September 16, 2013

Why We Shot a Teaser for My First Feature Film 'CENTS' a Year Before Making the Feature

Here on NFS, I have been fortunate to share screenwriting lessons I have learned from professional screenwriters as well some of my own experiences as I strive to hone my craft. I'm also a regular reader of NFS, learning so much about all areas of filmmaking and the industry from my fellow NFS writers. Today, I'm excited to share with you a recently released teaser for CENTS, which will be my first feature film. The thing is, we haven't made the film yet. So, in addition to sharing the teaser with you, I'd like to tell you why we shot a teaser before actually shooting the feature film.

The Pitch

Before we get to the teaser, let me tell you a little bit about story. CENTS is the story of Sammy, an uncommonly smart twelve-year-old girl who uses her gift for mathematics and enlists her frenemies to revamp the school penny drive into a major moneymaking operation. As Sammy steers the penny drive scheme to her own advantage, she struggles in her relationships with her single mother – who tries to keep Sammy from repeating her own mistakes – and her math teacher – who attempts to nurture Sammy's mathematical prowess despite her resistance.

As I've mentioned here on NFS before, CENTS was a 2012 Academy Nicholl Fellowship in Screenwriting semifinalist. CENTS is also currently in the second round of the 2014 Sundance Institute Screenwriting Lab selection process.

The Evolution of the Story

According to my story notes, I came up with the original concept for CENTS back in 2009. I pursued the story in earnest in the second half of 2010, starting the first draft of the screenplay in late 2010 and finishing it in January 2011. After a few initial rewrites, the story of CENTS wouldn't let go of my imagination. By the fall of 2011, I decided I would make it as my feature film debut (I actually write for NFS today because I discovered this website as part of my research on Kickstarter in 2011). I rewrote CENTS extensively in early 2012, which led to the Nicholl semifinalist placement, while I researched avenues for financing.

Why Shoot a Teaser?

Before I get into the reasons why we shot a teaser for CENTS, let's take a look at the teaser itself:

I mainly decided to shoot a teaser because I wanted to create a mood/tone film that was specific to the story that would convey the style of the film and a hint of the A-story. I had several more specific goals in mind when putting together the teaser:

  • Build an audience for CENTS before making the film: Putting together the initial audience for CENTS now will help us make the film by demonstrating demand to potential investors, preparing our initial audience for a successful Kickstarter campaign, and spreading the word about an upcoming feature film that focuses on girls, mathematics and relational aggression (bullying.)
  • Create a short piece to show potential investors the tone and visual style of the future feature film: Most people don't want to read a screenplay. Even professional screenwriters don't typically want to read someone else's screenplay. Even if a potential investor wants to read one, understanding how the screenplay turns into the final film is a skill that most people outside of the film industry don't possess. Potential investors want to see what the movie will be. The teaser gives them a taste for the visual style and the mood of CENTS in 90 seconds -- an amount of time most people are willing spend to consider the story for a new film.
  • Demonstrate progress to the TFI Sloan Filmmaker Fund before reapplying for a grant this year: Last year, my fellow producer Ella Sitkin and I submitted CENTS for a grant from the Tribeca Film Institute Sloan Filmmaker Fund. While we didn't get the grant, TFI contacted us throughout their decision-making process to get updates on our project and encouraged us to reapply this year after we make some more significant progress. We've finished our business plan, launched our LLC, invested our own money, reached out to potential investors and planned a future Kickstarter campaign. The teaser sits at the heart of all of these activities to demonstrate progress. The teaser is progress.

How to Tease a Story in 90 Seconds

With only approximately 90 seconds, no dialogue and no voiceover, it is impossible to tell the whole story of CENTS. In fact, very important supporting characters who are prominently featured in the screenplay and crucial to Sammy’s journey, including Sammy’s mother and her mathematics teacher, aren’t in the teaser, because it’s simply too much information. Logistically, it also would have meant finding additional talent, and I really wanted to focus my directing efforts on our young cast.

I created a shot list of approximately 20 shots, which ultimately became mini-scenes, plucked from the A-story of CENTS. Again, I didn’t plan to tell the whole story, but instead wanted to tease the story just enough to pique viewers' interest and stir their emotions. Also, by creating shots from story beats throughout the entire script, the teaser gives the sense of a complete film, which we hope will help supporters and potential investors get a sense of the future feature.

One drawback to this approach, however, is some people think we’ve already completed the film! That means we have to work extra hard to get the message out around the teaser that we still need to make CENTS, and we need our audience's help to spread the word.

No Dialogue, No Voiceover

I imagined this as a true teaser in the style of teasers that only show audiences a series of images along with music with no dialogue or voiceover to evoke certain emotions and pique viewers’ curiosity. I also wanted to get people to visit our website and start building an audience for CENTS -- if we pique their curiosity sufficiently, then hopefully people will come to the website to learn more about the story. If people come to the website to learn more about the story, hopefully they will join our mailing list, spread the word and help us make CENTS. Also, since I actively promote myself first and foremost as an aspiring screenwriter, I wanted the focus of the teaser to be visual to get supporters to think of me as a director as well.

The advantage of no dialogue on set meant the ability to shoot MOS and move quickly between setups. The disadvantage of no dialogue was the challenge for our young lead actresses to give realistic, emotional reactions on camera. To help our young talent, I wrote very short dialogue exchanges to get on-camera reaction shots. We also specifically used the end of takes after their dialogue to get the emotional beats we wanted without words.

Why Not Shoot a Short Film Instead of a Teaser?

That is a great question and I think shooting a short to generate interest in a feature is a great approach. Just check out Ryan’s excellent short film AMATEUR, a prequel to his feature MANCHILD. Many of my favorite independent films followed this strategy (Bottle Rocket, Raising Victor Vargas, Gowanus, Brooklyn leading to Half Nelson, plus many others).

I’m personally investing money in the feature film CENTS. For my particular case, I weighed my options and I decided that the money and time I would spend making a prequel short for it would be better spent on the feature itself. This led to the idea of shooting a teaser, working with my producer Ella, our director of photography Corey Weintraub, and our editor Reuben Finkelstein, to make a piece that would help us get the movie made without spending a ton of money.

I am sincerely grateful for their efforts as well as the hard work of our talented young cast and crew to make this teaser. Please check out our entire cast and crew credit list so they get the recognition they deserve.

'We', Not 'I': Making CENTS, the Feature Film

This post is full of sentences that begin with 'I'. Yes, I did write the screenplay and yes, I plan to direct the feature film, but the film and the teaser like all film projects are collaborative efforts. The eager, hard-working crew for the teaser doesn't exist without our producer Ella. The wonderful profile shot of Sammy reflected in the whiteboard, her mind illuminated by the "sun" doesn't happen without our DP Corey. The reimagined progression of the story in the teaser's montage doesn't materialize without our editor Reuben. The performances on-screen don't come to life without our talented cast. The feature film CENTS doesn't happen without the support of many, many people.

Our goal is to put together the financing for CENTS from a variety of sources -- from investors to Kickstarter to grants to my own wallet -- over the next several months. You can help. Please check out our website here. Join our mailing list for updates on our progress. Spread the word. Help us make CENTS.

What strategies have you used to pitch your future feature film to potential investors, grant organizations and target audiences? Do you have (constructive) criticism for our story and approach? Share your thoughts on the CENTS teaser and your own experiences in the comments.

Link: CENTS website

Your Comment

41 Comments

So what if you learn a new 'trick' after the teaser is out (ie camera trick, effects, editing style, or even color tone/mood) and is different compare to your teaser. how do you put them in together? will it mess things up?

September 16, 2013 at 9:51AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Hey Zul,

That's a good question. I see the teaser both as a mood/tone piece and a proof of concept. Because the actual film will have so many different camera setups, locations, characters, etc., we'll obviously have new and different techniques that aren't included in the teaser itself. But my guiding principles as they relate to the story won't really change. The teaser was a great way to test these principles in action with the camera and talent. Now, in addition to a mood/tone piece and a proof of concept, I also have actual experience and knowledge from the teaser that will inform my decisions and my collaborations with the cast and crew when we make the feature.

September 16, 2013 at 11:33AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Christopher Boone
Writer
Writer/Director

I've created teasers for my short and feature films, one of the most important reason is to gauge audience participation and interest, and which kinda become a focus group study, while at the same time, I would create several teasers versions catering to the interest groups, for example, we went and shot a teaser for The Rapture feature, shot in 2004 with DVCPRO50 because we thought HD wasn't kicking off well yet, and we ended up release the feature in 2007 (when HD went wild), our film however, was fortunate enough to be sold to Japan, Serbia, Thailand, Germany, recently to UK and China. The success is due to the amount of interest we got during the teaser process, our teaser was mostly interesting/intriguing shots about what we can do back in 2004: Wire stunt work, martial arts, cg, locations, etc. it even won a Telly. lol The teaser helped bring an interest to a sales agent to wanting to represent the film, and once the film was done, he signed an agreement. Unlike other sales agents, this one and a few other I know, at least pay me when he gets paid (obviously with a % deal), so I at least saw the $. The film sadly because it is shot in SD, we thought it's life cycle would be gone, but so far this year, it was sold to 2 countries, not bad for a lousy SD film shot in 2004 (if I would 've done it now, I would definately have better of everything) lol but I ain't George Lucas. :P

September 16, 2013 at 10:17AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Johnny

Thanks for sharing your experience with teasers before shooting films, Johnny. Your ability to generate interest in the feature film and continued success in selling the film to various territories over a long period of time is certainly encouraging.

September 16, 2013 at 11:35AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Christopher Boone
Writer
Writer/Director

Whatever happened to the movie Manchild that you did the kickstarter campaign for? did you give up on that one?

September 16, 2013 at 12:12PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Richard

Ryan Koo isnt the only guy posting on NFS

September 16, 2013 at 12:51PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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We're making it! We're at IFP No Borders this week with MANCHILD. Actually working on a post about that right now...

September 16, 2013 at 2:05PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Ryan Koo
Founder
Writer/Director

Also, a big thanks to Ryan for asking me to write a post about the CENTS teaser after it went live. And another big thanks for creating nofilmschool in the first place where can write about our filmmaking adventures and learn from one another.

September 16, 2013 at 2:35PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Christopher Boone
Writer
Writer/Director

Hi Chris,
A couple of really honest critiques:

1. This particular teaser may actually do you more harm than good.
2. I wasn't convinced the acting is going to be good. In the frenemy shots, I got the impression they were overacting. (the lip bite in the bathroom, the smug look of satisfaction in reaction). This is over-telegraphed emotion. Have the actors dial it down 75%. Instead of a lip-bite, make it a lip twitch. Etc.
2B. the shot of her pocketing a couple of rolls of pennies seems like it was a shot that was designed to be only one thing, to live in isolation. In reality, she wouldn't act that way, she's go someplace private to pocket pennies. the shot lingers in the teaser, and the acting breaks down, she doesn't have anything else "to-do" so she just sits there, awkwardly. it's not authentic.
3. The camera angles and the editing spoke of "shooting for coverage" instead of shooting with intentionality in mind. Lack of storyboard, lack of compositional frames.
3A. the use of camera focal lengths were random, at times wide, at times telephoto. They didn't communicate throughout the teaser a consistent vision. (paranoia or heroism)
3B. the lighting and grade was "too pretty" it felt DSLR, and polished, i think it needs a little more grit and realism.
3C. The camera angle of choices where intimacy is necessary, (looking across the school lunchroom) does not effectively portray intimacy. If they need to make a secret pact, then, yes, bring the camera closer. An overt turning of the head in the lunchroom, made her look like an extra, while the blondes in front where the focus. Perhaps they walk past her in front of school, and while the others make fun of her, the future accomplice turns her head and lingers. The same idea, but communicated with a more dynamic camera movement, and structure 1,2,3 choreography of the talent. If this then > that logic tree.
4. The last shot where the penny lands is on angle to the viewer, it does not communicate "cents", the camera should be perpendicular to the penny.
5. The music sounds canned, and overly designed to pull heart strings where no emotional connection has been met. Try stringing three music tracks together for a miniature act I, II and III.
6. Story structure/editing, we need to establish her as a character first, her brilliance, her tortured ego, her need for the money, the frenemies aspect is almost coincident to her motivations.
7. Cents should be woven throughout the teaser, "cents dropping in buckets", to act as visual breaks and a method of pacing the shots, and traversing time. "the bucket slowly fills up"
8. The payoff should be when she ends up filling a coinstar machine. this is an opportunity for unusual camera work, perhaps POV coins falling onto a goPro?
9. We need to establish more conflict, what's her motivation? She seems like a scammer who has everything in short order by the way she is portrayed selling candy/ contraband? at the beginning.

The good:
1. The one shot that you use as your thumbnail is great. The second shot that comes after it is also not bad, but the whiteboard needs to be filled with more, much more, and populated in a somewhat frenetic display of activity, not populated in such a structured manner. The shot is sped up in your teaser, which doesn't not time-remap well.

September 16, 2013 at 12:56PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Robert Thorpe

Hi Robert,

Thanks for your detailed constructive criticism of the teaser. I realize you didn't like the teaser, but I do appreciate the time and energy you spent explaining exactly what you didn't like about the teaser and how you would have done it differently. You offer really interesting alternatives to the shot designs and their execution, which would certainly have created a very different teaser. Everyone's vision is unique, and it's great to have a community like NFS to share, discuss and learn from each other's visions. Again, much appreciated analysis.

September 16, 2013 at 2:32PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Christopher Boone
Writer
Writer/Director

Robert - I feel quite similarly to you about this teaser/project and want to commend you on a good job of articulating your thoughts in a constructive way. I learned a ton of what I know about photography brutal critique from a now gone online site, and I'm actually going to the wedding of someone from the forum next month. This sort of thing build a legitimate community. It'd be great if there was a forum where critique like this could exist. Perhaps by invite or with limited membership. Anyway good job on your (hopefully) helpful post.

September 16, 2013 at 2:41PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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I agree entirely with each point.

September 16, 2013 at 4:17PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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MIke C

Wow. What a nice critic... Really constructive.

September 16, 2013 at 5:15PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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alex mand

Constructive criticism it may be but that doesn't mean to say it's correct. You practically dissed everything about Christopher's trailer. I think there's a good story there. And many of your points are pure opinion as opposed to showing technical prowess.

I wouldn't take the advice of a 'talkback expert' to heart, unless said person can post a link to a critically acclaimed film they themselves directed or shot. Otherwise, why would you want to follow their advice?
Stick to your guns and make the film your way, Christopher. You're obviously smart enough to do it.

September 17, 2013 at 7:41AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Heyzeus

Thanks, Heyzeus. One of the many skills I believe a good filmmaker needs is to be able to listen to and analyze criticism. I'm used to criticism as an aspiring screenwriter - everyone has suggestions on what you should change in a script. Some people think listening to criticism is hard, especially if the person offering the criticism disagrees sharply with your vision.

Certainly listening to tough criticism can be difficult, but the real challenge for a filmmaker lies in understanding which criticisms actually improve your own vision and which criticisms don't. If someone is on the same wavelength as me, I find their criticism very valuable because it usually gets to the heart of what is bothering me with my screenplay or film. If someone has a very different approach, I may find that buried within their criticism is a kernel that I could adopt for my project and the rest is merely their opinion.

Posting a teaser like this on NFS by necessity means I have to be ready to hear criticism from all angles. And I welcome constructive criticism such as that offered by Robert. That doesn't necessarily mean I agree with what Robert says or that I will adopt Robert's suggestions, even if they are seconded by others in the NFS community.

What I will do is read Robert's criticisms carefully and thoughtfully. I will ask myself if they align with my vision of the project and could they improve the project based on that vision. If yes, then maybe I should make that change. If no, then I should stick to my vision and recognize that my work ultimately may not work for the person offering the criticism.

And that is more than fine with me.

September 17, 2013 at 8:09AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Christopher Boone
Writer
Writer/Director

It's not just a matter of "vision". It's a matter of effective storytelling principles, techniques and craft.
Robert has given you tremendous input.
I look at your trailer and find it very amateurish. Robert's tips are giving you a headstart on how to improve yourself.

September 20, 2013 at 9:22PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Brody

I've bookedmarked this article for reference due to your outstanding critique. Great job on the trailer.

September 17, 2013 at 11:51AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Jorge

lol

September 17, 2013 at 12:02PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Heyzeus

I'm going to tip toe through this comment but here goes:

Yes, that's an outstanding critique of the "Cents" teaser. Your professionalism is leagues ahead of most commenters on the internet and especially on this web site.

But I think your feedback misses the point. This piece of "Cents" aims to set a mood accurate to what the feature will attempt to emulate. Let me not speak for him, but my takeaway is not that Chris Boone is aiming for perfection, but a feeling. A response.

Also, this is specifically aimed at investors, not at other filmmakers. Not all investors make films and because of that, they won't be judging his light levels and color correcting skills. They're looking for something to invest their money in; something that looks like it will bring money their way in the future.

That said, Boone is already leagues ahead of the majority because he actually shot something. Being able to show a sample of your film already puts you above most aspiring filmmakers. That's the message here.

September 17, 2013 at 8:52PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Thanks, Eddy. You understood my intentions perfectly and summed them up very nicely.

September 17, 2013 at 10:55PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Christopher Boone
Writer
Writer/Director

I know its a bit off topic but I noticed the APD cruiser in one of your shots, did you shoot in NM and if so why?
Thanks

September 16, 2013 at 1:59PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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David

Hey David,

Good pickup there. Yes, that is an APD cruiser. We did shoot in NM because I live in Albuquerque :) This whole film will be shot and edited in New Mexico - a great state for filmmaking. I welcome NFS filmmakers to make their movies here, we have a great crew and talent base, plus the 25% Refundable Film Production Tax Credit (30% for TV series, like Breaking Bad & Longmire).

September 16, 2013 at 2:28PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Christopher Boone
Writer
Writer/Director

I'm so glad you wrote this article Chris!

I like your teaser and the teaser approach, I was thinking I would do a short for my soon to be completed feature script, but you have me thinking, that a greatly executed teaser would be less cash and time consuming... At least for the script I'm working on. Cause every film has it's own organic demands of course.

Myself as a future film maker, I have always believed in creating an online/offline community around your film before going on to websites like Kickstarter.com. Because if you already have a following before hand, then the new found fans/investors will just be an added support to what you've already amassed before introducing it to crowd funding platform.

This beats coming to Kickstarter with no following at all (especially as an unknown new filmmaker) and trying hard to convince people your film is worth funding. At least with an already growing community as your word of mouth-BUZZ propagating machine, you have a better chance in inspiring many to invest in your future film (Assuming they also find the teaser compelling enough, of course).

Community is key FOUNDATION! And leading people to your website before the film is made is extremely wise.

IMHO, Kickstarter should be secondary priority to your website... I truly believe that. I look forward to seeing your film after it's made, because It will!

I'll be signing up for news letters from your website to stay up to date with your progress.

Be well Mr. Boone!

September 16, 2013 at 2:23PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Ramaatis

Thanks, Ramaatis. I'm glad you appreciate the post and the approach we are taking to building our audience for CENTS. Every film is a collaborative effort, and now more than ever, I think independent filmmakers need to rely on their audiences to help get their movies made. I look forward to sharing lessons learned during our process of getting CENTS made both with the NFS community and the growing audience for CENTS.

September 16, 2013 at 2:39PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Christopher Boone
Writer
Writer/Director

Well done for making it this far, it's quite an achievement and thanks for sharing. Hope you are able to make the feature, I look forward to hearing more about the process.

I agree with some of the other comments that I think you could really squeeze a lot more out of this teaser just by re-doing the music. There's not really any build with it at the moment

Best of luck!

September 16, 2013 at 4:50PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Luke R

Thanks for your feedback, Luke. I look forward to sharing more about our progress as we move forward.

September 16, 2013 at 11:45PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Christopher Boone
Writer
Writer/Director

Always enjoy your articles Mr. Boone. Good luck to you, sir!

September 16, 2013 at 5:50PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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bob

Thanks, Bob. Much appreciated.

September 16, 2013 at 11:44PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Christopher Boone
Writer
Writer/Director

Everybody is a DJ. What im saying is this...With all the technology getting more affordable....you will see more of these so called ... 'cinematic trailers' and whatnot. I'm sorry Chris, i seem like a nice guy , you respond fast & polite, and all this, but this feature is erhm kinda..... Jees i wish i could use the same words as Robert Thorpe, but i can't. No need to be polite. It is actually worse then a local television demo. And the way you are thanking everybody i think your talent lies within another territory. PR Maybe?

September 16, 2013 at 6:02PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Tomski

PR is definitely one of the many skills an independent filmmaker needs to have in his/her arsenal these days, so it's good to know I've got that one covered :)

September 16, 2013 at 11:44PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Christopher Boone
Writer
Writer/Director

lol @Tomski, you are commenting on someone who is achieving, like it or not.

September 17, 2013 at 12:06PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Heyzeus

Yeah, everyone's also a critic. It's always easier to tear down someone else's work to make you feel better about what you are not achieving. Just reading comments on the internet these days helps reinforce the criticism that I have that most people will hate just about everything and go out of their way to make sure that everyone knows it.

Chris, good luck in getting this feature made. Just getting a teaser like this done is a tremendous accomplishment. Believing in what you are doing is how things get done. Make the movie that you want to see.

September 17, 2013 at 4:13PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Sunhawk

Thanks, Sunhawk. With the help of my cast and crew, I certainly will make the movie that I want to see. Hopefully, others will want to see that movie, too.

September 17, 2013 at 5:06PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Christopher Boone
Writer
Writer/Director

The only suggestion I'd make, if you really want this teaser to help you finance the feature, would be to highlight in the video the successes you've already achieved, including/especially the Nicholls semifinalist placing. Definitely adds credence to your project, and helps set it apart.

September 17, 2013 at 11:15AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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RJ Blooks

Hey RJ,

That's a good suggestion. We've released the teaser on our website (centsthemovie.com), which includes info about the Nicholl semifinalist status, Sundance Institute Screenwriting Lab second round and being a strong contender for a Tribeca Film Institute Sloan Filmmaker Fund grant - and encouraged to apply again this year after making progress. However, the information is highlighted in different places - on our front page, but only if you scroll down, in our story section, in our blog posts. So bringing some attention to it in the teaser itself may be worth considering.

In addition to getting people to watch the teaser online, I'm using it in face-to-face meetings and at small gatherings where I can pitch the project in more detail and can highlight the project's current recognitions.

September 17, 2013 at 3:46PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Christopher Boone
Writer
Writer/Director

One of the important things for me about this website is how it encourages us to learn, share and grow artistically. I think Robert's comment is very well articulated and contains some solid advice. I really like your enthusiasm bro but as Robert points out, the most important element this film lacks is authenticity. Camera angles and other details could be personal preferences but an organic storytelling and acting are pretty universal when it comes to good cinema. A feature is a big artistic investment and I'd wish someone like Robert to tear my script/trailer apart like this before I actually made it. Encouragement isn't so difficult to find, constructive criticism is.
@Brooks Reynols- +1 on the idea of a criticism forum.(even if it has a potential to go out of hand)

September 18, 2013 at 1:44PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Vikas

I have one cuestion. One thing is to make a film, but I want to know: What plans for the distruvution do you have, theatres, netflix, youtube?

September 19, 2013 at 3:10AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Erik R.s.P

I can tell you (from a purely non-filmaker perspective) that as the mother of a 12 year old girl, this teaser went over very well with her and her friends. I know they are not the target audience for fundraising, but they are definitely a target audience for the finished feature itself. Every one of them exclaimed (loudly I might add...) that they wanted to see the movie after watching the trailer.

September 19, 2013 at 1:31PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Mary

Hi Chris..
I thought it was well done, and like Mary said, there is a good market for that age range. Everyone is an artist, everyone is a critic..take what you need and move on. Robert..tell us how you really feel...sheesh, only one good point? Chris accomplished something that most people are merely dreaming about; good luck Chris.

September 20, 2013 at 8:35PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Monica D.

I agree with the approach of creating a teaser. The audience will get an idea about what you are trying to do.

The approach in the teaser need not be the final approach. If the filmmaker thinks that something needs to be changed, then he shouldn't stop doing it.

These days a lot of producers look for some kind of statistics like the number of video views etc to gauge the audience interest. So it is always a good idea to create a teaser and share it. One can also create multiple teasers at different times to further refine or throw more light on the topic. It will also serve as a good way of the team being collectively able to visualise the film. The director/editor/DoP can try new approaches which can appeal to different groups of people.

My personal films belong to a different genre than the assignments I take up as cinematographer. For my documentaries, I am using youtube to gauge the audience interest. The reason being fellow filmmakers can critique but for me the feedback of layman (target audience) is important. Prospective investors also appreciate the total number of hits one gets in youtube. Also, I get to know the views from various countries and can gauge which market to broadly target.

September 23, 2013 at 3:11AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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12:21 pm, February 14, 2013|When they just ripped off Freddy's crpeey chant for their other teaser I lost all hope that this game would have any originality or creativity. And there you go. Just look at the title.Of course, now the Freddy teaser makes even less sense. On a side note, I did think the sniper elite v2 demo was fun game, even if it wasn't very memorable, so this game will probably be at least mildly entertaining. I just wish they could come up with something besides zombies and guns.

March 21, 2014 at 7:31AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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