» Posts Tagged ‘davinci’

Description image

DaVinci resolveWe got our first look at DaVinci Resolve 10 at NAB 2013, and at that moment it was clear that Resolve was taking aim at NLEs with the new “Edit” tab in the application. However, until version 10 was officially released, it was unclear just how the editing features of the program would function, and more importantly, whether or not they would allow Resolve to become a one-stop post production solution. In that first iteration, the editing features were solid, but not enough to unseat any NLEs. However, in version 10.1, Blackmagic has added a few new sophisticated editing features, as well as other enhancements. Read on to see what’s new. More »

Description image

DaVinci Resolve 10 Now ShippingBlackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve 10 finally entered public Beta back in September, and many of you have already begun using it for new projects. You can take version 9 projects into 10, but not the other way around, so starting something in 10 until today meant you were pushing forward with software that wasn’t quite complete yet (though stable for most uses). There is also some information that has been overlooked, and that’s related to the Lite version of the DaVinci Resolve color grading suite. More »

Description image

magic lantern raw davinci resolve 006_DR09Not too long ago, I posted about my post process for Magic Lantern RAW video, which relies heavily on Blackmagic Design’s DaVinci Resolve. This is in contrast to some Ginger HDR processes that allow you to stay completely in the Adobe realm, no proxies needed. Many would still like to employ Resolve in their color correction, however, since it’s a very powerful industry standard tool. One significant problem with the Magic Lantern/Resolve proposition was a type of ‘pink fringing’ artifacting that occurred in areas of high contrast. Now Magic Lantern-shooting Resolve users may rejoice: from the looks of things, the newly released(-ish) Davinci Resolve 10 fixes these fringing problems outright. More »

Description image

Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve 10 Public BetaBlackmagic announced DaVinci Resolve 10 at NAB 2013 just a year after introducing DaVinci Resolve 9, which has become one of the more popular color grading suites out there (with Resolve Lite being the best — and possibly only — free grading program). Resolve has become the go-to grading application for many productions, especially since Lite gives you almost all of the the features of the $1,000 version (Noise Reduction being one of the main differences). Resolve 9 still comes with the now $2,000 Blackmagic Cinema Camera 2.5K, but the company is giving all current and future owners a free upgrade to Resolve 10, which was officially released today during the IBC show. Check out some of the new features below. More »

Description image

5d 5d3 magic lantern ml raw offline online workflow bmd blackmagic design davinci resolve adobe premiere tutorial card

When I started playing around with Magic Lantern RAW video, two things came to mind: First, a camera called the “5D” was once again the nucleus of a low-budget cinematographic revolution — this time thanks to the Magic Lantern team; Second, how was I ever going to be able to edit what I’d shot? I’ve learned a lot since then, and it turns out an offline/online, proxy-based workflow is not only possible, but powerful. Check out the process that I’ve been using to round-trip Magic Lantern RAW between Adobe Premiere CC and DaVinci Resolve Lite below. More »

Description image

Blackmagic DaVinci ResolveNowadays, we equate ‘DaVinci’ with the powerful color correction software Resolve. It can be easy to forget DaVinci’s hardware-based origins, just as it can be easy to forget Media Composer’s origins as the dedicated machine editors used to call “The Avid.” Even in their software forms, these systems retain media matching abilities that were vital in the stand-alone NLE days — control of metadata. Resolve is no exception, even though we think of it primarily, even exclusively, as a grading tool. Scott Freeman, online editor of the USA series Suits and Covert Affairs, has recently taken the time to illustrate Resolve’s muscular metadata abilities. His workflow reminds us that such abilities are still quite useful today – when teaming up with Avid and otherwise. More »

Description image

Video thumbnail for vimeo video The Summer Blockbuster Colour Grading Tutorial - nofilmschoolIf you’ve seen a big tentpole movie release in the last 5 years, there’s a good chance the color grading has skewed heavily towards teal and orange. Countless movies have used this grading scheme for one simple reason: it works. The fact that only a handful of post houses handle final color correction and grading for most of the big Hollywood films probably factors into its popularity, but if you’d like to give your movie a bigger budget feel, check out this tutorial from Juan Melara below: More »

Description image

Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve 9.1.5 Magic Lantern SupportWhile there are some workflow solutions to get your Magic Lantern RAW files into the more video-friendly CinemaDNG format (like RAWMagic), Blackmagic has just released an update to DaVinci Resolve that gives support to the regular DNG files (both CinemaDNG and DNG use the .DNG file type). These files, created by applications like raw2dng, are slightly different than CinemaDNG, which is why they previously did not work in Resolve. With the newest 9.1.5 update, they will now drop right into the program after they’ve been converted from the .RAW format. Click through for a look at the rest of the changes in this update. More »

Description image

Ever asked yourself, “What in the f#$% is a LUT?!” Or what a LUT’s relationship is with color space? Or what a color space is? If “yes,” not to worry — these concepts can be fairly confusing. Fortunately, engineering can and will work for you as an artist, so long as your understanding of it covers the fundamentals. And even if you answered “no” to all the above, you should still check out some of outstanding basic-breakdowns of these concepts below — including how to convert CinemaDNG footage into the Academy Color Encoding Spec color space (ACES) in Davinci Resolve, plus how to use that very program to generate dailies (like a boss). More »

Description image

Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve 9 has seen a number of updates since its release over the summer, and even though many have been waiting for the full version that comes with their Blackmagic Cinema Camera, the free version, DaVinci Resolve Lite, is almost exactly the same , with just a few limitations in terms of nodes and resolutions. We’ve featured a few tutorials on the software so far, so if you’re unfamiliar with it, be sure to check them out. Click through for all of the additions in the new Resolve version 9.1. More »

Description image

With the Blackmagic Cinema Camera just on the horizon (sooner rather than later, hopefully), one of the big hurdles for many people is trying to understand the new RAW workflow with Cinema DNG files. Since the camera includes Blackmagic’s color grading suite, DaVinci Resolve 9, the RAW files can be brought into that program and then converted into something with a more manageable bitrate and color space for editing purposes. Colorist Dan Moran over at Philip Bloom’s blog takes a look at DaVinci, and gives a nice and simple tutorial to get you started working with and color grading RAW files. More »

Description image

This is a guest post by Cinematographer Ryan E. Walters.

As Moore’s Law continues to make technology more accessible to the masses, it is time to start exploring what it takes to build your own grading suite at home or in your office. Before reading the rest of this post, I recommend that you check out How To Get The Most Out Of CS6, DaVinci, & Your Mac Pro, as this article continues to build on what I’ve outlined. So let’s get started shall we? More »

Description image

While the Blackmagic Cinema Camera is a great value for the hardware contained within, there is another huge benefit to buying the camera: it comes free with Blackmagic’s powerful color correction/grading program DaVinci Resolve. While the newest version, DaVinci Resolve 9, was set to be released in July, it has been slightly delayed (along with the camera). Blackmagic has, however, released a beta version of the program which is free to download from their site. Alexis Van Hurkman, a writer/director/colorist who we’ve covered here in the past with his post-NAB Resolve 9 demo, takes a look at some of his favorite features that are new to version 9. More »

Description image

If you’ve been reading this site for the past few months, you know we’ve talked a tremendous amount about a little company called Blackmagic Design who happens to make a little camera called the Cinema Camera. There’s no question the specs are interesting, (and preorders are flying out the door) because there has never been a camera at the $3,000 price point that could give ProRes, DNxHD, and RAW all in one camera body. Not only that, but it happens to come free (that’s right, free) with a color correction/color grading program that used to cost about what you’d pay for a new car until Blackmagic took over the development. That program is called DaVinci Resolve 9, and if you’re curious about what the big deal is, and you’d like to get started with it before you get your Blackmagic Cinema Camera, check out the videos below. More »

Description image

Just because the popular color correction software DaVinci Resolve uses a Mac monitor for its press image (at left) doesn’t mean it’s Mac only — any more. Resolve, which has a free version known fittingly as Resolve Lite, now comes in a Windows version for the first time thanks a newly-released Public Beta. If you have already purchased Resolve for Mac, the Windows version comes included, so you now have a Windows license too. More »

Description image

In July DaVinci released a free version of their $1k color correction software, Resolve (also available with a $30k control panel). Now they’ve upgraded Resolve Lite, as the free version is known, to version 8.1, also removing the two node restriction and allowing for unlimited color correction nodes (nodes are similar to layers in After Effects, though they’re generally more flexible). There are a number of other updates as well (see the press release below), but to go along with the new release, there’s also a 15-minute video tutorial from Dan Kanes, who also did a recent free REDCINE-X Pro tutorial: More »

Description image

Ever since DaVinci released a free version of their $29,995 high-end Resolve color grading suite — and, more importantly, premiered a $995 software-only version — the color grading application has seen a drastic increase in accessibility. If you’re interested in learning how to use the program, which conveniently comes at a time when Apple has discontinued Color (which was itself the $25k program FinalTouch before Apple bought and then axed it), there’s a free 90-minute live webinar this Thursday September 8, 2011 at 10AM PDT (1PM EDT). Here’s a preview: More »