» Posts Tagged ‘color-correction’

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What is a Colorist - International Colorist AcademyColorists are often the last thing people think about on many lower-budget projects, but besides a good sound editor, they are what bring your video to the next level. A good colorist is capable of (within reason) making your footage match perfectly from shot to shot, and they are often a great second set of eyes to give you a new perspective on what your project is about and how it can look its best. More »

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DaVinci Resolve 10 Now ShippingBlackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve 10 finally entered public Beta back in September, and many of you have already begun using it for new projects. You can take version 9 projects into 10, but not the other way around, so starting something in 10 until today meant you were pushing forward with software that wasn’t quite complete yet (though stable for most uses). There is also some information that has been overlooked, and that’s related to the Lite version of the DaVinci Resolve color grading suite. More »

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Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve 10 Public BetaBlackmagic announced DaVinci Resolve 10 at NAB 2013 just a year after introducing DaVinci Resolve 9, which has become one of the more popular color grading suites out there (with Resolve Lite being the best — and possibly only — free grading program). Resolve has become the go-to grading application for many productions, especially since Lite gives you almost all of the the features of the $1,000 version (Noise Reduction being one of the main differences). Resolve 9 still comes with the now $2,000 Blackmagic Cinema Camera 2.5K, but the company is giving all current and future owners a free upgrade to Resolve 10, which was officially released today during the IBC show. Check out some of the new features below. More »

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Canon’s 4K video capable DSLR, the EOS-1D C, has marked an upset for the DSLR industry — and in more ways than one. Many feel that the addition of Motion-JPEG alone is not worth the camera’s $12K price point. This is particularly the case when weighing in controversial speculation that internally it’s mostly identical to its $7K 1080p sibling, the 1D X — and the fact that Canon is likely anticipating with gritted teeth the possibility of firmware hacks 4K-ifying the 1D X. That said, it could be a near-perfect blend of features depending on your application. If this is the case for you, but you want the chance to check out or grade some full-res video footage before pulling the trigger, you’re in luck — planet5D has just posted some downloadable 1D C 4K footage for your viewing consideration (assuming of course your machine can handle it). More »

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Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve 9 has seen a number of updates since its release over the summer, and even though many have been waiting for the full version that comes with their Blackmagic Cinema Camera, the free version, DaVinci Resolve Lite, is almost exactly the same , with just a few limitations in terms of nodes and resolutions. We’ve featured a few tutorials on the software so far, so if you’re unfamiliar with it, be sure to check them out. Click through for all of the additions in the new Resolve version 9.1. More »

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Is it possible we’re losing something through the non-destructive way in which we decide the final look of our shots? The answer, quaintly enough, is absolutely yes — but what, exactly? Simplicity. True finesse in color timing is something Dale Grahn (Saving Private Ryan, Gladiator, Munich, Apocalypse Now: Redux) knows a lot about, and in a true chemical timing sense — which says a lot about the power of bold and minimal control over imagery. Lucky for any of us looking to learn from the experience, Mr. Grahn is asking you to match his own color grades by way of a new iPad app — and in the process interact with the very essentials of color grading. More »

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With the Blackmagic Cinema Camera just on the horizon (sooner rather than later, hopefully), one of the big hurdles for many people is trying to understand the new RAW workflow with Cinema DNG files. Since the camera includes Blackmagic’s color grading suite, DaVinci Resolve 9, the RAW files can be brought into that program and then converted into something with a more manageable bitrate and color space for editing purposes. Colorist Dan Moran over at Philip Bloom’s blog takes a look at DaVinci, and gives a nice and simple tutorial to get you started working with and color grading RAW files. More »

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While the Blackmagic Cinema Camera is a great value for the hardware contained within, there is another huge benefit to buying the camera: it comes free with Blackmagic’s powerful color correction/grading program DaVinci Resolve. While the newest version, DaVinci Resolve 9, was set to be released in July, it has been slightly delayed (along with the camera). Blackmagic has, however, released a beta version of the program which is free to download from their site. Alexis Van Hurkman, a writer/director/colorist who we’ve covered here in the past with his post-NAB Resolve 9 demo, takes a look at some of his favorite features that are new to version 9. More »

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If you’ve been reading this site for the past few months, you know we’ve talked a tremendous amount about a little company called Blackmagic Design who happens to make a little camera called the Cinema Camera. There’s no question the specs are interesting, (and preorders are flying out the door) because there has never been a camera at the $3,000 price point that could give ProRes, DNxHD, and RAW all in one camera body. Not only that, but it happens to come free (that’s right, free) with a color correction/color grading program that used to cost about what you’d pay for a new car until Blackmagic took over the development. That program is called DaVinci Resolve 9, and if you’re curious about what the big deal is, and you’d like to get started with it before you get your Blackmagic Cinema Camera, check out the videos below. More »

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While Adobe CS6 is coming down the pike, maybe you’re like me and are still getting to know CS 5.5, or maybe you’ve been using CS 5.5 for awhile and want to brush up on your editing workflow. In either case, you should check out this Premiere Pro CS 5.5 tutorial by Jarle Leirpoll. He goes over all sorts of useful primary and secondary color correction techniques, including methods for fixing moire, blown-out highlights, iris adjustments, and more. Check out the tutorial video below:

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Serious colorists don’t use a mouse; they use a much more capable hardware control surface based around three trackballs that control lift, gamma, and gain. These hardware devices are important because they give the colorist control over multiple push-pull adjustments at the same time. Such surfaces have traditionally run $25k or more, but Tangent Devices managed to get this triple-trackball interface down in price to $1,500 with their Wave Control Surface released last year. Now they’ve created a brilliant virtual version using the iPad’s multi-touch screen. Here’s a video of the interface in action, and instructions to get the free application: More »