February 26, 2015 at 12:31PM

8

Buying new camera. Keep lenses?

Hello fellow NFS-friends!

I have been working with a Canon 5D Mark III for the last two years or so, and as you might understand I was also working with DSLRs before that. Now I am slowly planing to invest some money into my business by buying a new camera (probably a FS7).

My question is now, when I actually sell my 5D Mark III should I also sell the lenses. This is probably a obvious question, because I only own a 50mm L-series lens... or is it?

Since I only have one lens, does it make sense to put money into buying an adapter and keep buying L-series lenses (or so), or should I just dump my whole kit and buy EVERYTHING new?

How would you go about doing this?
What gear do you recommend (particularly lenses)?
Any other advice?

Thats all folks!

Thanks!

11 Comments

I would keep your lens and buy the Metabones EF to Sony adapter because...

- You might want to rent other Canon lenses to shoot with
- The adapter will be easy to sell if you change your mind later on
- Cine glass costs a fortune, so you are either going to buy expensive new Sony glass, or use Canon or Nikon glass with adapters
- The Canon 50mm L lens is a great lens to own

February 26, 2015 at 6:29PM

3
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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
32727

So, I shouldn't invest in some cheaper cinema lenses... Like Rokinon or Tokina or what they are called?

February 27, 2015 at 5:34AM

11
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Viktor Ragnemar
Director/Cinematographer
1083

The Samyang lenses ( this is the main company that makes all of these cheap cine lens brands ) are retro-fitted DSLR lenses and their performance varies quite a bit. I don't see these as being any better than using DSLR lenses directly, and in some cases they are optically inferior to the better quality lenses from Canon or Nikon.

Real cine lenses cost a fortune. ( $4K and up )

Guy McLoughlin

February 27, 2015 at 8:13AM

Keep the lenses.

February 27, 2015 at 7:27AM

3
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Ragüel Cremades
Film producer and director
7705

Okey, thank you guys very much!

February 27, 2015 at 8:33AM

11
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Viktor Ragnemar
Director/Cinematographer
1083

L-series are a quality stills lens, but with your FS700 you might want to consider the Rokinon cine primes purely for the de-clicked iris control and built in gear teeth for a follow focus. These are a very nice features for a cheap cine prime and will make working on set a lot more practical.

Personally, I'm not a huge fan of the cheap cine primes, but a friend of mine has a set to go with his 5d MkIII and swears by them.

Hope this helps, Ben
Director/Producer, Global Pictures
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February 28, 2015 at 4:25AM, Edited February 28, 4:25AM

0
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Ben Kumanovski
Director | Cinematographer
314

You will eventually need an other lense than the 50mm only, knowing that the FS7 has a 1.6x crop sensor compare to the 5D, your 50mm will look like an 80mm, which is good for portrait but not very usefull for the rest. Canon lenses are great, but sony lenses takes more adventages of the automatism of the FS, if you want to use autofocus, motorised zoom or even the stabilisation sony lenses will work better. That said the 50mm is great if you can afford to keep it while buying other lenses that would be the best option.

March 1, 2015 at 5:17PM

4
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AvdS
1247

I would keep the Canon lenses (especially if you have a good set 24 - 35- 50 - 85 - 100) and also get the 28-135mm FE lens.

The Canon Ls (with adapter) will give be great for big projects - while the 28-135 f4 zoom will be great for events and quick shots.

March 1, 2015 at 7:25PM, Edited March 1, 7:25PM

2
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Heri Rakotomalala
DP/Camera, Studio owner, Associate Producer
375

So now that I settled with keeping the lens what would you people consider to be the best lens to buy next?

I think a 35mm must be the best shot, or am I wrong? Of course it depends on what I shot but it still feels like the most versatile. Or maybe even a 24mm.

March 3, 2015 at 3:21AM

8
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Viktor Ragnemar
Director/Cinematographer
1083

For primes I would check out the 24mm lens, which will have the field of view of a wide-normal on the FS7. ( equivalent to a 35mm lens on a Full Frame camera )

Otherwise, you might want to take a look at the Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 zoom that is fast, wide, and can be mounted on a SpeedBooster to make it even faster and wider.

Guy McLoughlin

March 3, 2015 at 8:37AM

Unless your Canon L series lens has extraordinarily low resale value, sell it. Its OIS and (I assume on the FS7) autofocus will be useless, those two things being responsible for a lot of the cost of the lens. Also, I assume that your 5D internally compensates for that specific lens' optical flaws like CA (http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/canon-5d-mkiii/canon-5d-mkiiiA4.HTM), which means that there may be a slight drop off in quality once you use it on a non-Canon body. Also, I believe you'll need a pretty pricey adapter if you want to be able to control aperture.

There are plenty of lenses that rival or exceed the optical performance of Canon L series lenses, and most of such lenses cost less, especially if they have inferior stabilization or autofocus performance.

March 3, 2015 at 7:39PM

2
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Jaan Shenberger
designer/animator & live-action director/DP
1267

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