February 10, 2016 at 1:23PM, Edited February 10, 1:27PM

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Nikkor 28-45mm

Hey everybody.

I'm starting to build up a small kit (lights, backdrops, etc.) to try to start making a little money shooting interview stuff. I currently have a GH3 and I'm considering a GH2 to have an inexpensive second camera.

I'm looking to get some old Nikkor lenses and am wondering if anyone has shot video with the 28-45mm f/4.5 And has anything to say about it? I've tried to find tests and reviews with this lens shooting video, especially on a Lumix, but can't seem to find anything.

Thanks!

7 Comments

History of the Nikon 28-45mm Lens
http://goo.gl/WuXYRE

Comparison: Nikon 28-45mm f/4.5, Nikon 25-50mm f/4.0, Nikon 28-50mm f/3.5
http://goo.gl/wpKtNs

So it looks like it's a sharp lens but prone to lens flare and a low-contrast image, but still might be worth it if the price is right.

February 10, 2016 at 3:01PM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
32937

Thanks, Guy. Those are the only two resources that I found before coming here, too, so obviously it's not a super popular lens. I was just hoping someone here had experience. I think I might get one and test it out though. They're not very expensive.

February 11, 2016 at 5:31AM

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Paul Gall
Writer / Director / Editor
151

It's a really old lens, one of the first Nikon wide-angle zooms ever made, so DSLR video shooting came along 30+ years after this lens came out.

It appears to be a sharp lens, but you have to be careful about lens flare.

February 11, 2016 at 11:02AM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
32937

Right. There's no shortage of videos and information about the prime lenses from that era though, so I was hoping there was something more about this one. I love the feel of those old lenses which is why I was asking. They have a substantial feeling to them instead of the plastic feeling. I ended up buying one.

And since you're basically a legend on here, I'll just ask you directly instead of opening up another discussion. Do you have any experience or advice about keeping gear in a car that's subject to cold or hot temps? I have a really small apartment and want to maximize my space. I would think the c-stands and light stands would be ok in those elements, right? My main concern is lights. I have a 9 bulb Octacool light which is a pretty hefty light and takes up a bunch of space in my apartment if I don't disassemble it. And it's a major pain to assemble. Is that something that would be susceptible to failure in somewhat harsh temperatures (10 degrees to 110 degrees f) or would they hold up to that?

February 13, 2016 at 9:45PM

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Paul Gall
Writer / Director / Editor
151

I used this with a DP on a small set. Had the same look as most of the nikkor primes we had as well. But yes the flaring is a bit ridiculous as the lens definitely does it more than all the other nikkors, save maybe the 55mm f3.5. Otherwise the manual aperture is nice, the throw is short and wont really be helpful. But if you have a bunch of shots where you'll be changing between these two points alot then I can see the benefit.

Pretty sure it was this movie we used it on, probably in the kitchen scene. Cam was the 5d mkii:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OuzqJPL6ZnY

February 12, 2016 at 6:00AM

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Chris Hackett
Director, Director of Photography, Writer
829

Thanks, Chris. I was hoping it would have the same characteristics as their other primes.

February 13, 2016 at 9:49PM, Edited February 13, 9:49PM

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Paul Gall
Writer / Director / Editor
151

>>>I love the feel of those old lenses which is why I was asking. They have a substantial feeling to them instead of the plastic feeling. I ended up buying one.

Yes, I own 8 Nikon AI-S prime lenses, which is what I shoot with most of the time on my GH4 camera. The look is great on the GH4 ( doesn't have the over-sharpened look that the Lumix lenses can have ) and the focusing is very smooth. I also like old wonky lenses, especially the Eastern European and Russian lenses that add their own "flavor" to the image you shoot.

>>>And since you're basically a legend on here

Ha! Sometimes I have too much time on my hands...

>>>Do you have any experience or advice about keeping gear in a car that's subject to cold or hot temps?

Living in Canada I am pretty familiar with both hot and cold temperatures. The main issue when shooting in cold temps is condensation when bringing warm indoor gear out into the cold, or when bringing cold gear back indoors. If I am going to be shooting outside in the cold, I will try and give my gear an hour to cool down while inside a pelican case. This way when I open my case the gear has cooled down and is ready to start shooting.

It's the reverse when bringing cold gear inside, where you want to give your camera inside the pelican case an hour to warm up. You can speed this up by sealing your camera and lenses inside of air-tight plastic bags and giving them 15 minutes to adjust to the temperature difference. ( once inside the plastic bags you don't put them inside of anything, so that they will heat up or cool down as fast as possible, and the plastic bags will stop condensation from getting inside )

Most camera gear is ok in hot temperatures, as long as you don't place black cameras or lenses directly in the sun for hours. You can cover things with white cloth or plastic to help keep them cool while under direct sunlight, or you can rig a large "flag" to block the light from your equipment while you shoot. ( a very good idea when shooting under direct sunlight )

Storing gear in the car can be ok, but I would be careful on really hot days, where you don't want to bake your gear in the trunk of your car. ( the grease in your lenses can leak if it gets too hot )

>>>I have a really small apartment and want to maximize my space. I would think the c-stands and light stands would be ok in those elements, right?

I recommend using Auto-Poles like these: http://goo.gl/S4OATc

Which lock between the floor and the ceiling of the room, so you can place them right up against the wall or in the corner of the room, and because they have no "legs" they take up very little room. They are also easy to quickly move around.

You can also mount a Wall-Boom to the Auto-Pole, which gives you a boom up to 7 feet long that can reach down to the floor or up to the ceiling ( or anywhere in between ), and it has 180 degrees of movement so you can place a light almost anywhere in the room with nothing getting in the way. The Wall-Boom mounts to the Auto-Pole with Super-Clamps, or you can even permanently mount the Wall-Boom to the wall if you like.

http://goo.gl/gUuqbB

>>>I have a 9 bulb Octacool light. Is that something that would be susceptible to failure in somewhat harsh temperatures.

The Octacool light uses compact fluorescent lights, which as far as I know are not really bothered by temperature as long as you give them time to stabilize. ( i.e. give them 2 minutes to stabilize their temperature and brightness before you start shooting ) To be 100 percent safe, I would contact the manufacturer to see what they have to say about using their lights in very hot or very cold temperatures. ( Hot glass can break if it comes into contact with direct cold. I've broken some drinking glasses when emptying the dish-washer and filling them up with cold water before letting the hot glasses cool down )

February 13, 2016 at 10:27PM, Edited February 13, 10:31PM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
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