October 28, 2016
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Watch: How Horror Cinematography Taps into Our Primal Fears

Don't watch this video essay if you're scared of horror films.

[Editor's Note: No Film School asked Nelson Carvajal to create a video essay featuring some of the best cinematography in horror films.]

"When it comes to horror films, the use of cinematography goes far deeper than just camera tricks and wizardry," says Nelson Carvajal in our latest video essay. In examining the imagery of horror films both iconic and modern, from Psycho to The Phantom Carriage to Silent House, we found that the best cinematography is subjective and harnesses the power of the subconscious.  

Check back on Monday, October 31st for an exhaustive list of the most innovative techniques used in the history of horror cinematography.

Movies featured, in order of appearance:

Psycho
1960
DP: John L. Russell

The Shining
1980
DP: John Alcott

The Exorcist
1973
DP: Owen Roizman

Vampyr
1932
DP: Rudolph Maté 

Dracula
1992
DP: Michael Ballhaus 

Suspiria
1977
DP: Luciano Tovoli

Halloween
1978
DP: Dean Cundey

Silent House
2011
DP: Igor Martinovic

Repulsion
1965
DP: Gilbert Taylor

Alien
1979
DP: Derek Vanlint

Let The Right One In
2008
DP: Hoyte Van Hoytema

The Phantom Carriage
1921
DP: Julius Jaenzon

A Nightmare On Elm Street
1984
DP: Jacques Haitkin

It Follows
2014
DP: Mike Gioulakis

Nosferatu
1922
DP: Fritz Arno Wagner

The Fog
1980
DP: Dean Cundey

Jigoku
1960
DP: Mamoru Morita

The Texas Chain Saw Massacre
1974
DP: Daniel Pearl     

Featured image: "Repulsion," directed by Roman Polanski (1975)

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