the shelf parts, and produced some fantastically smooth footage: More »

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As I’ve said before, if you want a simple, no-nonsense review of a product, Dave Dugdale over at Learning DSLR Video is a good place to start. This time Dave takes a look at the Camera Motion Research Blackbird Stabilizer which is a camera stabilizer similar to the Glidecam and Steadicam Merlin products. Ryan has talked about the Glidecam in the past, but more and more companies have been getting into the camera stabilizer business in the last few years. Check out Dave’s review below. More »

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Among the dozens of booths touting cool gadgets at this weekend’s PhotoPlus Expo was Glidecam, whose camera stabilization devices (otherwise known in popular lexicon as, ahem, Steadicams) are always a hit on show floors. However, while it’s always easy to pick up a pre-configured device and take a few steps with it, the real trick with camera stabilizers is to spend the time to set them up and balance them just right. Because it’s by no means plug-and-play, Cristina Valdivieso from CanonFilmmakers.com has recorded a good how-to video for setting up a Glidecam, step-by-step: More »