August 14, 2014

8 Minutes is All Robert Rodriguez Needs to Tell You How to Make Your First Film

We all know Robert Rodriguez. Not only did he make his first feature for less than $8,000 and share every step of that process in his book Rebel Without A Crew, but he's gone on to shoot countless other features and even found his own television network. For anybody wanting to make their first film, but is not sure where to start and what steps to take, a video of one of Rodriguez's famous 10-minute film schools has been making its way around the web, and it has the answers that you're looking for in a way that only Rodriguez can provide. So if you've got a few minutes, here's Robert Rodriguez, the man himself, to tell you exactly how to make your first film.

Just as a heads up, this video first aired in 1993 (before some of you were even born), so not only has filmmaking technology progressed ever-so-slightly since this lesson occurred, but the visual quality of the video itself is pretty awful. Luckily, the content is outstanding. Have a look:

There's so much that we can learn from Rodriguez here. First and foremost is attitude. One of things that Rodriguez hammers home is that if you want to make a film, there's not much standing in your way other than yourself. Stop wanting to be a filmmaker and start calling yourself one. Then go out and make your film. There will always be obstacles, but there will also be unlimited creative ways to navigate those obstacles while still getting your film made.

Then there's the Rodriguez method for previsualizing your first film. You can storyboard if you want, but he recommends that you sit down without any distractions and try to watch your movie from start to finish, shot for shot, cut for cut (all of this is in your head, of course). He says to watch it, then write down what you see. Visualize the shots that you need, then just go get those shots. If you can see how your movie should look and feel before you ever roll a camera, you'll have a much better chance of getting the footage and story that you want.

Beyond those fun and practical ideas, this video is also a veritable goldmine of inspirational Rodriguez quotes. Here are a few of my personal favorites.

  • "Tell everyone that your mistakes are art. You can get away with a lot that way."
  • "If you're just creative, you'll always have to rely on technical people. If you're creative and technical, you're unstoppable."
  • "Take stock in what you already have. If your father owns a liquor store, make a movie about a liquor store. You've got a dog? Make a movie about your dog."

Perhaps the most inspirational thing about all of this is that Rodriguez did it all before filmmaking technology was "democratized." There were no inexpensive DSLRs or free NLEs, and the internet was nowhere near being able to provide a platform like YouTube or Vimeo for everybody to showcase their work. Many of the obstacles that Rodriguez explains how to avoid in this video don't even exist in 2014. With that in mind, the overarching message of this video is even more relevant and easy to achieve today that it was 20 years ago: if you want to make a movie, the only thing standing in your way is yourself.

[via FilmmakerIQ]

Your Comment

68 Comments

Would like to make a correction in the advice given. First, go out and make a film, and then, call yourself a film maker. This industry has enough hack, posers as it is...we don't need to have everyone reading this start going around town telling everyone that they're a filmmaker when they haven't made squat. My other favorite is all the people who list themselves as the "CEO" of their made up "production company" on LinkedIn...we all know your "production company" consists of your sony camcorder and laptop. Nothing wrong with starting a company for work...but please, don't think you're fooling anyone by labeling yourself the Chief Executive Officer or President of your basement office.

August 14, 2014 at 4:53PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Busta

I don't think everyone should go around calling themselves a filmmaker. That may have been a good idea when Rodriguez first said it but yeah, the times have changed. But calling yourself the CEO of your own company, if you do in fact own and operate an LLC, seems fair enough to me. You are literally the Chief Executive Officer of that company. You don't want to use that title on every email you send out but for certain emails it is necessary. And if you are your own boss and making money at what you do, then nobody can tell you what to call yourself.

August 14, 2014 at 5:57PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

1
Reply
Mark

100% YES!

August 14, 2014 at 6:00PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

19
Reply
Matt

In the context of this seminar it's nothing more than a self-motivational device. If you want to be something you need to tell yourself that you are and then focus on being the best filmmaker or _____________ that you can be. In other words it's less about telling everyone else that you are a filmmaker and more about telling yourself that your a filmmaker. Over-confidence can be a problem, but self-doubt is a real creativity killer. One that can stop you before you ever start.

August 14, 2014 at 6:15PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

2
Reply
Angus

@angus Exactly. With more experience, some people might find much of his advice isn't so practical, but for people looking to get their feet wet, he's a fantastic motivator.

August 14, 2014 at 7:14PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

3
Reply
Doug

Exactly! There's far too much negativity out there...particularly on the web. If you want to get something done you need to believe in yourself and stay positive. I love Robert's positivity. I think those that overestimate their talents will be rewarded with a lesser outcome so my main focus has always been to learn as much as I can about the process and remain positive. Oh, and most importantly, just keep on pluggin'. Don't let anything get you down.

August 21, 2014 at 11:47PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

4
Reply
Cineman

People can call themselves whatever they like if it helps them get the job done. In the end they'll be judged on the quality of their work, not the quality of their title.

August 14, 2014 at 8:38PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

4
Reply
Ben Howling

+1

August 15, 2014 at 4:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

2
Reply

Ahh....The old negative and bitter filmmaker.

Mind your own business. People will call themselves whatever they damn please.

August 15, 2014 at 4:11PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

8
Reply
LOL

no.

August 15, 2014 at 6:16PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Tom Barnold

@busta- you have no place on a site like this where it teaches the up and coming film makers to progress, If you believe that a person only merits to wear a title because of how expensive there camera is or how big there office is then your a sad sad person and guys like Robert Rodriguez defy everything you believe in and kill your beliefs with success, you need to stop visiting No Film School immediately you clown!!!!

August 16, 2014 at 9:52AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
max

WTF? One of the most unintelligent responses I've ever read on this site.

August 16, 2014 at 10:51AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Brian

Not to mention (though I will) improper use of "there" instead of "their" and "your" instead of "you're." ;)

August 21, 2014 at 9:22PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

14
Reply

A few years ago I attended a mixer for aspiring 'filmmakers' just to see who was there. Pretty much all 'want-a-be's'. I saw this girl standing alone, not mixing. I introduced myself with just my first name and asked her what she does. 'I'm a filmmaker' she said. Oh, ok, what films have you made I asked? 'Well, none - we're working on our first'. Ok, what's it about? "We're still developing it". Hmmm, where are you in the process? "It's just an idea now but we're coming along." Have you ever done or worked on a film before? "No."
Analysis; here's a person with no experience of any kind, working with a few others to come up with a movie of some sort and she claims she's a 'filmmaker'. For shame! To call oneself a filmmaker one has to have made a film or video movie - otherwise you are just someone who wants to make a movie.

August 21, 2014 at 5:25PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

4
Reply
Bob

I don't think Rodriguez was telling any and everyone to go out and call themselves a filmmaker...he was talking to a class of would-be filmmakers...man you guys are so touchy!

August 23, 2014 at 1:18AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
RAMBR0

@Busta: I will assume that you came fomr a coorporate reality, where you see a CEO as your Holly Grall... and for that you cant define what a CEO is or not. Maybe you never have a company to call it to you. And believe me if you are a Camcorder and a Laptop guy you are much more then only a CEO, you are also a CTO, a COO, CFO and so on. So please stop give to much attention to what this or that is called and begin to define if they are good or not making films for there job instead of there title. I know some really bad CEOs. CEO is not something that you have because you are good, there are out there many CEO bad and mediocre...
P.S. Sorry my english.

May 10, 2015 at 9:54AM

0
Reply
avatar
Tom V
CEO Velocity Studios | Since 1998
88

I think Busta's comment says more about him than about the advice given. If you're a film maker say it loud and proud. Ditto being he CEO of your own little company. Confidence both real and projected is vital in all endeavours. Don;t let people put you down or set your criteria for success. Say it, do it, be it!

August 14, 2014 at 5:03PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

9
Reply
Keith

Right...Busta has an attitude problem...those of us who are actually doing things are positive and don't resent other people being proud of being filmmakers and ceo's...lots of the biggest artists started in bedrooms or garages...same for tech companies

August 14, 2014 at 6:28PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

10
Reply
IgnoreLosers

no.

August 15, 2014 at 6:17PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

7
Reply
Tom Barnold

It got me interested to see how much his budgets are for films.

According to IMDB: Desperado had a budget of $7 million and grossed $25 million in the USA, Sin City had a budget of $40 million and grossed $74 million.

By comparison, Star Trek Into Darkness had a budget of $190 million and grossed $228 million. Dollar for dollar, Rodriguez's films do very well.

August 14, 2014 at 5:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

6
Reply
Sean K

He's a really resouceful guy. One of his newer versions of 10-minute film school talks about making Spy Kids on such a low budget by mainly relying on vfx.

August 14, 2014 at 5:26PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Chuck

You have to consider the marketing budgets too (whatever they are), global theatrical rentals and the related secondary revenues. A $200M film like Star Trek grossed ~ $450M globally and may not have even broken even there, if you add ~ $50M on marketing (though that depends on the merchandising too). Its TV, streaming, video rights would have surely made it very profitable.

August 15, 2014 at 5:41AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

3
Reply
DLD

As long as your working on your film/company every day, you can call yourself a filmmaker/CEO. You're not a hack or a poser if you do the work, you're just not famous. It took me 6 years to make Space Trucker Bruce but I still called myself a filmmaker. However, I made a mistake by telling a Philadelphia cab driver that I was a filmmaker. She was impressed and wanted to know if she'd seen anything I'd made. I had to tell her that I'd only made one low budget film that was available online. So bragging about being a filmmaker can bring awkward questions if you haven't done much.

August 14, 2014 at 5:19PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

8
Reply

I took a weekend off once. Am I still a filmmaker?

August 15, 2014 at 7:30AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

3
Reply
Observer

We're going to let you slide this time. But don't do it again.

August 16, 2014 at 12:34AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

You can call yourself whatever you want, but it's pretty lame when every single student at film school has their own made-up production company name at the beginning of their first short film. If you're not cutting checks or at the very least, using the company's name on location releases and whatnot, just use your own name.

August 14, 2014 at 5:39PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

6
Reply
Chuck

Man this guy is right from the beginning to the end ! Let's go and SHOOT B**TCH !!!!!

August 14, 2014 at 5:41PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

5
Reply
JDG

Dude he sounds like brad pitt in fight club

August 14, 2014 at 6:16PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Andreyiscool

The dude used almost 25 grand to shoot his " 8 grand" movie!

He used his buddy's 16 mm camera; so he didn't have to rent one
and went south of border to get free crew members.

Another 100 grand to 150 grand for film finish, transfer and print to send to SUNDANCE.
And that was done by the fim prodco his new agent got him aligned with.
Have no goddamn idea why people...keep LYING about this story 20 -something years later?!

BUT...I do agree with using what you have free access to.

Because in the digital age; if you're broke...but you have location access for free?
Use it; rewrite your story to fit that locale and go 24-7 at the locale if need be.

Or...just do weekends and nights if you have a paid, day job.
CHRIS NOLAN, his cats and crew spent a whole year on weekends only shooting his feature: THE FOLLOWING.
Used their own money; no one got paid.
Either believe in your self, capable of great sacrifices and work ethic...or...you don't.

August 14, 2014 at 6:27PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

4
Reply
MARK11

Make-out with Violence was kind of like Nolan's setup. They formed a band to earn money and slowly shot over a year or something.

August 14, 2014 at 7:59PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

2
Reply
alex

I'm no fan of Rodriguez, but I do think he actually made El Marachi for 7k. In fact there's a shot of him in the film were if you freeze frame you can see it's only him shooting the scene. Plus, other guys like Chris Noland and Joe Carnahan made their first features for 7k and Grek Arakk made not one but two features for even less, and they were shot in 16mm as well. It's hard to pull of with budgets that low, but it is possible.

August 14, 2014 at 10:31PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
bolex16

He's not saying it wasn't. He's saying that when you add int eh cost of all the freebies he got, it would have added up to a lot more. Most of us won't have those freebies because it comes down to who you know.

August 16, 2014 at 12:39AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

3
Reply

Well, that is exactly the point... he got those freebies! But in a positive sense, not a negative one.

Just like using amazing natural scenery for free. You find what you have available, and you use it!

And if you don't, then you either find a way to work around it, or you get it!

So if you don't have access to a camera, then get work around it with what you have! (perhaps a stop motion film for instance) Or, find a way to get one.... becomes friends with people and find somebody to partner with you.

August 16, 2014 at 2:17AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

9
Reply

I do like the idea of Nolan hiring a bunch of crew, setting up a beautiful scene, prepping it, lighting it and using stand-ins to rehearse. Then completely seriously bringing out of his trailor a carrier with his cats in as the actors!

August 15, 2014 at 6:22AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

14
Reply
William Jones

He shot his original film for $7k, editing on VHS. He showed it to an agent, who took a liking to it, and got a studio to buy it and remaster it for a theatrical release.

What's the lie? He still shot it himself, got his friends and town locals to act in it.

It's not a conspiracy theory. He made a good enough film, someone was willing to buy and put money into to improve the quailty.

It's happened to other filmmakers too.

November 27, 2014 at 6:30PM

3
Reply

He's wrong about one thing. A techie can become creative. I stumbled into it by an inadvertent exposure to fine art. The first time I say a great painting at the age of 33, I felt the ground move beneath me. If you're a hard facts guy, fine art, especially French impressionism seen up close, will change you forever.

August 14, 2014 at 8:23PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
4CardsMan

@4cardsman -- agreed! I myself being techie see a film as a project management endeavor first and foremost. I can sign up the creatives, but hardly other way around. As Michael Tapp mentioned RR is good at delivering public speeches -- I bet this is how he got the folks under his banners to do the stage setups.

August 14, 2014 at 10:27PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Firef1y

Agreed. Film is a very technical process that requires a lot of management and organization. The person who does that management and organization also has to have a soft spot for art/film to even take on the task without a paycheck for a indie no-budget starter film.

I'm one of those creative types who is also technical. I can run cameras, light, color grade, write and think up cool off-the-wall ideas on the spot, but I suck at producing. Organizing people, managing money and call sheets are my enemy. I was lucky years ago to have a friend I grew up with who was really good at that stuff and wanted to make movies too. We made a great team and made a feature film and several short films in our early twenties. But then he moved out of state to get a teaching job and met a woman, got married and bought a new house. So where we used to live a few blocks away(in highschool) and then a few miles away(early twenties) we now live a few hours away (with full time day jobs and kids) and that makes things infinitely more difficult. I haven't made a movie since. Just been doing corporate video work.

Part of it is that I have a hard time with those management aspects of filmmaking, even though I've gotten better since my younger years. The other part is that I don't have anyone to get excited with and bounce ideas off of and work ourselves into that crazy frenzy where we say "hey let's make a movie." I'm a co-dependent filmmaker who needs to work as a team with someone who can balance myself. If I remember correctly, even Rodriquez had a friend that helped him produce El Mariachi or was at least there to be excited with and hold him accountable.

But this makes sense, filmmaking is a collabrative art form. Directors often get the credit, but there is a whole team of people behind the scenes helping to keep each other in check. It's not like painting or even music where one person can do all of it. Sure it can happen, but it's going to look like a one person made movie. Just like a 200 million dollar movie with a team of 500-3000 people is going to look like it was made by a corporation with all the fit and finish that a team that size will bring it.

August 16, 2014 at 1:03AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

16
Reply

This guy is really good in a room. I think that's one of the reasons why he's continued to make films.

August 14, 2014 at 10:11PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

3
Reply

His recommendation about how to expose filmstock is some of the worst filmmaking advice I've ever heard. In fact, that whole video is terrible.

August 14, 2014 at 10:19PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
bolex16

He's brought in approximately 1.1 billion in worldwide sales. I think his advice had panned out for him.

August 14, 2014 at 10:37PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Dave

the editing and gadgetry of this production is really weak. the man/woman who made it will never make a film. as it stands, this piece would have been better as radio. all this flash and technique only means the person who made it is seriously lacking ideas.

August 15, 2014 at 1:30AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

steven, its not about quality of these golden nuggets that matter.. This video was done in vhs days. Not in dslr days. The fact that you are focussing on the technicalities of this video is a testimony of your negative attitude. I bet you complain about video/sound quality even when you watch porn.

August 15, 2014 at 2:03AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

14
Reply
gult

I'm pretty sure this was made by the BBC. I remember it going out on a short-lived series called 'Talking Pictures' or something similar when I was a teenager. I was an aspiring filmmaker then (still am!) and watched my VHS recording of this segment a fair few times. I'm not defending the style of the piece or anything (they're clearly aping a 'guerilla' style), just find it funny people are assuming it's some one-man band production rather than the Beeb.

August 15, 2014 at 3:37AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

21
Reply
Jonathan

For me the biggest enemy is PROCRASTINATION. I just need to crack on and actually do something. (As my wife keeps reminding me...) Found this inspirational.

August 15, 2014 at 4:29AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
S Matthews

Mine too. That and having to pull down a full time job for money to also blame my lack of enthusiasm on...just pathetic. Damn, if I could only go back to 1981 and start over.

August 15, 2014 at 1:50PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

Still relevant after all these years. The only problem is that it makes it sound too easy. It never is.

August 15, 2014 at 5:57AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

You can easily nitpick some of his points (overexposure was a very "1990's" look), but Robert Rodriguez has consistently provided some of the best advice for people interested in getting off of their duff and making a movie. His attitude is one of action, and his points about keeping budgets low to retain creative control have never been more valuable than they are today.

August 15, 2014 at 10:23AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

5
Reply
Marc B

Very nice... Get off the couch and get out there. Only point missed, in this modern era, was to ignore the internet trolls who will tell you that everything you have ever done, and ever will do, sucks.

Stay positive peeps, and think of something good to say to help the moral of those in the trenches that are just trying to figure it out.

August 15, 2014 at 10:47AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

5
Reply

Well Said Charles & Mac B. I often read these comments and wonder what goes through the minds of some people. A little more positivity and encouragement would go a L O N G way. We are all here to learn and better ourselves at the end of the day. Thankfully there are still generous people willing to share their experiences and wisdom with the world.

August 15, 2014 at 12:37PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
S Matthews

Amen to that.

August 15, 2014 at 2:03PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply

Thank you! Some of these comments remind me on an article I read by a professional photographer basically saying that all amateurs were b*stards and should never be allowed to call themselves photographers unless they've trained. Best training is on the job, doing it, learning from mistakes and learning from others who generously share their own advice and experience.

August 22, 2014 at 8:17AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
Stack McGinty

No no, this is all wrong! Lets stay in front of a pc, pixel peep, compare 4k cameras and bitch about sharpness and dynamic ranges.

August 15, 2014 at 6:31PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

12
Reply
einar

“A person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the man doing it.”

August 15, 2014 at 6:35PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

4
Reply
Dave

There is pointless. People do not learn anything about this. Yes you can have an idea and yes you can own a camera and lights. However unless you know how to frame thing and properly light things people are wondering around aimlessly wasting their time and money. Hollywood is a business the only reason to make a feature film (unless you are truly doing it as an art form) is to make money. If you do not know what your doing and its framed all wrong and lit all wrong no one but your family and friends will ever see it. To say its pointless to go to film school is wrong. The thing that is wrong is the people that go to film school thinking they are going to get a job and become an instant millionaire. They are dead wrong. Film school teaches you the things you need to know such as framing. You have to know what the rules are in order to break them the correct way. I went to film school and have won multiple awards and made some money off doing so. However there are lots of people that were in school with me that I watched their work and it fucking sucked. Creativity is not in everyone. Not everyone gets it. Not everyone has what you need to make it big. I am not saying I am big but I must be doing something right. Anyway my rant is over just the main point being don't bash on film school as being pointless because unless you know what your doing and have the great vision and know how to make it happen you will never make money to support yourself in the film industry.

August 15, 2014 at 7:41PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

7
Reply
Cameron

Creativity is not in everyone?? Maybe you don't understand what creativity is.

November 27, 2014 at 6:37PM

6
Reply

This is the first video that ever watched which inspired me to pursue my passion and dreams in guerrilla filmmaking to begin with.

August 16, 2014 at 1:34AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

5
Reply

This is the first video that I ever watched which inspired me to pursue my passion and dreams in guerrilla filmmaking to begin with.

August 16, 2014 at 1:35AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

4
Reply

I don't want to speak ill of Mr. Rodriguez because he was one of my early inspirations to be a filmmaker, along with Raimi and Lucas. I'm 35 now so I was a teenager in the early 90's when Rodriguez was doing all of this. Back then I was learning all about 16mm and indie filmmaking and he was very inspiring. I bought his book and read it twice before loaning it to a friend (bad idea, never got it back) and that too was such an inspiring book.

But that said, there were two things he glossed over in that book. The first being that he knew a teacher who knew an agent. Most of us don't know a guy who knows a Hollywood agent. That right there is a foot in the door the mass majority of us will never get.

Back then if you could make any movie on 16mm film with a 90+ minute run time and guns and action in it, there was a chance you could find distribution somewhere. Just because the cost of making a movie like that (film stock cost alone) would have weeded out most people from making movies. Add to that the fact that American film snobs have always had an obession with subtitles, because somehow subtites turn film into art. But to also have an "in" with a Hollywood agent, well... sold.

When I look back, El Mariachi wasn't a great movie. What made it great was the story behind it. How it was made and at what cost. That's why people bought into it. Not because it was an amazing film on its own.

The second thing is that at the time, Hollywood was looking for Spanish language films by minority filmmakers so they could expand more into that territory. If I remember correctly he mentioned that in the book as well but also glossed over that. Which meant he had a niche kind of product they were looking for at the time.

All of these together show that Rodriguez was the right person at the right place at the right time. The fact that he glossed over these always seemed to me that he either realized this was the hardest thing for anyone to duplicate and as a result didn't dwell on it or that things moved so quickly for him at that stage that he didn't realize himself how lucky he really got.

None of this is to say he doesn't have talent or charisma, because he certainly does. The best piece of advice I'ver ever heard him give is to keep making movies once you've made it so you can stay at the top. That it's not just about getting there but staying there. So I respect the guy highly, but I can't look past the fact that he also got really lucky in a way that most won't be. It's not all just about hard work and using what you've got. You've got to be the right person at the right place at the right time with the right connections and the right ideas. But if you never try and keep trying you'll never know when that will happen or not.

August 16, 2014 at 1:36AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

9
Reply

Your third and fifth paragraph could be summed up as: "he found a niche".

That still holds true today! Not the same niche he used perhaps, but there are still many niches out there to be used and new ones to be found.

I'll totally agree with your conclusion though that he "got lucky", by being in the right place at the right time. But... I'm also reminded by the sayings which go along the lines of "success is 1% luck and 99% perspiration", or "you make your own luck".

August 16, 2014 at 2:24AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

4
Reply

+1

August 16, 2014 at 7:35AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

6
Reply
einar

If luck = preparation + opportunity, then it worked out for him.

It's easy to look at how he could have gotten lucky, but it's easier for an agent to say no than yes. In the end, he made something impressive enough for the agent to be interested. That meant he put the work into it.

Luck isn't always happenstance.

November 27, 2014 at 6:47PM

5
Reply

@busta- you have no place on a site like this where it teaches the up and coming film makers to progress, If you believe that a person only merits to wear a title because of how expensive there camera is or how big there office is then your a sad sad person and guys like Robert Rodriguez defy everything you believe in and kill your beliefs with success, you need to stop visiting No Film School immediately you clown!!!!

August 16, 2014 at 9:51AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
max

Rodriguez and his 10 minute film school is what got me off the couch and into the 48 hour film project. I knew how to edit from high school but that was as far as it went. Grabbed a canon gl1 from public access and a tripod and just went out and did it. Tons of fun and I learned a lot from it. Afterwards I sought out as much information as I could on composition and cinematography and from there learned as much as I could and just kept at it. Point being one can always learn as they go and mistakes will teach you far more than success. Most importantly have fun with it. Enjoy the process. Good luck out there

August 16, 2014 at 3:12PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

14
Reply
Walter vinci

Seeing a white screen and now pre-visualizing the movie, shot by shot and cut by cut, is leading the newcomers astray because movies just are not made that way. It is more like a sculptor who first chisels a rough form and then fine-tunes it. I bet Rodriguez himself does not make his movies this way however 'cool' it may sound to someone who has never made a movie.

August 17, 2014 at 11:54AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

2
Reply
Gul Ramani

This was super awesome!!
Really informative.

August 20, 2014 at 5:05AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

15
Reply

Well as long as you are OK with doing all that and having just 35 youtube views to show for it, you're good! I've done that and have no problem with it. But I'm not trying to make a living at it, and mostl likely never will. Hey I'm a film-maker too, but don't have any cards. I'm also a musician, and never made a penny at it, never wanted to. Most of the lead guitarists of all the great 60's bands made less money in their lives than guys working for the post office. Nothing wrong with following your dreams and doing it all, as long as you don't lose sight of reality. If you are in it for trhe art, no one will stop you. If you are in it for the money, you'll make a better living working for the post office.

August 21, 2014 at 6:15PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

9
Reply
Bob

First read his book it's very inspiring.
The film El mariachi it's still his best film ? why
I watch the film many,many time and looking for answer, i find, we get in the story because actor look like ordinary people they do mistake in running or speaking or acting like we do in the real life. SO WE BELIEVE.
The film it's like a loop and repeat but it's also different. They looking for him and find him and run after... it' HAPPEN 3 TIME and the story increase in tension like in a video game.
He shot with an arri S but with a small zoom and a wide lens prime but the camera move are done the way we shot in digital few year later.THE SHOOTING WAY WAS MORE MODERN.

A team want to start making film emulsion in Italia , and they like to produce a positive film
here the link and they like to know what you think about film and what you are looking for. Only 13% of the image it capture on film today , video it's less of 3%, the majority it's data file now.
I think film must stay as a artistic choice:
go there and fill the survey

http://www.filmferrania.com/?utm_source=FILM+Ferrania&utm_campaign=27f45...

I did the survey but they like to made some film reversible in color !

August 21, 2014 at 10:39PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

6
Reply
Pierre Samuel Rioux

Practical, quick, & no nonsense approach to film making !

December 14, 2014 at 1:02PM

7
Reply
avatar
Phillip Ramirez
Actor / Producer
81