October 5, 2014 at 2:35PM

2
You voted '-1'.

Best recorder/pre-amp for low-budget indie

Hey guys, I'm shooting my first short this winter which I'm really excited about. I have a solid script, some good actor friends, and I've been doing test shots and I'm really confident on how this will turn out.

The only thing I'm unsure of, however, is my audio. I have a Pentax K30 and I think I may forever rue the day I laid eyes on it. I bought it when I was young and naive, and only cared about the HD resolution. What I'm only recently coming to find out is that there is no in-camera audio input. No plugin for a mic. I'm kicking myself really hard now.

I have a Rode SmartLav and the Rode Rec app, which I plan on using a bit. I'm also looking into the Audio-Technica ATR 6550, just a cheap shotgun mic I'll use for getting long-distance sound (a guy swimming across a river). I'm also thinking of getting a Rode VideoMic or similiar to mount on my camera.

Now my problem... what do I use to record the audio? I've looked at JuicedLink and Tascam but I have no idea how those work... if they're my only option I will go with that but I'm thinking there has to be an alternative. I just need like a handheld (or not) device that runs on battery to plug my mics into, and is relatively cheap (or affordable), that's all i ask...

please help, and thanks!

53 Comments

Shotgun mics do NOT work like telephoto lenses, so they won't give you better sound when recording a subject that is far from your microphone.

Shotgun mics are designed to record audio from a very narrow angle of acceptance, so you can use one to record a person speaking in a noisy environment and it will help you to isolate your subject from the background noise.

All mics are designed to be used no further than 2-3 feet from your subject, so trying to record somebody far away with a shotgun mic will produce BAD results.

The only mic that can be used to record distant sounds is a parabolic dish-mic ( the mics with a big clear acrylic "dish" that concentrates sound at the focus point of the "dish" ), which is definitely not the best type of mic in terms of audio quality but it does allow you to record faint sounds from far away.

October 5, 2014 at 5:23PM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
31488

Thanks for the advice! I do understand what the shotgun is used for, but I've also heard it can be used in this type of situation. Mind you, the action wont be too far away... say maybe 50 feet. I figured this would be a better option than a plain mic.

October 5, 2014 at 6:58PM

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Torsten Pearson
Writer-Director-Editor
400

I can't speak highly enough of the zoom h4n recorder. A great investment for under $300 (online). Definitely consider this before racing to buy a tascam or some juicedlink equipment. The zoom is very user friendly, after a brief youtube tutorial you'll be ready to record

October 6, 2014 at 7:03AM, Edited October 6, 7:03AM

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Tom McKenna
Jack of all trades
13

i concur for several reasons. i actually find the tascam easier to use with an audio background but the zoom is cheap, comes with a decent case, and also works as an audio interface. the h5 is the one to get.

Kazu Okuda

October 6, 2014 at 10:39AM

I Share the same sentiments... i have done all my productions with myZoom H4N and that thing is superb!.. with a proper shotgun you can get results similar to those in blockbuster films. So get the H4N and you will be a happy person!

Wentworth Kelly

October 7, 2014 at 12:46AM, Edited October 7, 12:46AM

I too am another zoom h4n fan. While inputs are limited the interface is clean and easy. The price point is great and portability hasn't been an issue. I do traveling doc stuff and have on occasion wished the headphone jack was in a different spot as it becomes kind of awkward to just toss in a pocket while in use, but that can't be recommended anyways!

Paul Kachris-Newman

October 19, 2014 at 4:16PM

Zoom h6 in every way is one of the best field recorders under $600 USD. I use it on all sorts of shoots.... and with a battery extension (5VDC - 2200mah backup) this device can certainly out perform many of it's more expensive cousins!

Jordan

October 19, 2014 at 7:37PM

The Zoom H4n has been the go-to audio recorder for a while, and I understand why (I bought one). But I just sold it on eBay in order to partially fund either the Zoom H5 or Tascam DR-70D for a few reasons. 1) DO NOT GET THE H4n IF YOU INTEND TO USE IT WITH THE RODE NTG-2. Each piece of gear is great on its own, but together they are TERRIBLE. If you root around on the net, you'll find the issue is that the NTG-2 requires that you set input levels on the H4n approaching 100. The H5 and H6 do much better, as I believe does the Tascam. 2) Amazingly, the H4n has a date and time stamp bug that has never been fixed - when you bring audio files into FCPX (I assume this is true for any NLE), you lose the actual recording date and time. 3) H4n battery life is not great, and when you have to change batteries, you have to remove it from whatever you've attached it to to reach the battery compartment -- a royal pain. Other than that, I used it and liked it until I reached the point where these things became too much of a set of liabilities. Good luck!

Hugh Brownstone

November 23, 2014 at 7:29AM

If you do end up going with the Tascam, look for bundles like this one: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1015347-REG/tascam_tascam_dr_60d_h...

A free copy of PluralEyes is a really, really nice bonus.

October 6, 2014 at 8:59AM

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David S.
3093

I will also jump on the bandwagon of getting an outboard video recorder. I don't know much about the Pentax line of cameras but I assume there is no audio monitoring and it probably have AGC, and even with something like the JuicedLink - you are still better off having a separate unit to record your audio to, that gives you meters and a headphone jack to monitor the sound.

I use the Tascam DR-680, which is a bigger version of the DR60 that David mentioned - and I can't speak highly enough of PluralEyes - it is incredible software to get your audio synced... even in takes where the Camera Op missed the slate, the program still synced perfectly by looking at the audio waveforms.

October 6, 2014 at 9:45AM

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Scott Selman
Content Creator | Filmmaker | Producer
1044

Sorry - I hit enter to quickly... you could also look at renting gear for this shoot to see what you are comfortable with. Not sure where you are located- but even the smallest of rental houses have decent audio kits and they are usually dirt cheap depending on how long your production will be. I use BorrowLenses which ships out of both the East and West coasts and they have great mics and recorders at great prices.

October 6, 2014 at 9:48AM

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Scott Selman
Content Creator | Filmmaker | Producer
1044

Thanks for your input! I live in small town Idaho... Boise maybe 45 minutes away. I'm on shoestring budget though, right now I'm just taking what I can get.

Torsten Pearson

October 9, 2014 at 12:44AM

>>>I do understand what the shotgun is used for, but I've also heard it can be used in this type of situation.

A shotgun mic would be no better than any other high quality mic in this situation, and the results would be extremely poor as you are WAY too far from your subject.

The only mic designed to be used further than 2-3 feet away from your subject is the parabolic mic I mentioned previously. Every other mic is made to be used within a few feet or your subeject.

October 6, 2014 at 12:39PM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
31488

Haven't read this whole thread by WHYYYY has no one mentioned just doing ADR? I've made entire features just with ADR, lots of films with scenes that didn't work or I didn't like the performance, etc... and it's so quick and less of a hassle than trying to record something far away. You may think it's better if it's real, but you'll have so much more control over exactly how it sounds rather than having to perfect imperfect audio. Just a thought. Coppola did entire movies with ADR. Just sayin

Miles RAS

August 31, 2015 at 11:06PM

>>>I can't speak highly enough of the zoom h4n recorder

I can't speak POORLY enough of the Zoom H4n as it's a noisy over-priced unit, while there are much better buys on the market.

The Zoom H5, Zoom H6, or Tascam DR-40 are all at least 10 dB quieter than the Zoom H4n, and they can take a proper LINE level audio signal while the Zoom H4n can't. ( you have to add a 20 dB inline pad to accept a LINE level signal with the Zoom H4n )

The Tascam DR-40 is also much cheaper, occasionally selling for as little as $150 brand new.

October 6, 2014 at 12:42PM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
31488

The DR-40 won't last a day on a shoot, it's built like the cheapest Chinese toy. Also the pre's are way noisier than a Zoom H4N (which is noisy). A great option is a Zoom H4N and a FetHed in line pre amp/gain booster, to bypass the H4n's preamps, this will give you super clean audio although it runs on Phantom power so you'll need a lot of batteries.

Studio LAX

October 14, 2014 at 6:15AM

I use the Zoom H6 on all sorts of complicated shoots. I must say that the preamps are outstanding! Can't say enough positives about it!

Jordan

October 19, 2014 at 7:32PM

I highly recommend any of the JuicedLink preamps.

October 7, 2014 at 7:36PM

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Micah Van Hove
Writer
director, producer, dp

Thank you all for your replies! I've decided to go with the Audiotechnica ATR 6550 shotgun and the Zoom H1... lol don't all attack me at once :)

Even getting this dirt cheap on Amazon came out to $160... more than I'd like to spend, but, no joke better than what I had before. Like I said, I'm just doing anything to get away from onboard audio, with a camera that has no audio input jack.

I realize this will take some editing to get it to sound good. I think I'll be good because its a simple project with little dialogue. I'll post a link up when I get it done and finished with festivals and stuff so you can critique it and tell me how right you all were lol

Just waiting until I can afford the good stuff.

October 9, 2014 at 12:55AM

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Torsten Pearson
Writer-Director-Editor
400

I'm using a cheep shotgun with the H1 as a pre-amp and running that into my T3i.
Shotgun > H1 line-in > H1 line-out/headphone > T3i mic input.
Using the H1 as the pre-amp and setting the onboard pre-amp low produces better quality and puts level controls at your fingertips on the H1. It's not professional but better than the on-board preamp.

Another option for better quality would be this same setup AND record to the H1 at the same time as a high quality uncompressed wave. Doing both not only provides an audio backup, it also makes syncing in post easier.

mlitty

October 20, 2014 at 4:14PM

>>>The DR-40 won't last a day on a shoot, it's built like the cheapest Chinese toy

It's not built like a Sound Devices recorder, but then you aren't paying $2K for it. I own two DR-40 recorders that have been used almost every week for the past 2 years without any problems. ( I own higher end gear, but for some things the DR-40 recorders are a good fit )

In terms of durability, I've had more problems when using other people's Zoom H4n recorders than any other recorder. It's not a well made device. ( the newer Zoom H5 and H6 recorders are much better )

>>>Also the pre's are way noisier than a Zoom H4N (which is noisy).

I've done my own noise-floor tests, and the Tascam DR-40 comes out 10+ dB quieter than the Zoom H4n. Under ideal conditions you can get a noise floor of -76 dB RMS with the DR-40, while the Zoom H4n shows a best noise floor between -63 to -66 dB RMS depending when the unit was made. ( about the same range as my old Panasonic GH2 and HMC-150 cameras, which is not terrible but it leaves no room for mistakes )

>>>A great option is a Zoom H4N and a FetHed in line pre amp/gain booster, to bypass the H4n's preamps, this will give you super clean audio although it runs on Phantom power so you'll need a lot of batteries.

I normally use LINE level signal from a Sound Devices MixPre-D mixer for audio testing, which can't be used with a Zoom H4n without adding a 20 dB inline XLR pad as the H4n can't handle a professional LINE level signal without the inline pad. The Tascam DR-40 and the Zoom H5 and H6 recorders have no problems with a professional LINE level signal.

October 15, 2014 at 11:30PM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
31488

Obviously apples and potatoes concerning the subjective sound quality (I don't waste my time testing in ideal conditions I test the gear in a similar situation to which it's going to be used) interestingly the Tascam records at a lower bit rate at 48Khz than the Zoom. However there's no way the DR-40 is built better than a Zoom H4N, the difference in the quality of the plastics is a million miles away. The only thing that went wrong with my zoom in four years of heavy use was the headphone socket failed which I fixed). On the DR-40 the headphone socket failed in the first day and the quarter inch screw thread on the bottom split on first use.

Studio LAX

October 19, 2014 at 4:51PM

I'm not sure if this has been pointed out, but it may be a good idea to film your actor swimming, and then go to a local pool, or even have him swim closer to your camera so that you can get some foley of him swimming. In post, you just need to use the foley of him swimming over the footage of him swimming far away. But you don't want it to make it sound like the camera is right next to him because it'll throw off the viewers. Personally, I would turn down the foley effect a little bit so it'll give the illusion of better audio without it being obvious that you've done the effect.

Good luck with your film!

October 16, 2014 at 10:26AM

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Christopher Brazil
Audio/Video Tech
466

I hadn't thought of that... that's a very good idea! I think I'll be going with that. Thanks!

Torsten Pearson

October 21, 2014 at 3:48PM

For your short, the h1 will work just fine and it's super portable. Good luck!

October 16, 2014 at 11:50PM

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The Marantz PMD661 is arguably the best professional grade recorder/pre-amp you can get for under $400. It's weird how this unit has been so overlooked the last 5 years or so.

October 17, 2014 at 12:24AM

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Ty Harper
Producer/Documentarian/Broadcaster
123

Where can you buy Marantz PMD661 Mk2 for $400 ?

Most places I've seen list this recorder at $600 or more.

Guy McLoughlin

October 17, 2014 at 1:17PM

Not the MKII, the original model. I'm in Toronto and've seen it listed for between $390 - $450 over the last year. Trew has had one up for $450 on its consignment page for months now. http://www.trewaudio.com/consignment/recorders/
You can totally contact them and barter. They'll just call the seller and see if he's interested. Either way, even at $600 and under, I don't know of any other portable recorders that can beat it, all round; yet it rarely, if ever, gets mentioned. I'm just glad I really did my research back when I got mine (paid $500 I think), or else, based on the brands that do get mentioned on these prosumer portable recorder threads, I wouldn'tve even known it existed.

October 17, 2014 at 3:36PM, Edited October 17, 3:36PM

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Ty Harper
Producer/Documentarian/Broadcaster
123

I agree about the PMD661 Mk2, it's an excellent piece of kit despite a somewhat abstruse interface, but it does have dedicated rotary input level controls and 6mm headphone socket.

The only other comparable recorder in this price bracket is the Tascam DR680 which has quiet(ish) preamps and good sound quality but eats batteries and has the usual poor Tascam build quality. I don't know what went wrong with Tascam stuff, their Portastudios in the 90s were built like tanks.

I actually replaced my Zoom H4N with a PMD661 mk2, got a bargain on ebay £300 (under $500) including the incredibly overpriced but very useful UDG case.

Studio LAX

October 26, 2014 at 6:13PM

Have a better answer? Share your thought and insights.

October 17, 2014 at 9:01PM

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Harlan Rumjahn
Low-level government official
188

Sound has always been something I've thought about in my little projects. Namely, how to get the best sound with the smallest amount of equipment.

What I have found is that the Juiced Link Riggy Micro is invaluable. I have a Rode NTG-2 microphone, which is often mentioned in the blogs as being pretty good. However, it is very weak. The Riggy solved that problem beautifully (and can probably solve the problem for any other weak microphone).

You can also make a little contraption, like I did, which consists of the microphone attached to the Riggy which is attached to whatever small, handheld recorder you have (more on this below). Those three pieces of equipment I "MacGyvered" together with hair rubber bands and the screw holes that come with the devices. The result is a jerry-rigged-looking thing that I can hold in my hand completely separate from any other piece of equipment (i.e my camera), and it records high quality sound. You can also stick the microphone at the end of a home-made boom pole (painter's pole), but you need a long XLR cable (mic at one end, recorder and riggy at the other).

The Tascam DR-40 is what I have been using as my small, low-noise, handheld recorder for forever (I even used to attach it to the end of my home-made boom pole to great success). But just recently I moved up to something which is even smaller with possibly higher quality sound: Sony PCM-M10. This device is slick, but it doesn't take an XLR connection. This turns out not to matter to me, since the Riggy connects with a mini jack. Everyone always talks about how XLR connectors are the best but, in my humble opinion, I do not think there is any detriment to the sound quality at all. But I'm no professional :)

I love my little package and always go back to it, even though I know there are more expensive pieces of equipment out there.

Good luck, and have fun!

October 17, 2014 at 9:27PM

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Harlan Rumjahn
Low-level government official
188

I preferred the Tascam DR-100 over the Zoom H4N mostly for personal reasons. We had a Tascam and a Rode NTG-2 for our latest documentary on fracking, "Triple Divide": http://tripledividefilm.org/ — I'd say 30% of the film used the onboard stereo mics (we used these in our "Split-Estate" chapter), and the rest the NTG-2 (this can be heard in the chapter "The Judys"). There's clips on our VOD if you want to compare the two. Hope it helps.

October 19, 2014 at 3:47PM

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jbpribanic
Director/Editor/Photographer
107

I've had good results with the Tascam Dr60d.

October 19, 2014 at 3:50PM

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Lane McCall
Producer/Director
416

The Sound Decices MM-1 pre-amp saved me, allowing me to get quite decent audio in-camera. I've also got the Zoom H4s but only used it for post. The only downside to the zoom for what you're looking to do, is that it doesn't do well recording more than 1 input. It has a 4-track recording mode but I've found it to be extremely slow and unresponsive. So that would put the Tascam I've seen mentioned above the Zoom, as it seems to handle multitrack recording better.

October 19, 2014 at 4:11PM

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Mark Chaney
Writer/Director/Composer
187

Tascam just upgraded their DR-60D to a Mark 2 version with better mic preamps and stepless gain, so this is probably the best mic preamp/recording unit at $200.

There is also a new Tascam DR-70 model which has the same upgrades as the DR-60D Mk2, plus it has 4 XLR mic inputs and 4 mic gain pots, so you can ride the gain for each mic independently while you shoot. It's expected to sell around $300 US, which will be a steal if it's as good as it appears to be on paper.

October 19, 2014 at 4:39PM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
31488

Are you a rep/social media marketeer for Tascam? You're constantly spewing out (spurious) marketing information and you're all over anyone dissing their products.

Studio LAX

October 26, 2014 at 6:18PM

iRig Pro into an iPad or iPhone. Fantastic 24 bit 48khz sound quality for very little money. We recorded a whole web series like this. Seems to be a very well-kept secret...

October 19, 2014 at 5:30PM

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Ian Garforth
Filmmaker
181

Or, hacked I-rig pre into your Zoom or Tascam.

S Hunsaker

October 19, 2014 at 8:08PM

if your gonna cheap out on sound and not get someone trained to operate the equipment properly. RENT the Sennhesier mkh MKH 70-1 shotgun for long range and either DPA 4061 or sanken cos-11d for your wireless to give the up front sound recording the best quality chance you have.

October 19, 2014 at 8:48PM

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William Pierce
Sound Mixer
74

rent a sound device 633 as well. 6 inputs and kicks butt with batteries

October 19, 2014 at 8:52PM

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William Pierce
Sound Mixer
74

The Zoom h4 is a warhorse for this. Is resistent. The professionals use them. It's easy.

October 20, 2014 at 6:07AM

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Ragüel Cremades
Film producer and director
7782

The best sound comes from two human beings - the sound mixer and a boom operator. Hire them and your sound will be forever changed.

October 21, 2014 at 6:12PM

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Mano Guha
Production Sound Mixer
86

I agree with Mano Guha. Talented people can make great things happen with average equipment. The best equipment in the world in the hands of an idiot will still produce garbage. However, if you're interested in a quality digital recorder, I've used the Zoom H4 (and some of its siblings) and found it very over-rated and not terribly durable for field work. Once you bust off one of the Mickey Mouse ear microphones, you're screwed. I cant recommend enough the Roland R-26. Lots of bang for the buck, and I've used it in the field as well as in the studio. It has excellent built-in mics, but also two XLR inputs, and a touch-screen interface. FYI, my sound guy loves it, too.

October 22, 2014 at 2:31PM

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Andy Lindsay
DP/Editor
74

I was in the same position. Had a 5Dmk2, cheap shotgun mic with an Zoom H1, but it was a real struggle to always check if all devices were recording. Is the mic on? Is the recorder on? Is the camera on? Forgetting to press record on your Zoom once in a documentary, means the entire take is useless. Happened to me a number of times. And what bothered me the most was the syncing in post. I used PluralEyes, but most of the time the audio was a bit faster than the video. Apart from that, the sound of the Zoom H1 was pretty flat.

I bought a JuicedLink RA333 about a year ago and I must say it really changed the way I was filming. Plug your mics in the JuicedLink and that's it! Nothing else to worry about. Just press the record button on your camera and everything will work perfectly. You never have to worry about pressing the record button on your Zoom again and best of all NO syncing in post!! You can monitor your audio on the meters and via headphones. And the best part is that you can hook up 3 mics with XLR's. Even with phantom power. So you can pin a lav on both your talent and yourself. For camera's with AGC it has a special feature were it disables the AGC. Really, save up for a pre-amp cause it will make life so much easier.

October 23, 2014 at 1:52PM, Edited October 23, 1:52PM

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Stacey de Graaff
Cinematographer | Editor
111

I used the Tascam 60D and It's a very versatile recorder that produces great audio even with a cheap shotgun mic like a Vidpro.

October 24, 2014 at 10:34AM

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Tony Carter
Director/Writer
74

>>>Are you a rep/social media marketeer for Tascam? You're constantly spewing out (spurious) marketing information and you're all over anyone dissing their products.

I use what works and have professionally used more than a dozen different lower cost audio recorders over the past 10 years. ( Fostex DC-R302, Olympus LS-7, Olympus LS-10, Olympus LS-11, Olympus LS-12, Marantz PMD670, Sony PCM-M50, Sony PCM-M10, Tascam DR-07 Mk1, Tascam DR-07 Mk2, Tascam DR-40, Tascam DR-100 Mk2, Zoom H1, Zoom H2, Zoom H4n )

I currently own and work with the following recorders: Fostex DC-R302, Olympus LS-12, Sony PCM-M10, Tascam DR-07 Mk2, Tascam DR-40

And will be adding the Tascam DR-70 to the mix once it's out.

Over the past 10 years the worst recorders that I have had to deal with are the Tascam DR-07 Mk1, Zoom H4 ( and it's horrible background "beep" issue ) and the newer Zoom H4n. I personally think that these are very poor quality recorders and would strongly recommend staying away from them.

I have no problems with the Zoom brand, and consider the newer Zoom H5 and H6 to be excellent value in a low cost recorder.

October 27, 2014 at 2:47PM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
31488

Guy M, I think you diminish your argument by by accusing anothers opinion of being a Tascam fanboy.
I have had Tascam products for forty yrs now and currently use the DR-100mk2 and the 680 for recording. I have chosen them over Zoom mostly to their superior build quality, sound quality and ergonomics. I find zoom for me an inferior, but for others another choice compared to the Tascam. However any of these are tools to use and many find satisfaction using Zoom products. I think however you lose creditably and authority when questioning the motives of others, because it works two ways.

November 25, 2014 at 5:24PM

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When buying a new portable recorder I recommend people to steer clear of the Zoom H4n because it offers poor value compared to any of the competing models, including the Zoom H5 and H6 recorders. I say this based upon my own personal experience of using the Zoom H4n along with many other portable recorders in the same price range over the past 5 years.

Guy McLoughlin

November 27, 2014 at 10:45AM

might seem confusing, use what ever you want, just saying everyone is entitled to their opinion. No one should be ridiculed for having one.

November 25, 2014 at 5:31PM

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I don't believe I've ridiculed anyone about this issue.

My personal opinion is that the Zoom H4n is a low quality recorder ( i.e. high noise-floor, cannot accept a LINE level signal without a 20 dB external pad, etc... ) and would strongly recommend buying a different model like the Zoom H5 or H6, the Olympus LS-12 or LS-14, Sony PCM-M10, Tascam DR-07 Mk2, DR-40, or DR-60 recorders.

Guy McLoughlin

November 27, 2014 at 10:49AM

Lofar, I'm sorry I'm a bit confused, no where can I find in this thread where Guy M is ridiculing anyone for their opinions let along accusing anyone of being a "fanboy". Guy was simple explaining his experiences in a very detailed and professional manner, one that is in line with my own experiences with the same sound recording equipment (Tascam DR-40 > Zoom H4n).

Stefaan Sorensen

December 14, 2014 at 8:26AM

From my experience, dual system is best. I've done audio recording on a many shorts . I use a Røde ntg-3 and a Fostex fr-2le or a Nagra 4.2

October 24, 2015 at 4:29AM, Edited October 24, 4:29AM

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Zoom H4 and H4n - circular file in the nearest trash receptical.
Not for the crappy noise floor or less then stellar Pre-Amps, but for the user interface.
Which is the same reason I wouldn't use a Tascan DR-40.

When recording, an analog interface - dials you can turn - is a much more natural and instinctual interface for a person to use. You can find and roll the dials precisely and in infinitely variable amounts, rather then the 100 steps of the Zoom's buttons.

For that reason, I''d grab a DR-100, or the DR-70D, from Tascam, for two and four channel solutions - the DR-70D also does Dual recording, so inputs 1&2 can be double down to 3&4 at up to 12dB lower lever, so if a transient sound peaks on 1, it's good on 3.

Now, for the total-hack-first-outing-special,.... grab a Zoom H1, set it to auto-levels, screw it on to the end of a mic stand or boom pole, and go practise.
Second time out, set it manual levels, and learn to swing the boom for loud dialog.

And ALWAYS monitor with a good set of headphones.

Torsten: Pentax K-01 owner here - I feel your pain,..
But, Video menu, Manual Iris/shutter/speed, SR OFF !!, and use SMC Primes :)
You've got 13 stops in video to play with - Pentax encodes to 125% IRE and -20% IRE, and preserves that data, so you can recover highlights in YUV curves tools.
Shame about the data rate tho'.
And the rolling shutter performance is better then 5D2 or BMPocketCam

November 12, 2015 at 11:48PM, Edited November 12, 11:48PM

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Stewart Fairweather
Cinematographer
185

I like listening to music when I write my argumentative essay. I usually read https://homework-writer.com/blog/argumentative-essay-outline before writing.

April 25, 2018 at 9:35AM

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