January 20, 2014

Which Cameras Were Used on the Oscar-Nominated Films of 2014? Hint: It's a Small List

OscarsWe all know that being a filmmaker means a lot more than having an awesome camera. However -- it doesn't hurt. But, how exactly do we gauge the awesomeness of cameras on the market? Well, that depends on your personal definition, but one way would be to look at what the Oscar-nominated filmmakers of 2014 used on their films. Setlife Magazine has shared a trove of technical specifications for the nominated films, including which cameras, lenses, film/digital negatives and prints were used, but let's just say -- one camera maker swept up nice and clean. Find out which one after the jump.

Okay -- it was ARRI. You probably guessed that. According to Setlife, their digital ALEXA and 35mm ARRIFLEX was used by nearly every single Cinematography, Directing, and Best Picture nominee. But the kicker here is not that these cameras were used by almost every nominee, but they were pretty much the only cameras used. Captain Phillips utilized a GoPro Hero3, The Grandmaster used the Phantom Flex, Her used a Canon C300, and The Wolf of Wall Street used a C500 -- but each of those films also used an ARRI camera. (And, uh -- where's RED?)

Things are much more diverse in the lens department: Canon, Zeiss, Nikon, Leica, Cooke, Panavision, Hawk, and Angenieux all made appearances. (For those of you wondering which vintage Canon lens was used on Spike Jonze's Her, it was a Canon K35 zoom.)

Setlife put together some helpful images that list the cameras and lenses used on all of the Oscar nominees for Cinematography, Directing, and Best Picture. Check them out below:

What are your thoughts on the cameras used to make this year's Oscar-nominated films? Does this overwhelming preference for ARRI's Alexa and Arricam say something about "choosing the right camera for the right project?" Share your thoughts in the comments below.

Links:

[via Cinescopophilia]

Your Comment

133 Comments

arri alexa…and arri lt…the best..

January 20, 2014 at 1:38PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DIO

There is a certain amount of soul searching going on in the RED forums at the moment, which is a fascinating read, varying from fanboy accustaions of corruption to some very intelligent and incisive thoughts.
http://www.reduser.net/forum/showthread.php?111338-What-do-you-think-abo...

January 20, 2014 at 1:41PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Saied

Saied said it best I think. Everyone I know in this town( LA) votes Alexa over anything RED at this point; myself included. The aesthetic is phenomenal and the ease of use and dailies workflow are down right easy breezy.

January 20, 2014 at 2:49PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Timbo

I agree with what you are saying but RED's workflow is damn good.

January 20, 2014 at 3:05PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Kraig

Im not really a Red fan but That is BS , sure 3 years ago red footage was not that easy to handle in Post but nearly every editing suite has suppory .

Ultimately I think Alexa won the early dynamic range battle as and
The industry stuck with a standard opposed to handling and workflow because technically the red is more compact interms of handling

January 20, 2014 at 4:55PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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jaye

Funny how so many people have Red on the brain. Any time there is a post about ARRI the conversation is mostly about Red. There's lots of other cameras not in the list of Best Movies. But everything goes Red in these ARRI posts. Odd that.

January 20, 2014 at 11:11PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gene

I wasn't meaning you in saying that jaye

January 21, 2014 at 4:15AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gene

As one of those people who's posted I think the soul searching was long overdue. I love my Epic, and I love the Alexa, but I don't feel one camera is better than the other, and would pick and choose my camera choices depending on the needs of the project.

But there's way too much fanboy BS going on. If RED wants to be successful they need to build the cameras we need, not necessarily the ones that look cool on the outside.

January 20, 2014 at 4:28PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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That was far too intelligent to be posted here. :-)

January 20, 2014 at 7:47PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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marklondon

Damnit...

January 20, 2014 at 7:59PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Lol, all of them are asshats.

January 21, 2014 at 1:42AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Tyler

Red boys think / hope that they could get more broadcasting jobs with new Red "ENG-camera setup". Problem is, this is were Sony, Canon and Arri reign. And people actually use the camera to do ordinary work. Sports, Nature etc.

It is a tool, not a extension of your "super-DP" ego. Also real reason why anything like has never been developed is simply that Jannard et al. think that they are too superiors for that kind mundane stuff...

Also, majority of the broadcasting Pros do not wan to have anything to do with Red.

January 21, 2014 at 2:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Juhan-i

super 16mm…poor man's arri alexa

January 21, 2014 at 4:11PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DIO

The fact is people from LA have posted in this forum time and time again indicating that the Alexa is the new standard. If Arri comes out the 4K model it will own the field again. They simply got it right with the Alexa, and cinematographers noticed instantly, making the change simply because they wanted to (instead of being forced). Better color rendition and incredible easy-of-use for a digital camera made it the success it is today.

Look at the stories of how difficult it was to work with the RED cameras in the beggining, and the way their dynamic range was so limited before DRAGON, and you can see why they're in the situation they're in. Cinematographers for the Oscar-nominated films for two years from now are planning their movie NOW, so only then will we probably see any recovery by the DRAGON sensor.

January 20, 2014 at 2:40PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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No Sony, no Panavision, no SI, no Panasonic, no Ikonoscop, no Nikon ... etc

January 20, 2014 at 2:41PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Kuk

No Blackmagic, no Magic Lantern

January 20, 2014 at 2:44PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Kuk

But PLENTY budget.

January 20, 2014 at 3:06PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Kraig

No shit... Are you trying to compare an Alexa to a DSLR?

January 20, 2014 at 6:18PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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maghoxfr

you're cool

January 21, 2014 at 12:18PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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themok

in sundance 2014…cameras so far…listed…

2 35mm (one arri and one panavision)
3 arri alexa
3 super 16mm
1 sony f3
1 red epic

January 20, 2014 at 2:46PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DIO

Interesting, where is this list?

January 21, 2014 at 4:05PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Corey

It's interesting to see the mix of digital vs. film to balance itself somewhat. IMO, it shows a lag between any camera's introduction and its use. Add in a normal production schedule and you pretty much look at a 2-3 year delay. It should get shorter, however, with the digital upgrade rather than a complete switch from film.

January 20, 2014 at 3:00PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DLD

I know that the BMCC 2.5k was used on the hunger games, that had a nomination some where for the sound track (I am seriously reaching here) :0)

January 20, 2014 at 3:08PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Do you have a link showing that to be accurate? Not trying to make accusations here, just can't find anything to back that up with a basic search :)

January 20, 2014 at 4:42PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Denver

It was written here http://shotonwhat.com/the-hunger-games-catching-fire-2013.html but it looks like its since been updated and the BMCC is no longer listed, so that's zero for the BMCC now :(

January 21, 2014 at 11:26AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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I wonder how complete this list is considering Scorsese talked at length in interviews about using the Phantom Flex for a handful of shots yet here it isn't mentioned.

January 20, 2014 at 3:12PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Kevin

I hate to say it, but in addition to the Alexa being a superb camera a lot of pros (especially the 'older' ones at the high end) were never very fond of Red's frat boy attitude. For a bunch of artist cinematographers are a relatively conservative, level headed crowd.

I know some people who don't care if Dragon gets 20 stops and makes you a cup of coffee in between takes. They won't go near a Red because of their image (JJ, the fan boys, skulls and tattoos, 'combat proven' gear, slamming competitors bla bla bla...). That is in addition to some shooters simply not liking the color science and dynamic range of the pre-Dragon cameras. So, once there was an alternative available, the market made its choice.

Sony has other problems. They are still haunted by the accusation that their cameras have a 'video' look. Which they do, if you don't treat sLOG properly in post (Sony's documentation is really bad). By all accounts the F65 is a truly brilliant camera, but it's expensive and 6k / 16bit RAW produces a truly massive amount of data.

January 20, 2014 at 3:15PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Erick

If you honestly think pros at this level pick equipment based on the attitudes of others who use them... then you win the award for conspiracy theories.

Pathetic.

January 20, 2014 at 4:32PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Greg egan

Speaking as someone who actually has worked in this business for a very long time I can assure you that how a company presents and conducts itself has an enormous impact on their relationship with their customers. Movie making is not a game. There is a lot of money and risk involved. A lot of that responsibility lands on the shoulders of the DOP, in which case working with mature adults buys an awful lot of peace of mind. No conspiracy there.

January 20, 2014 at 7:17PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Erick

I support you Erick.
When you said "relatively conservative" I would have gone with VERY conservative. At times, shockingly conservative.
I think it was one of the reasons Jannard finally got the message to kick himself upstairs and shut up. He's the Mark Cuban of the film industry, trying to buy a baseball team.

I think RED will find its niche with the DRAGON sensor, but its not going to get any serious foothold while Arri puts out great cameras. Their 4K sensor, which has been in high-level testing now for over 18 months, if its as good as the ALEXA will continue their domination at the studio/high-indie level. Personally the ALEXA Studio would be my first choice to shoot everything - from there on down its a compromise.

I'll say this again - if RED were a start-up not founded by a wealthy patron, they would be in real trouble as a business.

January 20, 2014 at 7:58PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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marklondon

Apparently, though, the only reason ARRI is going 4K is because of Red. There must be something of real substance to Red, no?

January 20, 2014 at 10:33PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gene

Whenever ARRI (or Arri, depending whether one refers to a brand name or a company) releases their 4K camera, their competitors would be left to compete only on the price. In that, Canon, Panasonic and Sony are fairly well positioned because they should be able to release a professional, feature laden 4K product for $15K-$20K. It won't be as good as F65 but it will be good enough for most everything but the big budget movies. They will also clean up in the lower tier prosumer/video enthusiast 4K market. Red will have a real battle on their hands because their niche of the last half a decade will be essentially gone.

January 21, 2014 at 2:59AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DLD

That may or may not be true.Time will tell.But what will their 4K camera do about the 6K Red Dragon. Maybe ARRI should think about an 8K camera next.

January 21, 2014 at 4:17AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gene

ARRI doesn't have to do anything about 6K. Red's niche in the digital movie production has been its high resolution - a huge edge over Alexa at this time - for the VFX flicks. If/when the new ARRI camera makes that difference negligible, Red will lose its main advantage but will still suffer from all the disadvantages - real or merely perceived - that have been afflicting the company. And when you eliminate (most of) the "pros" but retain (most of) the "contras", you have a real battle on your hands to just keep up. Looking at the high end pro market - Alexa, the expected Arri 4K camera and F65 will take a giant share there. F55 will grab a hold of the medium TV biz with Alexa still going strong there. Canon, Panasonic (and presumably more portable Sony pro 4K cameras) will fight it out for the area currently occupied by the C300, C500 and F5. The sub-$10K will be a free-for-all with the above names + JVC + Black Magic + Nikon. And, just as importantly, the accessories will face a severe price pressure and that's precisely where Red earns its dough. So, figure both lower volume and lower margins into the financials and things won't be looking rosy for Red.

January 21, 2014 at 11:48AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DLD

I actually prefer the look of the F65 over the Alexa although both are phenomenal cameras.

January 20, 2014 at 6:02PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Mikey

Choosing the right camera for the right project still holds true of course. The Alexa is more filmic and lends itself to the classic narrative look used in every one of those features. The Epic MX and Dragon both have a cleaner sharper image that lends itself better to certain kinds of narratives, certain kinds of doc work, and many other uses.
I own an Epic and love it dearly, but I'd most likely choose to shoot with an Alexa in a heartbeat if I were going to shoot a drama (and had the cash, It's still significantly more expensive for low budget peeps).

January 20, 2014 at 4:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Actually, on 'Her', a mixture of 35mm, Red and C300 were used. I attended the Q&A with Spike Jonze at the UK premiere and he talked about it.

January 20, 2014 at 4:45PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Matt Carter

We're moving towards a mix of cameras on most productions these days. Oblivion for example used the F65 to great effect, but the size of that camera prevented it from being used handheld, which is why the Epic-M was used for the 2-Tom fight sequence.

The ALEXA is a BIG camera, and sometimes that's prohibitive. Cameras are like hammers, they come in different sizes, for different tasks. If you think you can use a sledge hammer every-time, you're mistaken. As storytellers it's important we select the right gear for the right story.

January 20, 2014 at 4:51PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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It just turns out the right tool was never a crappy camera that is cheap, just the Alexa lol

January 20, 2014 at 6:26PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DocShooter

It's hardly a crappy camera. 2013 was a fantastic year for those that shot on RED. Lots of features and tv shows working on that platform, rendering beautiful imagery. I've used the Alexa, Epic, etc etc, and given the DP I've seen gorgeous imagery out of the Epic, and crap out of the Alexa. It's a tool, and it depends on who's using it.

January 20, 2014 at 6:31PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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What makes you think you know beauty?

January 20, 2014 at 7:40PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Derrard

I see you've played knifey/spooney before!

January 20, 2014 at 8:02PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Is that a capitulation? I'm glad you'll accept a surrender so easily despite our current presence on this here internet.

January 20, 2014 at 8:08PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Derrard

Are we playing for Internet Points? Can these be redeemed for real money?

In all seriousness I've seen DPs control the Epic and do some incredible work, just like I've seen some DPs make the Alexa look awful. I'm much more impressed by the DP using the tool, than the tool itself.

January 20, 2014 at 8:17PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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I think Alexa is absolutely the more appropriate camera for the feel of movies that are nominated for academy awards: smaller personal dramas, usually set in somewhere back in history, with minimal focus on digital effects. Well, all except Gravity which used robots as camera operators and had everything but the actors made digitally.

It is important to note that the academy voting for the awards is not a cross section of the movie going public.

"Oscar voters are nearly 94% Caucasian and 77% male, The Times found. Blacks are about 2% of the academy, and Latinos are less than 2%. Oscar voters have a median age of 62, the study showed. People younger than 50 constitute just 14% of the membership."

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/news/movies/academy/la-et-unmasking...

Keep that demographic in mind when academy award nominated films are compared.

January 20, 2014 at 6:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Dan

This info is interesting, but I'm not sure it warrants any broader conclusions. For one, it's hardly a valid sample size -- a small group of lauded and accomplished filmmakers from the Hollywood community whose budgets far exceed the median cost of a typical feature.

I think it would be more useful to see this info for a wider variety of films over a period of five years. Perhaps from similar categories across Cannes, Sundance, the Golden Globes, the Oscars, New York Film Festival, New Directors Film Festival, Toronto Film Festival and South By Southwest. That way, we'd have a larger, more diverse sample size and we could get a sense of whether there are any trends over time.

Or maybe it would make sense to look at this data for every film that got national theatrical distribution in the U.S.

January 20, 2014 at 6:08PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Shawn

I think its more surprising that a couple films opted out of RAW workflows, what does that tell ya?

January 20, 2014 at 6:30PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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ryan

It should be obvious that the time of the BMCCs has not started yet.
Sure, they´re out there, but the first serious long-form projects will be finished end of this year the earliest, more mid 2015 I would guess.
And seeing that in "indie-circles" even the F3 still gets used, shows another thing:
People who actually shoot narrative don`t necessarily care about the latest shii-at in camera technology, but want a reliable, proven workflow in which the camera it self only is one part of the equation.
So once a DoP gets his scene dialed into the zone, he may choose sth quiet ordinary to capture the image...
Oh and what says "connaisseur" more these days then going for the "real thing" again and shoot on film...

January 20, 2014 at 6:31PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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SpartaBear

There is a documentary about Sriracha hot sauce coming out very soon from IndyMogul. A GH3 and a GoPro were used to make it.

trailer: [ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-EUIov_eK2Y ]

January 21, 2014 at 4:32AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gene

I for one am very happy to see so many movies still being shot on film. I know the film vs. digital debate is all about personal opinion, and I much prefer the look of film. Despite the advancements in digital technology, I still can easily distinguish whether a movie was shot on film or digital.

I do also think it depends on the project though, as a movie like Gravity makes more sense to shoot digitally. For the most part though, I just love the look of film.

January 20, 2014 at 6:40PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Auston

I see a couple of C300's on there and a GoPro ... do you think if Captain Phillips wins Best Picture GoPro will add "Oscar Winning" to their marketing campaigns?

January 20, 2014 at 6:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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GoPro just won an Emmy for it's contributions to the television industry. 3:41 video of Nick Woodman's, inventor of GoPro, acceptance speech:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hOct5RbkZIo

January 20, 2014 at 7:23PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gene

Yes and only thing that really matters with little camera like GoPro in the end is the sensor.

And who made the sensor ?

Sony did.

So, in a way, Sony has done more for the "audiovisual world" than any company, especially during the whole GoPro dominance era.

January 21, 2014 at 2:32PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Juhan-i

Sensor itself is nothing without perfect firmware and image processing. Today its 50/50 %. Hardware is dead without good image and color science.

January 21, 2014 at 3:26PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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hawaj

Every sensor chip comes with "firmware" for basic processing. Not just API to read data out, but most likely even some examples for de-bayering etc.

And when comes to real meat, how well camera performs; resolution, dynamical range, noise levels vs. sensitivity and so on, it is all about the sensor.

If you have for example sensor with high noise ,you can filter it, but you will immediately lose certain about of resolution. For GoPro to achieve the image quality it has, sensor simply has to deliver.

Most likely Sony has not just sold the sensor to GoPro, they have done just like they do with their phone OEM deals, you get whole prosess in one integrated chip. Including processing units for data compression.

January 21, 2014 at 4:06PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Juhan-i

The list of "best" movies really is not all the best movies in one basket. When average, and even below average, movies in recent years like District 9, Michael Clayton, There Will Be Blood, Good Night and Good Luck, Erin Brockovich, The Kids Are All Right, and Milk are on the list it is palpable that Hollywood is patting its own political and social views on the back. If the movies I had just listed were actually really well made movies, and not average or below average, that would be a different story.

To say the list of best movie nominees says something about a camera is dubious at best, and fools gold/a waste of valuable time to pay attention to at worst. Many movies on the best movie list did not make good money. Some were never even heard of before the best picture list was announced.

Three of the nominees are not even in the top 100 grossers of 2013. Only one, Gravity, is in the top 10 grossers. So ok, the camera used for the nominees were not in all big money making movies. Saying ARRI was the primary camera used in these movies means something? Not seeing other camera names in the list, even though the movies those other cameras were used in may have made a f#@% of a lot money more, means something about those cameras?

Just sayin.

January 20, 2014 at 7:14PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gene

When did District 9 start getting considered 'below average'?

January 20, 2014 at 7:42PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Thom

You didn't read all I said. Why?

January 20, 2014 at 8:06PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gene

I've read what you said and would have to pull you up on District 9 and There Will Be Blood. Stone cold classics both of them.

January 21, 2014 at 3:13AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Will Gilbey

That's a matter of opinion. Others may see politics laid think in both of those movies. But some like the politics of those movies and think they are very good movies because of it. Some loathe politics.

January 21, 2014 at 4:20AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gene

typo, laid thick

January 21, 2014 at 4:23AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gene

Wow, you really have to be one super paranoid ultra-conservative to dismiss There Will Be Blood as liberal propaganda. And you'd have to be absolutely clueless about filmmaking to claim that it is not a well made movie (whatever your feelings about the story).

January 20, 2014 at 8:37PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Davíð

It was fairly well made. But it was dreary and created the impulse to get up and leave the theater to get some fresh air and and do something more worth the time.

And when did I call it liberal propaganda? It appears my comment was a Rorschach that brought out something about you. Yes, there was clear left wing politics in it. Anyone could see that, couldn't they? The movie started out SOOOO interesting. But it spiraled downward until all it became was hatred of big oil barons, and demeaning of Christianity. Was it on the level of a Leni Riefenstahl-esque propaganda movie? Of course not. It wasn't in our faces that much.

Probably the most juicy left wing political statement was when the Daniel Day Lewis character turns on his foster son, the boy he had given so much for and cared for him so dearly after his father died and for him so tenderly after his severe ear trauma, and views him as an enemy.. At that point Hollywood must have said it will give that movie an award if it kills them.

January 20, 2014 at 10:55PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gene

A good example of a movie that was making political statements but was such a great movie to watch that I could ignore the politics was The Bourne Identity. Maybe the best action spy movie ever. It had political statement woven throughout it. But did anyone care? I bet even people from the far right of politics enjoyed that movie. There is no way one could get away from the politics of There Will Be Blood. Kinda sucks too because one of the best acting performances I ever saw was by Daniel Day Lewis in My Left Foot! I will continue to love and respect what he did in that movie regardless of his strong personal politics.

January 20, 2014 at 11:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gene

The Bourne identity??? Dude grab a comic book on your way out. Better animations in there than Disney

January 21, 2014 at 9:44AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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thadon calico

The trend of shooting the Arri cameras in my opinion is simply because the budget allows it, and it is still the "standard", as in its tried and tested. I also believe the fact that it was manufactured with the intention of emulating or surpassing film stock is a huge part of that. It does not make it a "better" camera than the others, just the go to one. After a certain point, the importance of the camera's specs dwarf in comparison to the importance of composition, lighting, lens, filtering, color grade, story (yes storytelling is an aspect of cinematography), etc.

January 21, 2014 at 12:14AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Steven

You might have clicked on the wrong "Reply"

January 21, 2014 at 12:52AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gene

District 9, Michael Clayton, There Will Be Blood are considered way above average films by the general critical community for starters - so what you're talking about is just your opinion, and you know what they say about opinions.

January 21, 2014 at 9:04PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Stu Mannion

Critics? And?

I bet most of the general population has not even heard of Michael Clayton. And very few have heard of There Will be Blood. Who cares about the critics. Critics opinions don't put food on the table. I remember when Crying Game was in '100 Critics Top 10 List'. I thought it had to be good. So I went. Gah Dang it was boring. The only thing good about it was Forrest Witaker's acting. But once he was gone form the movie it was a dud.

January 26, 2014 at 5:05PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gene

The alexa shoots straight to cards with 2k 444 prores up to 120fps (no RAW, no proxies, nothing complicated), is rock solid, and has a very filmic texture/image because of its built in halation filter. In addition, its Arri and theyve been doing cameras for like 90 years; literally the most trusted camera brand. So producers are more comfortable with it and basically it represents the status quo.

RED has only been in the game for a few years and while the epic and scarlet are awesome cameras, the RAW workflow has extra steps and while it gives you great results, its usually reserved for more vfx heavy shoots, or shorter pieces like commercials and music vids OR OR OR indies and students that want to upgrade from their shitty DSLR or blackmagic (which is mostly used as a personal camera) and want to rent something nice.

I like both platforms to be honest.. i just finished a 30 min short in dec. with a scarlet and zeiss superspeeds and it looks amazing and nobody has ever complained about "image" so its a fine camera. Honestly RED has the advantage with their modular system and interchangeable lens mounts but their internet cult-following (ketch rossi, etc) is kindof a liability for them and when i speak with rental houses they always say "yeah we dont read reduser because of all the fanboys"

January 20, 2014 at 8:34PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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john jeffries

Recode is compressed. Not ideal for visual effects,
ArriRAW is uncompressed. Like a film scan minus the grain.

January 20, 2014 at 8:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Peter

redcode is visually lossless at low compression, so it doesn't matter that its not uncompressed, plus it shoots more resolution so after debayer your left with more then an Alexa

January 20, 2014 at 9:37PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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brian merlen

It may be visually lossless compression, but when you are sitting there in Flame or Nuke and are trying to key the peach fuzz off the side of the face of an actor against green screen it is very noticeable. Image based keyers like IBK in Nuke also see the compression and it manifests itself is poor edge quality for keys. You can also feel it during some color correction operations, especially green-spill suppression or if you are doing a selective color correction in a narrow hue band.

I know this because I have worked on several features that were shot on RED and for that facility on the little island on the far end of the planet, who's owner shoots RED.

Yes, eventually you make it work, but it does not make your life any easier and there is an added cost in overtime to the the production.

January 21, 2014 at 12:27PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Peter

wavelet compression (redcode) is, like brian said, visually lossless at like 3:1 ratio etc so yeah

have fun with all that uncompressed data

January 20, 2014 at 9:39PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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john jeffries

Anyone notice that half of the cinematography nominees shot film stock too?

January 21, 2014 at 12:25AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Steven

film is still considered the "gold standard" for most of the older pro DP's i.e the ones most likely to be working on oscar worthy productions. And when you have a shitload of money to work with, why not shoot with film?

January 21, 2014 at 3:35PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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john jeffries

Colour, Colour, Colour.

January 20, 2014 at 9:05PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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JPS

Yellow tint, yellow tint, yellow tint

January 21, 2014 at 10:58PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Natt

Honestly, I've edited and color graded Alexa footage and never saw it that great. I mean it was better in color and dynamic range than the Red Epic, but the F65 was better than both. Messing with Red Dragon footage, I could say that the camera destroys the Alexa, especially with the Motion Mount. But less than a year will be another story. Producers and cinematographers just want to use ARRI, cause it's ARRI. Not sure why we're still stuck on 35mm sensors, when companies should go 70mm like the Phantom 65. I know it's cause of lenses, but c'mon almost every lens company is pushing their new digital primes and they're still restricting it to 35mm sensors. Time to start making IMAX digital cameras.4444

January 21, 2014 at 12:26AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Nick

^Not necessarily what many cinematographers want to hear though, is it?

January 21, 2014 at 2:41PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Eric

a medium format cinema camera would be so amazing. vintage MF lenses are super cheap right now too

January 21, 2014 at 3:36PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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john jeffries

January 21, 2014 at 5:11PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Juhan-i

As someone who works in post and has had Alexa, RED, Sony, Canon and Panavision footage come in the door, all I can say is I can make anything look like anything else if necessary. I came onto the scene only ever having worked in the digital realm, yet some of my work has fooled execs and even projectionists into believing they were seeing Kodak, Agfa or various other types of film stocks, even when it was stuff shot on DSLRs. Right now I'm more excited about RED Dragon's 4k HDR and dynamic range capabilities than Alexa's workflow from a post perspective (and I have a RED Rocket to manage RED footage so arguments about RED Raw versus ProRes are moot), and yes, it's more about the brain driving the camera than the camera itself - I've seen crap from any and all systems and I've seen utter gold from all. Besides, to me it's less about the box and more about the glass - the ultimate measure of any camera.

January 21, 2014 at 2:58AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Old Red Rocket card does not work with Dragon 6K footage. So, if you like to work with new Dragon material, you need a new card.

January 21, 2014 at 2:53PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Juhan-i

In addition, with the way GPU acceleration in redcine is coming along, you honestly wont need a rocket card anymore

January 21, 2014 at 3:38PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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john jeffries

Running a 2010 MacPro with the RED Rocket. Yet to work with Dragon 6k but when I do I suspect it will be with the new MacPro anyway. I've got a DoP wanting to shoot me some 4k Black Magic footage in the next few months and there's been some whisperings of some 4k C500 stuff coming this way too. Either way I'm not too worried about dealing with 4k or 6k footage. A feature I'm working on at the moment is being mastered at 4k and I even worked on a short shot on RED One at 4k without the RED Rocket with no dramas. Ultimately, I'm happy to work with whatever the DoP prefers, and deliver in post the "look" they want, whether it's that "video" feel of the Sony systems, the "filmic" look or the "crisp digital cinema" look. It's all possible when you know what you're doing in post.

January 21, 2014 at 6:31PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Dave S

Thanks for commenting. I always look for comments from people who actually work with the cameras, and/or, editing what comes from the cameras, talked about. I'll be looking for your name in the future.

January 21, 2014 at 8:19PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gene

A couple of reasonably sized projects of my own this year, and a rather big one next year. It might take a little while, but I'll be around :-)
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm2971019/

:-)

January 22, 2014 at 4:13AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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This one is great David S: http://vimeo.com/77756703

January 26, 2014 at 5:14PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gene

This list is useless, for the serious filmmaker this only works for curiosity. With a good director, DOP, gaffers and colorisst, you can get outstanding images from pretty much any camera.

January 21, 2014 at 3:07AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Marcus

Having used the RED Epic (and hated it) and the ARRI Alexa (she's mah baybe!), I've gotta say that what you can do *in camera* with the Alexa far outstrips what you can do with the Epic.

...leaving out those pesky overheating issues that RED has, as well.

Alexa - she's wonderful to use. She's feels like a CAMERA as opposed to the portable hard-drive that the RED feels like. And the control you have with the Alexa is glorious. ARRI essentially went 'how can we make a digital camera that has the same capabilities as celluloid' and it shows. The Epic feels like a camcorder with a higher pixel rate.

What I really want to see, now, is for ARRI to move past the 'let's make digital like celluloid' and onto 'let's see how far we can take digital'. Because I bet you anything that it will be exciting to see where it goes.

January 21, 2014 at 5:32AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Seanne

its funny because ‘let’s see how far we can take digital’ is RED's design philosophy

January 21, 2014 at 3:39PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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john jeffries

"She.." Fanboy alert.

January 21, 2014 at 11:02PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Natt

The big difference is that arri is a german company and red an us company.
Arri wants to produce a camera that is stable, has good ergonomics, is easy to use, solid and will still be used in 5 years. They don't bring up a new camera every year, but when a new arri camera reaches the masses u can be sure that it works.
Red is the typical us-company, they don't care that much about solid and stable, but they are always up to date and give u the newest technology as fast as possible. Thing is that sometimes the first buyers have to do the beta testing. Therefore the company got the reputation they now have to live with.

January 21, 2014 at 7:12AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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geraldo

You have good analysis, but there is one little flaw. Red really are not cutting edge company. This is simply because they do not have resources or real research where it counts. They are literally the Apple of cameras.

Modern digital camera rises and falls with the sensor tech. And Red simply do not have any real innovation in that area. They rely entirely outside companies, just like Apple does with their wares.

Sony F65, 6K + 14 stops DR - over 2 years old.

Sony F55, 4K, 14 stops DR with real global shutter - over year old, and so on.

January 21, 2014 at 3:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Juhan-i

sorry but what are you saying?
Red Dragon have right now?
6k in recording, motion mount global shutter, HDRx, silent fans ..
And you do not call this news?
You're probably not a technician. I hate to see people like you who speak against for no reason.

January 21, 2014 at 3:44PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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ANDRIUS

guys I would not be so happy ...
I love Alexa and I think the best room at the moment, but I've also seen pictures of Red DRagon and are damn crazy, useless to deny it, definitely the best Alexa.
I want to see what happens this year.

January 21, 2014 at 8:29AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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mafioli

It looks to me like the big Hollywood studios have chosen the Arri Alexa because they're trying to set an expensive standard that would continue to keep new filmmakers out of the film industry.

It costs a small fortune to rent the Arri Alexa, so it's not as accessible to independent filmmakers as other cameras.

January 21, 2014 at 2:58PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Glenn

ALEXA has the best colour, widest dynamic range, image doesn't look like video, it's easy to use, it's built like a tank, has a simple workflow, loads any LUTs, does 120fps, works under any sort of temperatures and humidities, doesn't have fan-noise issues, has worldwide support and comes from a very reliable and serious german company.

Oh, and it only costs €500/day €1,500/week to rent.

Why would anyone want to use anything else? (and put his reputation in jeopardy if something went wrong)

In the EU everybody went from ARRIFLEX (film) straight to ALEXA, with a very very brief try with REDs and others, which were soon discarded due to their many many issues. This for TV commercials, TV drama and Movies (regardless of budget)

January 21, 2014 at 3:28PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Henry

It is a part you are right , Alexa has a great workflow, but only for ProRes .
Herry I guess you 've never worked with ARRI Raw flow otherwise you would change your mind, and heavy equal to the RED files .
However, the Red Dragon is now has a dynamic range equal and perhaps beyond Alexa , has less noise at high ISO, consumes less , weighs little , especially the carbon version , files can be recorded with a compression rate of more high without loss of quality . I can put on a drone , on a gimbal can record at 300 fps with more quality of Epic, a lot of new fans silent , has the motion mount with electronic ND filter adjustable up to 1/ 3 stop increments , may be global shutter and is much more stable than Epic.
If I had to choose a camera now I would choose the Dragon and certainly not an Alexa.
Once the fight was between fuji and kodak there were the years that dominated Kodak and Fuji that dominated the years , so I would not do too much attention to the Oscars.

January 21, 2014 at 3:57PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Luigi

I just assumed Alexa was a ProRes only camera, but checking the website, it appears every single one does DNxHD too.
http://www.arri.com/camera/digital_cameras/cameras/alexa_model_comparison/

January 21, 2014 at 4:24PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Saied

Shoot a commercial, starring Rafael Nadal or Heidi Klum, on the beach in Mallorca in the very hot summer. You've got the talent for 4-5 hours after which they leave to catch a flight to the other side of the world.

Shoot with a RED. It suddenly overheats, or crashes, or the colour goes wrong, or it misses a few frames, or it just stops working or who knows what. Phone whom? Ask in a forum from the beach?
The Production Manager panics. The Producer tries to calm the client in everyway possible. Everybody gets highly stressed. The camera is dead. Maybe the fan sucked sand into the electronics, or because it was too hot at 42º Celsius. The day is lost. The Commercial must be rescheduled next week and reshoot. An amount of €200k have been wasted. The DP or Director or whomever chose to shoot on RED is fired and his career is finished. For good.

Life is cruel.

January 21, 2014 at 6:44PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Henry

is true the old Red One had this problem, Epic does not have these problems, especially with the new fans. Dragon is usually as a rock. Alexa also famous film on sets in Dubai had gone out from the heat under the sun, however, she had her troubles, only the Sup 7 was stable, not before. Maybe you'd better tell before writing.
Why not write for BBC productions in the Planet Earth have used the Epic in 3d, flying over the volcano and all the time in the heat of the savannah, etc. etc. and have never switched off or had problems and brought home the true 4k .
but the question to be, you've never used an Epic or Alexa?
or write what you feel?

January 22, 2014 at 4:49AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Luigi

Here, in the U.S., I'm seeing rates of $1500 - $2000 per day for Arri Alexa camera rentals. So, how is that an affordable, viable option for independent filmmakers?

January 21, 2014 at 5:03PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Glenn

Sounds like you need to find yourself a more ruthless producer, who can cut a better deal.

January 21, 2014 at 6:48PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Ron

The rentals is another story. Alexa pays for itself quickly. Red will often sit around idly with a lot of owner-operators. And major productions, by the way, will rent half a dozen of these cams easily. For an independent though, a good 4K rental is Canon C500 with a Gemini or a Codex recorder using either Raw or ProRes. Scanning the web, the C500 + a set of Canon Cinema Primes + Gemini might run about $2K for a weekend and a little more for a full week.

January 21, 2014 at 10:04PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DLD

lol fuck that brainbox in culver city does it for 700 / weekend

January 22, 2014 at 3:39AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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john jeffries

Actually, Sony F65/F55 currently have the widest color gamut.

January 21, 2014 at 8:24PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Mikey

right..plus the arri lt is great

January 26, 2014 at 5:18PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DIO

Who cares. Use what you like and what's best for the project.

January 21, 2014 at 6:20PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Mikey

I think it just comes down to the look. The desired "filmic look", the colors, the texture, the dynamic range. We all know how film looks as it's been the standard for so many years and with new stocks like the Kodak 5219 we get an even sharper image, slighter better saturation and a tad more highlight rolloff. The look is hard to match, the resolution is there but it's not over sharp showing every pore in someones skin or picking up details we don't need to see that don't look natural.

The Alexa just looks the closest to film, it's built more like a film camera, as it's more balanced, rugged, and heavy which contributes to the look as well. The global shutter is a big deal too and until recently, RED didn't have an answer for rolling shutter. The Alexa also shoots 2.8K raw internal now which is enough as it achieves a nice balance of sharpness and a "film" desired look but still adds that functionality to make it look how you want it to.

Every interview i've read on the Arri website or some magazine or behind the scenes episode, the DP always mentions how they have been shooting film and how they are familiar with Arri and how the Alexa is so comparable in terms of latitude, grain, the way it handles highlights, and the colors and skin tones. They are mostly older guys from the film generation so of course they are gonna go with Arri. Why pick something that doesn't do what you need it to or something that makes it harder to achieve a desired look. Most of these guys don't care about the resolution and sharpness RED sensors bring as they don't look as filmic.

RED is a newer company and by this time they have the Dragon which can truly compete with the Alexa and hopefully these type of guys will give the camera a chance. But then again maybe they won't as there is no reason to change as the look they want is there already in a package they're familiar with from a company they're familiar with. It's not taking anything away from RED as there are still plenty of movies shot on RED and i've noticed younger filmmakers like the look and feel of RED and that will be our generations "Arri" in given time. They also use Arri because it's so unobtainable to anybody but higher budget productions, especially when you shoot raw. They want to seem like true professionals and not "prosumer" in any way and I feel RED has some features that can put them into that category but it's an option. Such as Canon mounts and side handles.

It all comes down to preference and like i stated, these are old school filmmakers and DP's who want the look and feel of film and a film camera and that's the option right now and may continue to be. I know the Dragon will impress a lot and hopefully be used on more drama's and genres in general. I still think big budgets will continue to use film and why not? But I've seen some stuff shot on RED that truly was impressive and looked very filmic to me. Check out the movie "Disconnect" which was released in 2013 as well as several episodes of the TV show "Banshee", or MARVEL's Agent's Of Shield which showcases how good skin tones can look and how highlights can look when used in conjunction with the correct filters and lighting.

January 21, 2014 at 7:20PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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So, basically what you are saying that the main reason why the Alexa is so popular is because it's a security blanket for a bunch of geriatric luddites, who have a strangle hold on cinematography and lack the vision of their smarter, younger counterparts, because they are hopelessly trapped in the past; rehashing the last +100 years of cinema over and over and over again... Hopefully sooner, rather than later, these dinosaurs will shuffle off to the big studio in the sky and a new red dawn will break, ushering in an era of enlightenment and relegating all that came before to the dustbin of history and ignominious irrelevance.

Ahh, the sweet ignorance of youth.

January 24, 2014 at 3:13AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Sal

I'm sorry but why is it resolution so important to you and RED? ARRI has clearly stated that resolution isn't their focus but the look of the image they produce. 6K is an insanely expensive and stupid resolution, why have a higher resolution when your image and the colors don't look natural. I mean RED barely can read the RED color, it turns out to be white every time you point the camera to a flashing red light.

These cinematographers aren't stuck in the past, they know what they're doing, they've studied, they've tested several cameras and still chose the Alexa. In Captain Philips they even used the C500 and the Go Pro Hero, that's amazing! I think your missing the point here and trying to defend the brand RED not the aesthetics of the image and the language of each film.

As Roger Deakins say, a camera is just a tool, don't let the features of each one overcome your objective in cinematography.

January 25, 2014 at 9:11AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Alex Vecchi

Great words Brad,
Dragon closes this gap, but usually if you're perfectly happy with that now you continue to use the camera even after.
We'll see in 2014 and 2015. Certain that the Red Carbon Dragon with motion mount is really tempting .. I'll wait 'NAB.

January 22, 2014 at 4:38AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Luigi

Why best picture category? why no best cinematography? That would be more appropriate.
With Dragon it might change in a year or two. It might not.
Alexa is a big camera and requires a lot of heavy duty gear. Red needs much less, Girl with the Dragon Tattoo was shot on RED.
You can pull up a list of best tv shows and compare their cameras. You can read the list of top grossing films and discuss their cameras. But when you are choosing a camera to shoot your film you have so many variables - it comes down to the project. As far as best picture Oscar material - it's more about writing and directing and acting, than technical details.

January 22, 2014 at 2:57PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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lanalana

What some people fail to grasp here, it's the budgets we are talking about. Transitioning to digital media instead of shooting film and scanning has been a hard desition, and the crossover will continue for a few years. Do you really think a producer would gamble a multi-million dolar production on an unreliable, unproven camera such as red for the task? Arri is not only the gold standard on film products reliability, but also operator friendly, and fully compatible with the top-notch gear qualified technicians are used to work with. That alone would close the deal, but alexa is by far the most comfortable, simple and operator-friendly camera I have ever s
That being said, I look with great interest the results obtained with cheap cameras such as c500, since they open the door for OTHER ways of storytelling, and so does Red. But comparing them with an alexa is not only laughable, is straight-up missing the point that made them revolutionary.

January 22, 2014 at 6:57PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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player_L

Gold Standards, Gold Schmandards.

Its like editors, not wanting to move away from AVID. Hiring people to convert their footage to MXF, still regarding Premiere Pro CC as consumer software. Because grandpa say's so. Avid is good stuff. Just never look down on your little brother.

Dutch advertising agency Habbekrats shot a road movie with a 5d Mark II because they couldn't get the right funds. The movie was played in all big theaters (pathe also) and won big national awards and gave them the opportunity to fund their next movie.

When in the hobbit, you see the go pro like underwater footage, thats a huge noticable difference. But I dare you to watch the wolf of wallstreet and pick out which scene was shot on the c500.

Good luck.

January 23, 2014 at 6:56AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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People who think that Avid can be replaced by Premiere, just don't understand Avid and why it is pretty much the only option for big productions where there are more than 20 editors working in the same show. The same goes with the Alexa and Red. For a small production it might be ok to loose a few shots due to the Red overheating or corrupting files , but when you have a 2 million special effects shot with complicated stunts you just can't take the risk. But yeah, this days it is really hard to tell the difference between camera bodies, if the picture is well shot and is processed by a good colorist with the right equipment, it is really hard to tell the difference.

January 23, 2014 at 9:13AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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jpirizarry

i think this means tv is the actual world for the tech revolution.why not it is the bigger market

January 23, 2014 at 4:24PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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emilio murillo

Congratulations to Arri, that's a real score. Of course it's the most widely established camera and very well supported. This industry moves fast though, and the usurpers are on the rise with a new generation. What proportion of all the professsionally produced, cinematic level content, in 2014 is this? Probably less than 1%.
In terms of viewers that proportion is undoubtedly higher, but they don't care about cameras only content.

January 24, 2014 at 3:09AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Chris K Jones

The other thing to take into account is the dates that these films were shot.

Principal Photography in Gravity commenced in May 2011.

You'll probably see a whole heap of nominations going to cameras shot on F55 & F65, as well as Dragons, but not till 2015/16.

My last longform project was shot on Epic, our next is shooting on Sony's.

The Alexa is a gorgeous camera, but I can't justify paying triple the expense when you include a RAW recorder too.

January 25, 2014 at 4:37AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Simon

Then again, a studio might believe the extra money spent for an Alexa plus equipment might eventually save money because of aforementioned examples: If reshooting is not an option, you go for the camera that has the highest reliability and least expectable data loss. If on-set sound is important and you want to give the sound guy a chance to practice during rehearsal, the camera that does not vent air audibly while not recording (and sometimes even during recording to prevent overheating), might be the tool to go for, as well. Regarding how little the price for renting the camera influences the overall budget of expensive TV shows, commercials or features for the international market, the Alexa might be the smartest decision by far.

January 25, 2014 at 6:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Anteeru

Greetings Friends !

Is it possible for No Film School to organize some in-campus short to long term courses/programs on Cinematography ?

Regards,
Ronjeev

January 26, 2014 at 9:41AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Ronjeev Das

Hello people,

don't forget - when you're in Hollywood, or on any other film set, you cannot be seen to have an 'inferior' equipment. Imagine a DOP ordering 5D Mk3 kit, saving the production thousands in the process? From then on he/she would not be able to go back to Arri with 3-4 assistants.

That's how it works, stand your ground, keep your position and look important. You make more money and get more respect. It has nothing to do with the 'look' of Arri, or any other camera. That 'look' is also dependent on the colourist, on locations, set dressing, costumes, etc, as we all know.

January 29, 2014 at 9:00AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Nik

I'm not an industry insider, just a first time indie producer / director so I don't have a ton of insight on this story (which I've seen flogged all over the place). But my other job is involved in deep engineering and I deal with analysis and statistics every day. The thing I do know is that the Oscars are very political awards and it takes quite a bit of cash just to fund the promotional work to get to a place of nomination. Even then, so many people are passed over who should have been at least nominated if not won outright. Using this set of conditions as a basis for meaningful analysis is silly. You might have as well said, if money were absolutely no object and you could have the best image with the least risk, what would you chose? Or if brevity was your thing you could just say, "Major Studios Prefer Arri!" and be done with it.

Perhaps the best question would have been something like, what's camera has a great looking image, doesn't cost a king's ransom and has great workflow? As far as I know that changes with the year and the seasons -- which makes it a little difficult to get enough time to really develop your art.

For myself I've arrived at another point of view. The picture comes from raw talent, hard work, a thorough understanding of composition, lighting, cinematic language (ala Mastershots), great writing and a good understanding of how to allow your actors to enter their comfort zones to get their best performance.

Citizen Kane, Blade Runner, The Godfather or The Matrix could have been shot on an iPhone or GH2 and they would still be incredibly important films.

In the engineering world, though we love our toys, we have a saying, "A fool with a tool is still a fool..."

February 14, 2014 at 4:13PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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eris

"So ok, the camera used for the nominees were not in all big money making movies"
3 of the top 10 grossing movies of 2013 were animated. Of the remaining 7 movies, 5 used Arri as primary cameras and 2 used Red.

March 17, 2014 at 3:32PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Merle

Lack the vision?

You mean because they don't want movies to look like a local newscast?

When these new young visionaries create masterpieces like "The Godfather" and "Chinatown" you can gripe about the old guys lol

April 15, 2014 at 7:56AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Tom Hartman

GoPro cameras have utterly revolutionized the photography & video world. I’ve been exploitation one to record my journey travel experiences for the past 3 years – it’s gone skin-dive with American state, surfing, on public transportation, trekking up mountains, volcano boarding, skydiving, boating, ice climbing, snorkeling, hitchhiking and a lot of. 2 of my pictures have even been featured on GoPro’s web site as their “Photo of the Day”. - See more athttp:quadcopter4u.com

May 5, 2014 at 2:56PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Well, that, and the fact that people don't really like using a camera that sends them to hospital with burns on their hands thus costing them their job on set and also melting cameras are an issue with the RED Epic.

And you don't have as much control over the footage in terms of things like shutter angle and speed with the RED. And the RED is absolute BALLS in low light, which is one of the main issues - you have to overlight everything and then add shadows in post.

The ARRI, on the other hand, has less pixels and weighs more but I'll take that over nerve damaging burns and an inability to shoot in any less light than mid-day on a cloudless summer afternoon any day of the week.

On a psychosomatic level, the Alexa actually feels like a camera. You have a lot more respect for her than for the RED, which just feels like a standard DSLR to handle. Sure, you add lenses and gear but the camera itself doesn't really command any respect.

June 6, 2014 at 8:20PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Seanne

David Fincher and many others use Adobe Premiere.

June 7, 2014 at 2:32AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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RidingtheDragon

It would be interesting to see what cam. the short fiction films where shot on. They usually have very limited budgets.
It would be cool to see if some of the shorts in 2 years are actually shot on Digital Bolex or BMC pocket.

June 7, 2014 at 7:29AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I very much doubt that this will get the attention you so clearly would like.

June 7, 2014 at 12:05PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Asking questions are in fact nice thing if you are not understanding
anything completely, but this post provides
nice understanding even.

June 12, 2014 at 7:11PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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