May 14, 2014

Canon Introduces Two New Lenses: EF 16-35MM F/4L & EF-S 10-18MM F/4.5-5.6

Canon was mostly quiet at NAB 2014 (at least on the lower end), but they have just announced two new lenses for those who are more budget-conscious, the full-frame EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM and the APS-C EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM. While both lenses are slower than some other Canon options in this range, they both have image stabilization, and the APS-C lens is designed with the quieter STM motors that should work better with autofocus during video.

Here is more on the 16-35mm f/4L lens:

In addition, an intelligent CPU in the lens automatically selects the optimal IS mode by recognizing differences between normal handheld shots and panning. This technological advancement supports a greater range of creative expression for photographers in otherwise difficult shooting situations, such as dark indoor scenes where flash photography is prohibited, or in places where a tripod cannot be used, or when shooting at low ISO speeds.

Performance of the 16-35mm f/4:

MTF-16-35-IS

  • Price: $1,200
  • Availability: June 2014

And more on the 10-18mm:

Compared to the EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM wide-angle lens, the EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM ultra wide-angle zoom lens is nearly 20% smaller and 38% lighter. When combined with a compact digital SLR, such as the Canon EOS Rebel SL1 camera, the smaller size makes it very convenient to carry with the camera when traveling. The compact four-group zoom optical system provides a maximum magnification of 0.15x at the telephoto end. The wide-angle zoom range of the new EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM is a perfect complement to the currently available EF-S 18-55mm IS and EF-S 55-250mm IS STM zoom lenses.

  • Price: $300
  • Availability: June 2014

The 10-18 is about half the price of the Canon 10-22 lens, though it is a little slower. The 16-35mm price difference isn't quite as much, as the faster 16-35mm f/2.8 is $500 more at $1,700, and available for only $1,500 with a $200 mail-in rebate. You can find links to both lenses below.

Links:

[via Canon Rumors]

Your Comment

15 Comments

FWIW, Samyang/Rokinon also came out with a bunch of new lenses recently. Unlike these Canons, they are de-clicked and much faster. (though, historically, Rokinon products weren't that sharp fully open)

May 14, 2014 at 10:52PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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DLD

I'm seriously considering buying some Rokinon lenses just for the fact that they are De-clicked.
In your experience, are they worth it?
My first choice was the 14mm T3.1 because the widest lens I have is 24-105 mm, and when I record video, the sensor is cropped and the "wide" aspect of the image is reduced, so to counter that, I should use the 14mm, or even wider.
I know they are super smooth wide open, and sharp at T8 or around that number, but my interest is focused mostly on video.

May 15, 2014 at 10:15AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I use the 35mm 1.5 Rokinon at work. I would say they are totally worth the money that you pay for it, but that isn't to say that they are good lenses. In my opinion, they are unuseable wide-open or totally closed. Too much CA and softness. They are cheap lenses and that is the kind of performance you should expect. I typically use my Canon 24mm 1.4 II in stead of the Rokinon, but you could buy 3 Rokinon for the price of the Canon. My point is, you get what you pay for.

May 15, 2014 at 10:45AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Rick

Rick is right. They're good enough, so long as you're not wide open or fully stopped down. T2 is usable, but T2.8-8 is about the range I use with our Rokinon 24mm.

May 15, 2014 at 2:24PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Victor, what Rick wrote is the prevailing opinion but I believe I linked to the new line of the Samyang products, which likely performs somewhat differently than their old line. You'd just have to scour through the various sites and reviews to get a full picture. (pun unintentional)

Your other option is to combine a higher quality still lens like Sigma - around $1K but a top performer at that or any price - with a Metabones Speed Booster that has a clickless aperture adjustment built in. MB's run ~ $400K-$600 for the most popular types. With shooters with smaller sensor cameras like GH4 or BMPC4K, the MB boosters are very popular. (then there custom made cine lenses but their prices run somewhere in between the top photo and the low end cine lines ... i.e., they ain't cheap)

May 15, 2014 at 1:42PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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DLD

As an APSC user (C100) the 16-35 F/4 doesn't seem as good a value as my trusty 17-55 at 2.8. The 10-18 at 3.5-4.5, well, maybe...at $300, the expectations are low enough that it might be a good wide to have in the bag. But generally kind of uninspired, Canon, no?

May 14, 2014 at 10:52PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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It seems like they're working the entry level DSLR market here. What lenses do you think they need on the high end? They got a fairly extensive lineup for both video and photos pros.
.
BTW, these are the Samyangs I was talking about earlier -
https://www.facebook.com/samyangeurope

May 14, 2014 at 10:57PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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DLD

I've never understood the F4 versions of other l-series lenses. Doesn't it make sense that if you're willing to bank a grand or more on a lens that you'd just go the whole way and get a decent f-stop with it.

May 14, 2014 at 11:01PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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the f/4 versions have IS. f/2.8s so far do not - in the 16-35 and 24-70 models anyway

May 15, 2014 at 12:57AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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dv

+1. The benefits of built in IS is huge, but I use zooms in too many situations when available light can't be counted on. I choose speed over stabilization, especially when I'm paying $1000 or more per lens.

May 15, 2014 at 12:35PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Marc B

It's designed for stills shooters that do most of their work in broad daylight and never go beyond the f5.6-8 "Sweet spot" of the lens. They can use shutter speed to compensate. Can't do that for video.

May 15, 2014 at 4:08PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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john jeffries

At the beginning it was just darkness. Then God said, "Canon, where is the light?"

May 15, 2014 at 7:43AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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edgar

This right here.

May 15, 2014 at 9:35AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Thom

very good

May 15, 2014 at 2:41PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Pictures of the new 10-18mm lens appear to show the same plastic mount that Canon uses on there "kit" lenses. Having used there 55-250mm Canon kit lens quite extensively it did not take much of a bump in the wrong direction to crack and missalign the mount resulting in a $150 repair bill.

The shorter barrel may minimize this failure mode but I sure wish they had not taken this cost saving short cut.

May 17, 2014 at 2:05PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Harry