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Watch 'The Making of Aliens' and Learn Everything You Need to Know About the Film, Mostly

AliensAliens is one of those movies that I can plop down and watch anywhere, any time. It has a classic story structure that always seems to allay even my most stubborn hipster propensities — as aliens are jumping out of people’s chests. In this behemoth of a documentary (3 hours, guys!) we get to see everything that went into making Aliens, from the construction of the APC to the Queen her slobbering self. The doc is packed with great information on the scripting, set building, and shooting of the film, so free up a block of your time and check it out after the jump.


The documentary is called Superior Firepower: The Making of ‘Aliens’and the thing I really like about it is how thorough it is. The filmmakers are so detailed when they share information and stories about the film that, even if you didn’t have the budget or the crew to make a film like Aliens, you’d at least know more than a few tricks to make something similar (kind of.)

For instance, Lance Henriksen, who plays the android Bishop in the film, tells a story about how the mixture for his blood went bad and he got food poisoning. He reveals, though, that it was made with milk and yogurt. These are the questions that have stayed with me throughout my childhood and into adulthood — not even being sarcastic. I always wondered what Bishop’s blood was made of, what the Queen’s slobber was made of, how the filmmakers made the Queen move.

And speaking of that, the creation of the Queen is especially interesting. We’re given a full rundown on everything that went into making her: the research and development, James Cameron’s old test footage of an early prototype, and each intricate hydraulic or puppeted control that made the Queen move.

Check out the documentary below:

What did you think of the documentary? What information surprised you? Let us know in the comments.

[via Filmmaker IQ]

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