August 29, 2017

Canon Releases Breakthrough 85mm f/1.4L IS Lens

Canon 85mm f/1.4L IS lens
Canon releases its first full-frame lens with both a maximum aperture of f/1.4 and image stabilization.

Canon announced the release of its new 85mm f/1.4L IS lens, which is impressive in that it's not only Canon's first 85mm lens with image stabilization (IS), but it's also the company's first full-frame lens with a 1.4 aperture.

Canon does have a faster 85mm lens (Canon EF 85mm f/1.2 L II), but this new 85mm f/1.4 is still very fast. With four stops of image stabilization, the newer lens is also potentially more useful for run-and-gun film makers who are often shooting handheld, and more affordable at $1,599.00 than the 85mm f/1.2 which retails for $1,899.99.

Canon 85mm f/1.4 IS Lens
Credit: Canon Rumors

Also, if you're shooting on an APS-C sensor camera (like the Canon EOS 7D), you get all of the fast-glass-goodness of this Canon lens with a crop factor that gives it a focal length equivalent of almost 135mm (a staple focal length for many filmmakers). 

This new Canon 85mm f/1.4 IS lens has all the professional features you'd expect (9-blade rounded aperture, dust and water resistance, fast auto-focusing, an aspherical element which reduces chromatic aberration and lens distortion, and ASC coating on the lens to reduce ghosting and lens flares). It is also lighter than its 85mm f/1.2 counterpart. Weighing in at just 2.09lbs it's about .17lbs lighter despite being nearly 30% longer (4.1" vs 3.3"). 

With expected availability in mid-November, you can pre-order the 85mm f/1.4L IS lens now.

Tech Specs:

  • EF Mount
  • 85mm Focal Length
  • f/1.4 Maximum Aperture
  • Image Stabilization
  • 77mm Front Diameter

Your Comment

7 Comments

"company's first full-frame lens with a 1.4 aperture"
is that true? Im pretty sure they have the 24mm, 35mm, and 50mm 1.4 for Full frame. None of those have IS though

August 29, 2017 at 4:06PM, Edited August 29, 4:17PM

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135mm is a staple for filmmakers because it's a 135, not because an 85mm in APS-C equals the same angle of view a 135mm would in full frame...

August 29, 2017 at 5:15PM

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Especially as most cinema cameras closely resemble the sensor size of APS-C anyway, so an 85mm would look like an 85mm, and a 135mm on an APS-C looks the way it does, whatever the full frame equivalent may be.

August 29, 2017 at 9:25PM

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Jake
Hobbyist Filmmaker
157

what in the world are you talking about...

August 30, 2017 at 9:29AM

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They're saying that 135mm is a staple, and 85mm is not. This means that filmmakers commonly affix a 135mm lens to their cinema cameras.

The article pointlessly notes that an 85mm lens on a cinema camera (which means Super 35 or APS-C) gives you the field of view of a 135mm lens on a full-frame camera. But so what? We've already established that it's a 135mm lens ON A CINEMA CAMERA that produces the "staple" field of view (which happens to be similar to a 216mm lens on a full-frame camera).

September 3, 2017 at 5:44PM, Edited September 3, 5:45PM

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David Gurney
DP
1529

If this is a breakthrough ...then they are light years behind the competition .... i suspect this story is not well put together

August 30, 2017 at 9:30AM

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Too bad Canon's own video cameras (like the C200) don't have a focusing wheel to drive the motors in their own lenses. Why should we be rigging up cumbersome follow-focus assemblies on the outside of lenses that have focusing motors BUILT INTO THEM?

Canon's lack of innovation (or, sometimes, even common sense) continues to baffle the industry and confound would-be customers.

September 3, 2017 at 5:35PM, Edited September 3, 5:35PM

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David Gurney
DP
1529