March 10, 2015

Is High Production Value Just Hairspray? How 'Buzzard' Champions Guerilla Filmmaking

Can setting up elaborate shots with time-consuming tools zap the soul out of your film? Joel Potrykus, the director of Buzzard, a film being called one of the most original American films to emerge in some time, suggests that not only do you not need high production value, but it might be taking away from the essence of your story.

When the film premiered at SXSW, No Film School sat down with Joel to talk about Buzzard, which has just been released on VOD/Digital this week. From putting a wireless mic on his main actor inside McDonalds, committing to a camera in the lead actor's face, to rehearsing for eight whole months, Joel embodies the microbudget, punk-rock ethos of DIY filmmaking.

Before you read the interview, or watch the full film, here is the Buzzard trailer for your perusal:

NFS: Buzzard was shot in Michigan. Why shoot there instead of, say, going to a place with a bigger film industry?

Joel Potrykus: Well, we live in Michigan, first off. The number one benefit is it’s cheaper to shoot in Michigan. There aren't a lot of people doing it, so the police won’t stop you. You don’t have to get permits for anything. It’s super cheap. If you get to set and you forget, like, the right lens, you just say, "Hold on, I’ll be back in 5 minutes, let me go get it." It takes five minutes to get from one side of the town to the other. I don’t think any of us are really wanting to live that Hollywood lifestyle just yet. It’s easy and cheap and you can get away with just about anything.

NFS: And at No Film School, we’re always interested in micro budgets.

Joel: I feel like we’re the kings of micro budget.

NFS: Could you elaborate a little on that?

Joel: I can’t disclose the budget for this film, but I can tell you the budget for my last film Ape was $3,000. The cost to put us up at our festival was more than the budget for the whole movie. We buy our equipment and we just sell it on eBay after we use it. It’s going to be outdated technology in six months anyway. So, we are all about micro budgets. Catering consists of mostly McDonald's or Little Caesars. Everybody on the cast and crew, mostly crew, are part of our film band and we don’t get paid to make them. Hopefully we make money off the films, and then we get paid percentages. Everyone is in it because they dig it and they believe in it.

NFS: So what do you do when some guy comes over and --

Joel: -- Says, "Hey you can’t shoot here,"?

NFS: Yes.

Joel: We shot on the bus, on the city bus, once. We tried to get permission for that. They said, "It’ll be $100 per hour and you can shoot." I was ok with that. I was like, "We can get this shot in under an hour, that’s easy." But then they read the script and were like, “Oh, well we feel like this doesn’t put public transportation in a very good light, so unfortunately we will not be able to oblige that.” So then we were like, "Ok, our camera can fit in a backpack, so let’s go shoot it and not tell anyone." That’s the beauty of DSLR and all digital cameras -- we just do it, even if they say no. And they don’t even know what we’re doing! We shot on a bus in a Greyhound station. Nobody knew we were filming. We just kind of sneak in everything -- the ultimate guerrilla filmmaking.

I can’t disclose the budget for this film, but I can tell you the budget for my last film Ape was $3,000.

NFS: Nobody at the Greyhound station noticed because they were all passed-out, asleep?

Joel: There was a guy in the foreground of our shot who was sleeping. He’s sleeping, and he doesn’t know we’re filming, and our actor Joshua Burge is behind him in the shot, pretending to sleep in the shot. So, to give Josh his cue I just went “BOO!” But it also woke up the guy who was sleeping. So in the shot, they both wake up at the same time. It was beautiful.

NFS: I know you’ve worked on Super 8 a lot in the past, but you decided to shoot on DSLR for this?

Joel: All my short films were Super 8 -- but then I wanted to do a feature. I like the look of film and everything, and I don’t like what video looks like. But the first time I saw footage from like, a Canon 7D, I was fooled. I thought it was 16mm, and I was like, "Ok I’m in." Shooting on film, sync sound is a problem; with Super 8 sound is a nightmare. Once I saw DSLR footage, it got me. We shot Ape on a Canon 60D, we shot Buzzard on Canon 5D Mark III with a little Tascam audio recorder. Then I just sold it on eBay -- the next version is just gonna be cheaper and better!

NFS: What lenses did you pair with your 5D for this kind of production?

Joel: This one was different because we actually had a DP. I don’t think I ever had an actual DP before. Adam J. Minnick lives in Austin; he’s my friend from Michigan. We’ve been friends forever. I thought if there was gonna be one guy to shoot it, I trust my friend Adam. He’s way more tech nerdy. He knows what we’re going for. He and I kind of work on the same page. He was very adamant about getting some Zeiss prime lenses. We started shooting it on the Zeiss 50mm, but after a few days, I started to see that the 80mm was the one I really liked. Then the 135mm I really, really liked. I like the long lenses. It looks better than anything else I’ve done.

We rehearsed for eight months -- That’s ideally what it’s all about: rehearse so much that everybody can bounce off each other.

NFS: I hear you rehearse with your actors for many, many months ahead of time?

Joel: That’s the luxury you have when you’re not working with a studio. We rehearsed for eight months. The producers and the cast would show up once a week. We’d hang out for like five hours. It’s not just rehearsing, it’s like everybody would read parts of the script. It was kind of a way cooler table reading. Just hearing the words spoken out loud, everybody kind of contributes ideas to the script. And Josh could really work on the character. It was a solid eight months. Any anybody who had any part, even a bit part, they had to come in and work on the script with us for three or four hours to make it sound natural. We didn’t want it to sound fake and phony and scripted, so they just came in and we did it over and over and over until they know the lines. Then you get to the point where you can improvise and change it up and not confuse the other person. That’s ideally what it’s all about: rehearse so much that everybody can bounce off each other. So it was ideal. I don’t know if we’ll ever have that opportunity to rehearse for that long again!

NFS: This sounds like a kind of Cassavettes-ensemble-rehearsal process. Having worked with your lead actor before, is there an understanding that develops between you over time?

Joel: Josh and I have our own language where I can go on set and be like, “You know we gotta go like -- And he’ll be like “I got it.” There aren't any real directions, just a bunch of ums and ahs. I was talking to an actor in Michigan about the next feature. And he was like, "Give me a shot, I’ll come in to the audition and I’ll kill it. Whatever you want! I can be your lead." I just looked at him and I said, "I’m sorry, we already have a lead singer." That’s how I refer to it. Josh is the lead singer. The face of the band, the movie. He’s our guy.

NFS: Did Josh have acting experience before your films?

Joel: He has done a lot of plays, and I think he’d done a lot of acting in high school. He went to film school. He was in Coyote, but he didn’t have any lines. There was no dialogue in Coyote. So Ape was his first time with actual dialogue with someone. So, he’s a seasoned pro in Buzzard. I consider him one of the best actors around today. He’s just -- he’s that good! He’s doesn't just have the ability to act; he’s got a look and a persona that you can’t practice or make. He’s got the look. Like an evil Buster Keaton!

We put a wireless microphone on him in all these public locations, and had him do it. He likes it. That’s my favorite part. There’s some element of surprise, you don't know what’s going to happen.

NFS: How did Josh like working within the guerrilla filmmaking style of the production?

Joel: We put a wireless microphone on him in all these public locations, and had him do it. He likes it. That’s my favorite part. There’s some element of surprise, you don't know what’s going to happen. He’s always down with that. He was a little nervous during Ape when we had him walk down the street three times with an actual Molotov cocktail. In the middle of the day on a busy street. He was a little nervous for that! And then he had to light it in all one shot. Walk down the street for 5 minutes, come to this place, light it and throw it. "OK, take 2." That made him a little nervous, I understand that. But he is the kind of guy that’s kind of a little unsure about the whole situation, but as soon as you yell action he turns in to the character. You couldn’t convince anyone he had any reservations about doing scenes' he’s instantly committed.

NFS: That kind of shooting style doesn’t really allow for fancy gadgets and tools of high production value.

Joel: I’m very much against all that kind of stuff. I think crane shots, big jibs, all the things that slows it down and require trucks to move around, that’s not art to me. That’s construction work. I think it zaps any kind of momentum you have. It’s like when Poison and Warrant were big in the 1980s. Cranes and jibs, that’s all hairspray, just to make your production look fancy and slick and have a high production value. But if it doesn’t have heart and soul, it’s nothing. I’m all about the soul and the essence. I think working with elaborate productions zaps that feeling. That’s just me.

NFS: The timing to be able to move quickly -- 

Joel: You’re sitting around waiting for roadies to haul your gear and set it up. That’s no fun. You should be like, rock and roll!

NFS: How did you handle lighting?

Joel: All natural.

NFS: So did you get to a location, and then shoot where you could find light?

Joel: We scheduled the shoots out we so knew where the sun was going to be at certain times. We had some footage in a basement. I think we had a china ball down there. That was it. Otherwise it was just whatever light was there. That’s why we picked the 5D Mark III, because of the low light capabilities. If we needed to go shoot somewhere at night, sometimes we’d just drive around until we saw good lighting. That’s where the scene would happen. Again, that’s my favorite kind of stuff. Stuff that’s not planned out, where you just wing it. You can’t do that if you have a cast and crew of 40-50 people. But when you have a carload of people, it’s easy. You just drive around and find your spot!

NFS: What if drone technology gets better? Would you put the 5D on a quadcopter and follow Josh around?

Joel: No, no! I don’t think I would. It doesn’t have the same feeling as being eye-level with someone. Technology can never replace putting the camera in someone’s face and just watch them deliver their lines. Or have a camera walking with someone. That puts you there. All that stuff is cool, and James Cameron will have a lot of fun with it, but it’s not my bag.

Guys like me, we’re just trying to keep the big guys in check and show them they’re wasting their money. We’re going against the system.

NFS: Do you think Michigan audiences will like Buzzard?

Joel: I think people are people. As a whole, when you’re outside of a film festival, people are not as receptive to independent filmmaking as people at a film festival. I think you get a lot more mixed reactions, and a lot more walk-outs if I showed it at the local multiplex. I don’t think people would be going in expecting some kind of heavy metal slacker nightmare movie. There are cool people in Michigan that will dig it, and probably a lot of boring people in Michigan that would not dig it. We’ll see! They all know what to expect after seeing Ape, which has a similar feel to it.

NFS: What do you think is the value of having independent film? For stories that wouldn’t be playing at the Multiplex?

Joel: Well, obviously, the term for independent film is shifting quite a bit. Most of them are winning Oscars and the budgets are $40 million. Guys like me, we’re just trying to keep the big guys in check and show them they’re wasting their money. We’re going against the system. That’s what it’s all about. Trying to do it a different way. Show them how punk rockers did it in the late 1970s! We started a band in a garage on shitty equipment -- and we’re better than you guys! The Ramones are better than Led Zeppelin. That’s what we’re out for, to do it in a different way, cut out the waste and get down to what’s important. The art of it. No gloss! Just honesty.

NFS: Do you have advice for other filmmakers?

Joel: I always say don’t be afraid to rip off things you like. Almost every shot that’s ever done in any movie is ripped off from something else. Eventually you get your own voice from stealing other people's voices. I have no problem saying what I ripped off -- you put them all together and it makes something new.


Thank you, Joel!

If you want to check out Buzzard for yourself, you can find it on iTunes, Amazon and various other platforms through the film's official site.

What do think of Joel's style of filmmaking? Have you helmed similar productions?     

Your Comment

41 Comments

I hope this director likes working that way forever, because he's doing himself a disservice limiting his aesthetics like that. Blanket statements like "that's construction work, not art" do not instill trust or imply any premeditation to the visual strategy of the film.

"Oooh! That looks good, shoot that!" takes no skill and when you can't explain why or how you want something set up, you really can't expect to work with a crew outside of your buddies.

My 2c.

March 10, 2015 at 1:08PM

0
Reply
avatar
Taylor Russ
Director of Photography
654

P.S. I would totally watch this movie. Just looks downright earnest in its performances and hilarious in its tone.

March 10, 2015 at 6:28PM

5
Reply
avatar
Taylor Russ
Director of Photography
654

Just to be clear, if I'm going to spend 8 months rehearsing, I'd never get to set and say, "Oooh! That looks good, shoot that!"

March 11, 2015 at 9:58AM

6
Reply

I found a lot of inspiration from watching buzzard.
Its a great reminder story trumps all.
Thanks for making it Joel.

March 14, 2015 at 3:49AM

2
Reply
avatar
Daniel Reed
Hat Collector
1374

" Guys like me, we’re just trying to keep the big guys in check and show them they’re wasting their money. We’re going against the system. That’s what it’s all about.".

Having a cast rehearse for 8 months without paying them isn't punk or rock and roll...

March 10, 2015 at 2:04PM

0
Reply
LJ
594

We all get paid in percentage points of the profit, including me. The less you spend, then more you keep. It's important, and it's why I've held onto the same cast and crew for the last 5 years. They get respect, cash, and recognition.

March 11, 2015 at 10:26AM

0
Reply

I like the trailer, but dont quite know what the point is. I only understood the rebellion aspect of the story after the times quote. So aside from raw in my face action and sound with some jokes it seems like it could be a good time, but still wouldnt sell me.

If after rehearsing for 3-4 months once a week doesnt allow your actors to imrov the character or play with the lines then its pre production masterbation. In 8 months Id expect almost Daniel Day Lewis type involvement from the actor to character.

I dont get the non disclosure of the budget. It matters very little to me since I can see how to emulate alot of this look for cheap but its silly to flat out say you wont talk about it.

March 10, 2015 at 5:02PM

5
Reply
avatar
Chris Hackett
Director, Director of Photography, Writer
908

Probably ashamed of having any budget because that's not artistic.

March 10, 2015 at 6:02PM

0
Reply
avatar
Taylor Russ
Director of Photography
654

He seems like a guy who would brag about the budget. I'd bet it's cause he is under some contractual obligation not to, or is looking for some distribution deal and was advised not to.

March 10, 2015 at 8:19PM

3
Reply
avatar
Michael Markham
Actor/Filmmaker
921

Bingo.

March 11, 2015 at 10:30AM

4
Reply

The rehearsals period always for total improvisation. My original script changed immensely after goofing around and trying new things in that long rehearsal period.

Any filmmaker going to a big film hopes to sell their film to a distributor (in the US and overseas). Disclosing the budget gives a distributor a idea of how much they can offer to pay for the film. It's important to protect the "value" of a film.

March 11, 2015 at 10:29AM

5
Reply

I can see that. I took it for brovado instead of business sense. Even with changing the script its alot of time but to each their own, did you feel at many points in that long rehearsal that the film was ready until someone tried something new during a rehearsal? What kept that going?

March 11, 2015 at 11:11AM

1
Reply
avatar
Chris Hackett
Director, Director of Photography, Writer
908

Valuable information. :) I'm not that far yet, but this is good to know.

March 12, 2015 at 5:29AM

1
Reply
avatar
Gilles van Leeuwen
Filmmaker
363

With the democratization of so many filmmaking tools these days, there is no excuse for your film to look like crap. It's just laziness. I guess laziness is an excuse.

March 10, 2015 at 5:31PM

1
Reply
avatar
L. Gabriel Gonda
Director
83

I love the ability to be totally lazy and still premiere my film at SXSW. Best of both worlds.

March 11, 2015 at 10:31AM, Edited March 11, 10:31AM

11
Reply

the trailer doesn't look like crap to me. was this just a generic comment about film in the youtube generation? or was there something particular you were missing in the trailer?

March 11, 2015 at 2:01PM

0
Reply
matthew david wilder
Director/Cameraman/Editor/Colorist
164

This way of approaching a film might work for a particular project, such as this one. But to only want to work this way seems a bit strange to me. Like he's scared of success. I did some "construction" this past weekend and it felt right. I've worked like this before also (and still do on super low budget music vids) and I hate it. There's nothing wrong with wanting more for your productions. There's nothing wrong with wanting to be better. There's too much competition out here to be half assing it.

March 10, 2015 at 6:38PM

3
Reply
avatar
Don Way
Writer/Director of Photography
961

It's interesting that you call this kind of working "half assing it". From what I can see in the trailer, this style works perfectly for the story being told, and to capture it a different way would lose something, though it might gain an aesthetic or 'value' to the visuals. (the sound is pretty clear in the trailer, so good on 'em). Derek Cianfrance shot Blue Velvet in a certain order over a longer period of time, giving the actors time to live together in between the two sections of principal photography. In which time they did a lot of creative work on their characters and story as well as shooting home video to use in the film. This gives their performances and the story a particular feel that it would be difficult to get otherwise. How is that so different than choosing to shoot this way because this is what you have available to you and choosing to tell a story that is fed by shooting this way? You can't shoot "Unbroken" or "The Imitation Game" this way. It doesn't serve the story and would look like crap. Fast doesn't mean lazy, and doesn't mean it can't serve the story being told.

At the same time to denigrate other styles of story telling as he does, implying they can't produce truthful story telling (construction/hairspray) is just arrogance.

March 10, 2015 at 8:17PM

0
Reply
avatar
Michael Markham
Actor/Filmmaker
921

"This way of approaching a film might work for a particular project, such as this one." was my very first sentence. I was saying that it completely works for this film. Sorry if I wasn't clear about that. Agree with everything you said.Judging from the trailer, this was the perfect way to shoot this film because it serves the attitude of the story. What I was criticizing is his implied plans to continue to shoot this way because he thinks they're "keeping the big guys in check" and "going against the system" lol. I don't like the films of directors who use the same style for any and every story. What I do like is when people write around the style as opposed to forcing a predetermined, done ten times, style upon something that doesn't call for said style. I think Quentin Tarantino is the perfect example of writing around a style. But once he got to "Inglorious Bastards" he clearly couldn't have shot it like Res Dogs, Pulp Fiction, True Romance etc. If this guy is gonna write around this style then I'm all for it and will probably turn out to be a long term supporter. Definitely gonna pay the 7 bucks to watch the film.

March 10, 2015 at 9:02PM, Edited March 10, 9:02PM

2
Reply
avatar
Don Way
Writer/Director of Photography
961

fyi True Romance was directed by Tony Scott.

March 10, 2015 at 11:39PM, Edited March 10, 11:39PM

2
Reply
LJ
594

Damn, never knew that.

March 11, 2015 at 5:21PM, Edited March 11, 5:21PM

0
Reply
avatar
Don Way
Writer/Director of Photography
961

I think you guys are missing the point. So many filmmakers become so obsessed with the best production value that they waste time and money in putting focus on professionalism rather than story/character/realism. I think when you apply rules to an art like filmmaking saying you must have a full crew, it must have dollies, epic jib shots etc -you can easily loose the soul of the story and the heartbeat that fuels it (although yes, the same can be said for over rehearsing for 8 months lol). I for one spend way too much time obsessing over gear and commend this guy for making a run and gun feature with what/who he has at his disposal. Can you pay actors/crew if you have no money? Does that mean you shouldn't make films?

March 10, 2015 at 6:38PM

14
Reply
avatar
Stephen Herron
Writer/Director
1312

You're not wrong! It was just the wording that irked so many.

March 11, 2015 at 2:39PM

0
Reply
avatar
Taylor Russ
Director of Photography
654

Just want to share this, we are also doing it with low budget:
https://vimeo.com/82595265

Hope everyone enjoy it!

March 10, 2015 at 6:41PM, Edited March 10, 6:41PM

0
Reply
avatar
Matias Rispau
Director
142

More power to you man. Make your art. Congrats. I hope to get to see the film. What's next on your docket of stories to tell?

For those here saying it's "wrong" not to pay people. If everyone is on board, and everyone gets an equitable cut of the film (if it makes money) then great. Personally I'd rather pay people and not have to deal with paying them later. But I also live in NYC where their time is "more" valuable because it costs so much to live her.

I also value the contribution of professional actors, being one myself. I love the idea of having time to rehearse. And it's great that his situation affords that. But I think professional actors can bring you a lot more to the table, where it comes to a variety of colors/characterization and specificity that I rarely see from "non-actors". But that's just my experience.

March 10, 2015 at 7:59PM

0
Reply
avatar
Michael Markham
Actor/Filmmaker
921

FWIW, Josh, the lead in this film, just wrapped an Inaritu film starring Leo Dicaprio. So I don't think we can fairly consider him a "non-actor."

March 14, 2015 at 10:53AM

0
Reply
Nate Ford
editor/filmmaker
81

Glad this is working for him but those with budgets and production beyond Joel's personal tastes aren't necessarily wasting time or money. I appreciate his ability to make something out of limited gear but that doesn't mean the other guys are doing it wrong.

March 10, 2015 at 8:55PM

3
Reply
avatar
William Stewart
Director of Photography
513

Nice read with some interesting thoughts.
Low budget, but rehearsing for eight months is still quite an investment, btw.
I think it's great if you have such a dedicated team :-)

However, I'm not sure I would feel confortable feeding my team unhealthy fastfood...

Everybody now feeling insulted by the hairspray comment: chill out, look at the messenger.
Everyone is almost always defending his/her own choices. In this case the choice to keep shooting simple.
That is not a new idea or a new concept.
Dogma restricted itself just like that and even more.
It forces the filmmaker to really focus on the story, but I think it should always be the focus: with or without complicated grip.

March 11, 2015 at 6:29AM

3
Reply
avatar
WalterBrokx
Director, DOP, Writer, Editor, Producer
8480

We made salads and fancy tacos once in awhile too. Indian and Thai a couple times, too.

March 11, 2015 at 10:33AM

9
Reply

Enjoyable article. Trailer looks terrific also.

If aspiring for high production values comes at the expense of other things it can of course be bad for Indies, we see it all the time. And plenty of people do confuse the technical execution of a shot as being almost the sole component required to make exciting or meaningful cinema. But really, even that's understandable. There is just so much to learn in film making, so many possibilities, and so many component parts that ultimately need to pull in the same direction at the same time, to make a great shot, let alone a great, scene, sequence or film.

I've certainly watched some of my own scenes back in the edit and gone, oh fuck, I wish I just got a few more singles and forgot the elaborate dolly shot because in the edit it feels to contrived. It has given me deeper appreciation for quality hand held work and simplicity and I am careful of what I will sacrifice greater coverage for. Yet at the same time it has increased my respect for those who take a polished high end aesthetic and really make it work for their story. It's not enough just to dolly in... just the speed of the push will denote emotion, dictate what will best cut with what, the length of the shot, parallax, focus, let alone what's happening in the frame are all assuredly an important part of the art, and it can absolutely elevate a moment.

But I think Joel is certainly right from a Guerilla perspective. Really anything that takes up a lot of time can suck the life of a scene or a shoot day. He has clearly focused on story and performance, and to me it really shows. It's a lot stronger trailer than you see for most low or no budget Indies covered here on NFS. So I think he probably deserves a bit more respect than many are giving. Time is so precious on a film set, and nuanced performance and character/story are ultimately the most important elements. It's sound advice.

And Joel's right that any shot that clearly draws attention to itself at times will get in the way of the scene and story. Be it dolly or Jib, or jarring handheld work for that matter. But of course it's all art. Ultimately camera movement or anything else is governed only by the moment as to it's correctness. Anything that works is right, and anything that doesn't is wrong... so everything is always on the table... unless you don't want it to be, or can't make it happen.

March 11, 2015 at 9:48AM

6
Reply

I think that's he's full of it.

March 11, 2015 at 9:51AM, Edited March 11, 9:51AM

0
Reply
avatar
Ruben Jesus
Director
83

Don't believe a word I say.

March 11, 2015 at 12:49PM

12
Reply

Dear most people in this thread.

You're all jealous of Joel because he's confident in his own artistic style and he got into SXSW.

Money takes the heart out of everything, not just film.

Joel is keeping it real and proving to the world that films aren't powerful because of the money.

Get a life.

March 11, 2015 at 4:43PM

4
Reply

LOL

That point has been proven many times.
Everyone was simply commenting on the apparent definitive attitude of the statements. Whether that was intended or not is another thing, but that's how it came across.

I've seen plenty of movies with plenty of heart that had plenty of money behind them. I'm certain you have as well.

Let's not be black and white about something as grey as art, folks.

March 11, 2015 at 9:13PM

9
Reply
avatar
Taylor Russ
Director of Photography
654

nice post

March 11, 2015 at 5:13PM

0
Reply
bhanu
74

this was very inspirational and i can't wait to see the film. thank you joel.

March 11, 2015 at 6:41PM

0
Reply

Sick man!!!
Although this film doesn't really look like my style, I really appreciate and support your entire approach at it. I don't know how these people have the balls to hate on this. You literally took a film that a studio would spend $30 million to make and call it "low budget" film and made it for a super low budget. Much respect for that, and everyone should appreciate that. I think everyone here is just jealous cause they spend so much money on equipment, permits and catering to make a shitty ass movie that leaves em broke and doesn't get seen by anyone outside the indie world. Respect the hustle people!

March 11, 2015 at 10:51PM

0
Reply
avatar
Frogy
Director / Shooter / Cutter
301

I've shot a film with kind of style and approach, 16 day shoot, no camera assistant of gaffer, etc. It was a lot of fun and I would do it again, however my main concern with these is safety issues. Joel, have you come up against any safety problems? What happens if an actor gets seriously injured? Do you cover them in any way with this low budget style?

March 12, 2015 at 9:33PM, Edited March 12, 9:33PM

0
Reply
Leuke
84

Joel,
First off, your trailer looks great! Attention grabbing and funny!

Second, no one on here can tell another filmmaker whats wrong or right.......it's film/art...it's not supposed to be an answer to a fact based question. It's a statement from the artist/creators perspective. Everything else is just opinions.

Your film made it into SXSW which is a huge accomplishment! No one can take that away, no matter how many crewmembers they can hire or cranes they can buy. I'm guessing most of them have never premiered at SXSW either.
I know I haven't yet!

Now....my main question. When you place an actor in McDonald's or on a city bus. What do you do about all the other people in the shot...the ones that don't know they are being filmed?
Are you saying fuck it and hope they don't sue later on or do you chase them down and get waivers after the fact?
That's the only thing that I could see fucking up your run and gun style in the long run.

March 14, 2015 at 3:19AM

5
Reply
mark dossett
FILM MAKER
81

Francis Ford Coppola: To me, the great hope is that now these little 8mm video recorders and stuff have come out, and some... just people who normally wouldn't make movies are going to be making them. And you know, suddenly, one day some little fat girl in Ohio is going to be the new Mozart, you know, and make a beautiful film with her little father's camera recorder. And for once, the so-called professionalism about movies will be destroyed, forever. And it will really become an art form. That's my opinion.

March 14, 2015 at 6:54PM

0
Reply

Nice work Joel! Really liked the movie. Everything is a remix, enjoyed the references.

March 17, 2015 at 7:06PM

6
Reply
avatar
Aron Thor
Filmmaker/student
88