July 27, 2015 at 11:29AM

0

The audio on this video clip is rubbish

I recently bought a Rode VideoMic Pro with dead cat and have updated my OM-D EM5 to the Mark 2 version. I went out today and recorded the following clip by sticking the mic on top of the camera and hitting record on a windy day. That is, no filter buttons or any alterations were done in preparation, no high/low pass buttons switched and nothing altered on the EM5.

https://youtu.be/N8DSPr94IfU

Ignore the lighting and camera position as this was just an audio test in the wind. What bothers me is when the wind blows, right at the moment when I say that the viewer should be able to hear me above the wind (ironically), the audio drops.

I realise I should be using the filter buttons or some setting on the OM-D, but I don't know what. Should I be using low-pass cut out or something? I'm a noob to external mic recording.

Any pointers?

6 Comments

OK, things are not as bad as you might think they are, but you have to do some post processing of your audio to make it usable.

Here's a link to download a WAV file of your audio that I have processed using my normal video audio workflow...

GM Processed Audio ( about 5 MB ZIP file )
https://goo.gl/vkEQhu

Here are the basic steps I did to create this new version of your audio...

1- Converted the audio track from 16-bit to 24-bit for more accurate audio processing.

2- Used an 80 Hz high-pass filter to get rid of all the low frequency noise

3- Increased the volume of the audio by +6 dB

4- Used Paragraphic EQ to improve the over all sound ( this is my idea of improvement )

5- Selected a background ambient section of your recording to create a noise-reduction filter that I would use to bring down the over all background ambient noise.

6- Used an 8 to 1 compressor to reduce the dynamic range of the recording, so the loud parts and the quiet parts are now closer together.

...When shooting your video and monitoring your audio with a good pair of closed back headphones, if you hear this kind of wind noise you should try and find a way of blocking the wind from blowing directly on your microphone without blocking the sounds you want to record. It's definitely possible to get less wind noise than you are recording here, but you will need to practice a little bit to learn how to more effectively use your microphone.

Lastly, I suspect that you have Automatic-Level-Control turned on in your camera's audio setting controls ( or the camera turns it on by default ), so to get more consistent audio recording levels you need to manually set the camera's audio level. ( some cameras allow you to do this, and some don't )

July 27, 2015 at 2:18PM, Edited July 27, 2:23PM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
29856

Set your Audio settings from Autolevel to manually level. Because when the win d hits the mic the Mic lowers the input sound and when its quiter it raises. So set it to manually. Hope that helps.

July 29, 2015 at 5:36AM

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Cathy Danneberg
Filmmaker, Editor, Designer, VFX
619

The problem you are hearing is not a case of advanced settings or post production. It is a matter of setting your camera's audio levels manually; and cutting off your limiter. Right now in that test clip, anytime the wind became loud, the camera's auto audio control would bring the levels down...wind and speech.

July 30, 2015 at 6:11AM

3
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Ben Hilton
DP, Editor
64

Also keep in mind, furry wind socks such as used in your test will not eliminate wind noise. The only thing that will effectively block all wind distortion is a blimp--anywhere from $300 to a lot more. A furry wind sock will help reduce the effects of lite wind a little bit, but for harsh wind it will not help very much.
If you cannot afford a blimp, which I suspect you probably cannot, I would suggest getting your Rode mic onto a boom pole as close to the subject as possible. (If you cannot afford a boom pole, you can make a basic one yourself, with plenty of tutorials online) Try to place your subjects in a place shielded away from the wind if possible; behind a tent, house, building, large car ect. Another trick would be to place your subjects with their backs to the wind, then place your mic on your boom pole upside down in front of them with the mic pointing at their mouths. This will create a human wind block. We have had a bit of success with using large objects you may have with you such as a 5 in 1 reflector as a wind block for the mic.

A good preventative would be to keep a lookout for wind speeds when deciding when to film. Filmmaking is all about intentional planning and setting yourself up for success.

July 30, 2015 at 6:26AM

4
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Ben Hilton
DP, Editor
64

Someone mentioned making sure to monitor with headphones, which is obviously impossible on some cameras. It looks like your camera doesn't have one, so what I'll do in those situations is set up your shot and do a quick 10-30 second audio test. You should be able to play back the test clip in camera (with its terrible speaker) and at least hear whether or not your mic is being overloaded with wind.
It's obviously not ideal, but it at least lets you know if you need to move your mic.

July 31, 2015 at 3:19PM

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If your camera doesn't have a headphone jack, then a low cost recorder with headphone jack is the simplest fix, and then you can sync in post. ( lots of different ways to sync in post, it's really not that hard )

July 31, 2015 at 4:58PM

2
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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
29856

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