September 10, 2014 at 1:48AM

0

Advice for Rookies?

Call upon all experienced professionals: What are some general do's, don'ts and tips for us young folk aspiring of breaking into the industry one day?

The tips can be in relation to any field or topic, and no advice is too basic. Just keep them coming. :)

9 Comments

This is a small piece of advice that was unrelated to film but I think it applies a lot in this industry and will help you make a good impression:

- Always reply within 24 hours.

That means, if somebody contacts you by some way, always get back to them within 24 hours, if they request something that takes longer, or if you are busy, just reply with stating that. Just a short 'Good to hear from you, unfortunately I'm rather busy right now but I will get back to you' - insert a time frame if you have one.

It will make a good impression and tell the client or other side you have read their inquiry. Sometimes when I send stuff out I don't even know if people recieved it because there's just no reaction, so I made this my creed.

September 10, 2014 at 3:07AM

0
Reply
avatar
Philip Drobar
Video Editor
273

Now that's a tip I have never heard before. Thank you for that. It is true that whenever I respond to an e-mail that I received a week earlier I feel ashamed that it took me so long to simply respond to an e-mail. That's a very good habit to avoid starting every e-mail with "I'm sorry that it took me so long to respond. I spend the week in bed mourning over my dead goldfish or some lame excuse like that."

September 10, 2014 at 7:27AM

4
Reply

I also am a young filmmaker and have learned many tips along the way.
1. Make connections with EVERYONE and let them know you're serious about your work
2. Be professional (be the awe in awesome when people talk about you)
3. Be prepared, the only way to make an impression is to be better than your competitors (have a script or storyboard in your back pocket when you tell people about yourself)
4. Be confident, a lot of filmmakers consider their work a hobby not a life. Be proud of your work ( even be proud of mistakes you learned from)
5. Fail. If you can't take criticism and move on to be better, this may not be your chosen field of expertise
6. Network. Be it through FB, NFS, YouTube or anywhere else, show your work, take names and numbers of everyone you meet (even people who don't work in film), and keep them until you die. You never know when someone you used to know may come in handy or becomes the new Spielberg
7. Never stop. Always be in a production mode. Settling down and getting comfortable in life will get you nowhere. Own every moment you live, own it with film.

September 11, 2014 at 7:21PM

9
Reply
avatar
Dallin Wells
Director/Producer/Editor/Writer/DP/Actor
290

Well, the best piece of advice would be...GET OUT WHILE YOU STILL CAN!!! In all seriousness though, its a tough industry and hard to make a decent living from, especially if you are trying to be a writer or director. Get a 2nd Job that pays the bills :)

September 14, 2014 at 7:09AM

9
Reply
avatar
Byron Q
Writer/Director
243

Hi Robert, Get your micro-moives out there and start building your fan base! We have created a platform called Cardora.co where movie lovers can send out micro-movies to their friends and family and moviemakers can get a revenue stream and build their crowd from this activity. http://nofilmschool.com/boards/discussions/cardora-film-festival-make-mo... You can enter the Cardora Film Festival here: https://filmfreeway.com/festival/Cardora and get a 10% discount with the code NoFilmSchool. Good luck.

September 24, 2014 at 5:17AM

0
Reply
avatar
Celine Rich
Producer
215

Invest in yourself (time, money, whatever). Take classes, buy gear you can afford, read books, watch tutorials, join clubs and groups and work your ass off.

October 14, 2014 at 8:28PM

7
Reply
avatar
Kevin Greene
Editor
792

I'd like to second Philip's advice about replying promptly to people, and Byron's advice about getting a second job (especially part-time: it gives you some money, and gives you some time -- the most precious resource).

If you're looking at buying gear, consider getting something that other people in your area don't have. Then you can get gigs by offering, "Hire me, and I'll bring this great gear with me." I don't mean something exotic, just something useful but less ubiquitous. Everyone has cameras, but I landed lots of gigs just because I was a guy with microphones, digital audio-recorder, etc.

October 16, 2014 at 1:32PM

0
Reply
avatar
Minor Mogul
Dilettante
673

I advise you to go to various seminars, conducted various courses and improve yourself. Discover something new and try yourself in different industries.

September 11, 2018 at 8:33AM

5
Reply
avatar
CarlaCoach
Writer
22

Self-development is the most important thing! We must invest in ourselves.

September 14, 2018 at 12:46AM

0
Reply
avatar
Jim Holl
Writer
9

Your Comment