December 29, 2017 at 1:12PM

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Does a way to emulate 70mm film look for free exist?

As I wrote in the title, I'd like to have colors like Dunkirk and the Hateful Eight for my videos for free. Thanks for your time

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http://www.cineplus.ch/vistalut.html They claim "VistaLUT doesn't pretend to replicate a film size... but it represents the 70mm color timing culture." Strangely, I didn't like their example videos. I thought skin tones were too bright but that might be just me.

Basing your colour grading around a film emulation LUT may be the way to go. Also NFS had an article a while back that had a giveaway of LUTs that matched the looks of certain films. https://nofilmschool.com/2015/08/7-free-luts-based-iconic-movie-looks-pl...

December 29, 2017 at 2:58PM, Edited December 29, 2:58PM

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Julian Richards
Film Warlord
1248

there is no procedure to use the colors of an image and apply them in a video?

December 29, 2017 at 3:17PM

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SimoneZ
69

A LUT is probably as good as it gets. Assuming that you are using software like Davinci Resolve, the LUT file is put in the LUT directory so that you can then apply it to a clip. That will transform from your source image A to your target image B but for that to give you the result you want, you have to be quite specific what A is. If the LUT assumes that you have a flat log image or a Rec 709 then that is what you must give it. My personal favourite group of LUTs are a set that takes Cinestyle flat video from my Canon camera and emulates two types of Fuji film stock and two of Kodak.

It does sound (and maybe is) very daunting and there's clever folks here tutting at my rather Neanderthal methods but Resolve is free and many of the LUTs are too.

December 29, 2017 at 4:53PM

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Julian Richards
Film Warlord
1248

In your opinion, could the Sedona LUT be similar to 70mm, in terms of colors?

SimoneZ

December 30, 2017 at 6:38AM

https://www.kingroot-apk.com/
That will transform from your source image A to your target image B but for that to give you the result you want, you have to be quite specific

December 30, 2017 at 2:02AM

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The Sedona LUT does look quite nice. What input does it take?

Julian Richards

December 31, 2017 at 4:08PM

There’s an issue here of lazy vagueness. 70mm is a format not a stock, what stock are you talking about 500t is different than 50d, do some research. What camera format are you on that matters too. I would figure out how to start building your own lut, you don’t know how these random lut sites make their luts, spend the time to study the 70mm images you like, where are blue sky’s on the vector scope where are skintones, grade your cameras log to get to the same place, do the work yourself that’s the only way you will know it works.

December 31, 2017 at 3:16PM, Edited December 31, 3:16PM

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Indie Guy
1139

It is rather. We must assume that he is after look regarding colours after. He seems to have wanted to keep things as simple as possible and you may have well blown his mind. There is a Hateful 8 LUT. https://triunestore.com/products/triune-color-western-luts and several Dunkirk inspired LUTs.

Can I pick your brains? In the Hateful 8 LUT promo video, the guy tweaks the image before applying the LUT. Does that screw up what the LUT is expecting as an input?

Julian Richards

December 31, 2017 at 4:18PM

Right he's after the colors, and they should study the color reproduction of film and the color reproduction of digital. Perhaps its better if his mind does get blown, that the only way to get some knowledge in there. New filmmakers want someone to do the work for them and package it in a free turnkey solution. As a millennial filmmaker, I'm embarrassed by this.

Theres nothing wrong with color grading the image before sending it through the lut, but those luts just look like global color corrections and not a remapping of the color space to match the color reproduction of film. But when you selling to a demographic that has never shot on film and is too lazy to study it, you can sell anything as film emulation.

January 1, 2018 at 12:12PM, Edited January 1, 12:13PM

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Indie Guy
1139

He did do some research. He went to a web site called "No Film School" and asked a reasonable question, for God's sake. Some of what you offered was reasonable advice, including had you phrased it in a less snot-nosed way, information that there are different kinds of 70mm stocks and formats. New filmmakers have to go through a lot of junk, they shouldn't have to be afraid of asking questions, lest the comic book store guy from the Simpsons decides to troll them with hack snobbery.

J Robbins

January 6, 2018 at 1:11AM, Edited January 6, 1:11AM

Also consider that a look is as much if not even more so, created in the production design of the movie. It's in the choice of location, the clothes the people wear, the surroundings, choosing to shoot in overcast weather or bright sunlight.

Afterwards, it's pretty easy to create your own lut and apply it across the board, but your initial starting point will benefit your finished look the most.

Davinci can export 3D luts that you can export and use in fx. Premiere. Which means, if you shoot some demo footage at your location, you could go home and sit and play around with the look in Davinci, and then when you are happy, you have a nice starting point for your movie.

You could also look into how to get grain into your footage. But be careful. Some grain is way better than others and sometimes, you still have to dial down the opacity of the grain layer to make it look good.

What you need to look at is:
- How are the shadows behaving? Do they have a tint? Are they crushed?
- How are the midtones behaving? Great contrast? Flat? Have a tint? Are the midtones dominated by colors that are due to the choice of fx. clothes, objects surroundings?
- How are the highlights behaving? Are they far from white? Do they roll of softly and white out in specular objects? Do they have a tint?

You can learn a lot from playing around, even with novel footage.... and of course, YT has a lot of videos about grading in a specific way.

January 3, 2018 at 9:09AM, Edited January 3, 9:11AM

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Torben Greve
Cinematographer
872

Not free, but one of the best ways to emulate motion-picture film stock...
https://www.filmconvert.com/features/film-stocks

January 3, 2018 at 4:48PM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
29761

There really isnt a free way to do this. But there is cheap. Slap an anamorphic projector lens onto your regular lens and get the softness of the images and then apply a grain while actually filming in an aspect ration made for the format youre trying to emulate.

Dont stop experimenting.

January 8, 2018 at 8:32PM

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Chris Hackett
Director, Director of Photography, Writer
1055

https://terrariumtvapks.com/
This is great news for Terrarium TV fans because the experience ...

April 17, 2018 at 10:34AM

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