» Posts Tagged ‘technology’

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sony curved cmos sensorDigital imaging sensors are traditionally small, flat devices that convert images, which are focused onto the sensor by a lens of some sort, into an electronic signal that can then be processed in numerous ways. With very few exceptions, every digital sensor in use today is flat. However, in a few year’s time, that may not be the case, as Sony’s device manager Kazuichiro Itonaga recently showcased two new curved CMOS sensors, one a 43mm full frame sensor and the other a much smaller 11mm 2/3 size sensor. These new sensors are reportedly up to twice as sensitive as traditional CMOS sensors, and they have the potential to make our lensing systems simpler, faster, and sharper. More »

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William FriedkinOscar-winner William Friedkin, director of The French Connection and the greatest scary movie to ever grace the cinematic world (um — in my opinion), The Exorcist, has quite the reputation in the industry. Friedkin has gone to great, often shocking lengths to capture his vision, including straight up slapping actors across the chops to get a favorable reaction. And though his latest work hasn’t managed to reach the acclaim of his early films, he is still considered to be one of New Hollywood’s big contributors. In this 2012 Fade In Magazine interview, the director draws from his over 50 years of experience in film to share his thoughts on the current state of cinema, as well as the films that influenced him the most. More »

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Prieto C500 WideThe Canon C500 is one of those cameras that hasn’t been readily adopted by the film industry, at least not to the extent of ARRI and RED products. Sure, it played a very small role in the production of Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street, and Shane Hurlbut chose it as his A-Cam on Need For Speed, but for the most part, it doesn’t get much love in the narrative filmmaking world. However, world-class cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto ASC, AMC, (The Wolf of Wall Street, Argo) recently lensed a short film called Human Voice on the high-end Canon camera, and offered his take on why it was the right choice for this project, and how specifically it was set up for this film. More »

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Strahlen Product Shots R3-020

These days, we seem to be at the beginning of an LED lighting revolution, and the future of the technology is certainly bright (dah-dun-chhh). However, the LED lighting solutions that are currently available on the market are either cheaply built, really difficult to modify, or they’re just insanely expensive. Last year, Andy Waplinger, a freelance filmmaker out of San Diego, set out to create the perfect LED light for low-budget and professional filmmakers alike. He created Strahlen, and the company’s first product, the ST-100, a ruggedly simplistic, yet incredibly powerful LED light is now available. I recently talked with Andy about the creation of these lights. Read on to see what Strahlen’s all about. More »

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RED 3 Axis Wireless Lens ControlWhatever your opinion of the company might be, RED makes some absolutely fantastic products. From their line of ever-improving camera systems (which have become fairly ubiquitous in the industry), to the plethora of unique accessories that have been made specifically to augment and enhance their cameras, the folks at RED are never satisfied with the status quo. On Friday, RED introduced a new piece of equipment that is sure to find its way into the hands of many professional filmmakers. Introducing the RED 3-Axis Lens Control System, perhaps one of the most versatile wireless lens controllers ever created. Check out the details below: More »

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Nolab CartridgeThere is no shortage of film cameras on the market these days. From small 8mm and Super 8 cameras to Super 16 and Super 35 film cameras, there are many available for rental or purchase. In a technical sense, these cameras can never truly become obsolete because they are analogue and purely mechanical by nature. There’s only one problem: film is really damn expensive. Not only the stock itself, but the processing and the DI as well. But what if these old mechanical cameras could be repurposed with modern technology in order to create digital images? Well, with the Nolab Digital Super 8 Cartridge, they can. More »

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doctor who twitter trending future of storytellingI recently wrote about new technologies that might be reinventing the form of cinema. However, all these groovy tools focused on one aspect of media: how the individual receives content into their brain (like, in the future, directly.) What about the missing element of cinema that many nofilmschoolers have cited as the best part of the fading theatrical experience: being part of an audience? Two nerds of the highest caliber, Kevin Slavin of the MIT Media Lab, and Kenyatta Cheese of Know Your Meme, have an interesting viewpoint on how looking up hashtags about the Doctor’s TARDIS may actually point you to the real cutting edge technologies of storytelling. (I knew it!) More »

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Total-Recall-1990 arnold brainHere on nofilmschool we’re pretty divided about where we think the future of the theatrical experience is headed. Should we bother saving the popcorn and scratchy seats, or is a decent screen and speaker setup, where you can watch movies in the comfort of your underwear, all we need? In a new installment of Tribeca’s The Future of Film, guest writer Andrei Severny takes a look at new technologies that reinvent the experience of film, and predicts that future theater-going may happen “in your mind.” [Cue Phillip Glass and ethereal AE template.] More »

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VideodromeThis film is not for the faint of heart. Originally titled Network of Blood and Zonekiller, Videodrome (1983) was the meta brain child of writer/director David Cronenberg, and strangely enough, taken from the filmmaker’s own life. The film was rejected by Roger Ebert and viewers at test screenings due to its depictions of sex, violence, and gore, yet is now a celebrated “disturbing techno-surrealist” cult classic. Continue on for an in-depth video of the making of Videodrome, which might be able to answer the film’s own question, “Why would anybody watch a scum show like Videodrome?” More »

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graphene-image-sensor-2Technology is downright crazy. To think that we have affordable digital cinema cameras in the present day that blow away the digital cameras that were being used in Hollywood eight years ago is bordering on absurd. Not only that, but technology is progressing at such a rate that everything is nearly outdated the moment it hits the market. And that trend doesn’t look like it will change any time soon. A team of scientists in Singapore have recently developed a graphene-based sensor that is 1000x more sensitive to light than current CMOS and CCD designs. What does this mean for the photographic and filmmaking industries? Do we really need them? More »

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It’s far too easy to get caught up in the technological aspects of filmmaking, whether it be with new cameras, lenses, NLEs, or anything else. Focusing on gear is easy when something new comes out practically every day, but all of this technology is in place for the purpose of helping us tell better stories. What better way to remind ourselves of this than to see a great story made with what is widely considered to be “less than adequate” equipment? Such is the case with Searching for Sugar Man, the Academy Award winner for Best Feature Documentary at this year’s Oscars, part of which was shot on, as you might have already guessed, an iPhone. Check out the trailer for this fascinating film below: More »

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Light field cameras could be the next big thing in photography and/or video, but as of right now, there is only one company selling anything that can achieve the affect: Lytro. If you have been wondering if this effect could be recreated with the DSLR you already own, the answer, as it turns out, is yes. The Chaos Collective, a group of internet futurists, has created a way to achieve the exact same effect as the Lytro camera with any DSLR, and has even created a way to embed the adjustable photos online. More »

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Lytro cameras already allow us to do something that, while (apparently) scientifically possible, seems to invoke more Gandalf than optical physics — which is to manipulate focus, dynamically and after the fact. By sampling the whole ‘light field’ within the field of view, they are truly fascinating iterations of the tools we use daily. This has some pretty interesting implications for the future of photography, not to mention videography — but Lytro isn’t stopping there. In fact, you can not only interactively shift your focal point, as you could before – but you can now, to an extent, alter the actual perspective of your shot as well, in real time — not to mention apply filters which also react in line with the company’s “living picture” aesthetic. For a demo video and some interactive examples, read on. More »

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PressPausePlay is a feature-length documentary on “hope, fear, and digital culture” that has been making the festival rounds for a while and is now available gratis on the internet. It’s highly recommended viewing at any price — you can buy it for $14.99 on iTunes or rent it for $3.99 on Amazon — but now you can also download it for free (in 1080p, no less) on the PressPausePlay site. There’s also a nifty Adobe AIR interactive version (also free) with interactive hotspots and links to full interviews. Here’s not just one but three relevant trailers: More »

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Years ago a reader emailed me about plenoptic cameras, also known as light-field cameras, which allow an image to be refocused after the picture is taken. Sometimes referred to as a 4D camera, this crazy technology is now headed to a consumer camera from new manufacturer Lytro. News of this development, which utilizes technology first seen in a 2005 Stanford research paper, hit the internet last week, with Lytro now taking reservations for the device. Check out the refocusable images in action, and let me know what you think — game-changer or gimmick? More »