» Posts Tagged ‘theater’

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Anchorman 2 Last Paramount Movie Distributed on FilmMovies have been shown in theaters on actual film since the beginning of the format, but this year could very well be the last that we get to experience new films on 35mm. It has been reported that Paramount is ending distribution on celluloid, with Anchorman 2 being their last film print release — instead releasing all new movies digitally. What does this mean for the rest of the industry, and who is going to get left behind in the process? More »

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project drive in honda movie theater digital projection film cinemaWhen was the last time you saw a movie at a drive-in theater? What would you do if you knew you could help save the few remaining drive-ins from “going dark” forever? Interestingly enough, American Honda (yes, that Honda) is giving you that exact opportunity. According to its Project Drive-In campaign, there are merely 368 drive-ins still open for theatrical screening in the US. As many drive-ins face the financial leap of upgrading to digital projection — or the looming alternative, shutting down permanently — Project Drive-In has helped save 9 theaters, donating digital projection systems to 5 of them outright. There’s still many theaters, however, that could use some serious help. Read more for details on Honda’s ongoing Project Drive-In & Indiegogo campaign. More »

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Total-Recall-1990 arnold brainHere on nofilmschool we’re pretty divided about where we think the future of the theatrical experience is headed. Should we bother saving the popcorn and scratchy seats, or is a decent screen and speaker setup, where you can watch movies in the comfort of your underwear, all we need? In a new installment of Tribeca’s The Future of Film, guest writer Andrei Severny takes a look at new technologies that reinvent the experience of film, and predicts that future theater-going may happen “in your mind.” [Cue Phillip Glass and ethereal AE template.] More »

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David MametDavid Mamet has solidified himself as a master of the stage and silver screen, having penned the Pulitzer Prize-winning play-turned-film Glengarry Glen Rossas well as receiving Oscar nominations for two of his screenplays. He’s a no-nonsense director, known to use a metronome during scene rehearsals in order to produce that iconic rhythm to his dialog, and his grasp of the scene makes him a credit to filmmaking. He shares his thoughts on film in a 15-minute video commentary, touching on everything from theories of the narrative to how to teach actors to “look at a scene.” More »

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Often when I’ve talked about small theaters going away or losing relevance thanks to the digital transition, many seem incredulous. Part of the reason they’re closing left and right is related to the expensive digital transition, which involves far more than buying an HD projector at a local Best Buy. Many of these theaters, though, offer something no multiplex can: films that are way outside the mainstream and American or foreign classics, many of which are only available in 35mm prints. The Brattle Theatre in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is one of these independent theaters, and they’re heading to Kickstarter to raise money for some necessary upgrades. Check out the video below: More »

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If you’ve had the chance to go to an independent movie theater, you know it’s a completely different experience than going to one of the chain theaters. Many of these theaters only have a few screens, and they tend to specialize in older films or those on the fringes of the filmmaking world. The theaters may not always be in perfect shape, but most of them care about the movies first — and it shows. With everything going digital, these smaller theaters are starting to disappear unless they make serious monetary investments, and that’s exactly the situation that Cinefamily in Los Angeles is going through right now. Click through to check out their Kickstarter launch video: More »

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Sony plans to ship a 4K home theater projector, the catchily-named VPL-VW1000ES, for 25 grand in early 2012. Given the $13.50-a-ticket price to see a movie here in New York City, I’ve found myself disappointed at a few recent films where the image felt soft. Sony is on the record about 4K in theaters (PDF link), and I’m convinced that it is indeed the future for the big screen. But at home? I have a 720p projector in my apartment, and it looks pretty damn good. I can only imagine that 1080p would look better, and I don’t know that I could ever tell the difference between 1080p and 4K. Still, that’s not stopping Sony — and RED — from pushing 4K projection in the home. More »