» Posts Tagged ‘footage’

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Amira BrazilLast week, after months upon months of waiting with our breath held, ARRI unveiled the pricing for its ENG-style documentary camera, the highly anticipated AMIRA. As was expected, the camera, which sports the same 16:9 sensor as some of its ALEXA brethren, is not an inexpensive one by any stretch of the imagination, with basic AMIRA packages starting in the neighborhood of $40,000. Even though the cameras are starting to make their way out into the wild, we still haven’t seen too many people put the AMIRA through its paces yet. Until now, that is. Filmmaker Jens Hoffman was recently given the chance to finish up his ALEXA-shot documentary MATA MATAwhich is about soccer culture and players in Brazil, on a brand new AMIRA, and the footage is breathtaking, to say the very least. More »

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Digital Bolex D16 Sensor

I shared my initial thoughts on the camera last week in Part 1, and since then I’ve been able to spend a little more time with the camera. The firmware I had when first shooting with it was slightly more beta than the firmware the camera currently has, but even in that time many more things have improved. I will elaborate on those in future posts, but for now I thought it would be a good idea to post some footage and talk about the image. With help from Adam and Dylan from Rule Boston Camera, we compared the D16 to the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera and the SI-2K Mini (which is in a housing known as Black Betty). Check out that test below, as well as some of the first footage we’ve shot near the bottom of the post. More »

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We heard last week that the Digital Bolex D16 was finally going to start shipping after a lengthy development period that saw the camera transform into a much more fully-featured tool (many of these transformations coming from future owner requests). The cameras are definitely shipping now, as we’ve got our own test camera that we’ll be reviewing very soon. But that’s not all, if you’ve been looking at grabbing one for yourself, pre-orders for new cameras are currently live over on the Digital Bolex site (along with a number of other goodies in the DB store). Click through for more on first impressions of the camera. More »

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Digital Bolex-Finished-Body-8285The first D16 cameras have been finished and are shipping to Kickstarter backers this week, but that doesn’t mean the folks at Digital Bolex are done. They are ramping up production beyond just crowdfunding backers, and will be opening up pre-sales for a new batch of 500 cameras starting Monday, December 16th, at 10AM. The good news doesn’t stop there, not only can you get in line, but you can also save $100 on that order with an exclusive No Film School discount code. More »

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Digital BolexThe Digital Bolex D16 camera was wildly successful when it launched on Kickstarter back in March 2012, blowing past its funding goal in just a matter of hours. It’s been a long development process with 100s of improvements made to the camera, and now it’s finally going to be in the hands of shooters within the next week. If you missed the Kickstarter, and you’d like to get your hands on one, they will officially be opening up pre-orders for the camera starting next week. Check below for more details. More »

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Digital Bolex D16 Finished BodyIt’s been a long and tough road for the team over at Digital Bolex, and while they would be the first to tell you that they would have loved for the product to be out and about already, nothing with camera design is easy or simple, and each project faces its own challenges and difficulties. Even RED, with their many millions of dollars spent on development of the DRAGON sensor, has only delivered a small number of finished cameras, most of which are not in the hands of regular users, but instead are being used on huge productions like Transformers and David Fincher’s new film Gone Girl. Either way, the D16 project is very, very close to completion, with locked calibration and firmware coming in the next few weeks. More »

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Video thumbnail for vimeo video Digital Bolex D16 Sensor Calibration Complete - nofilmschoolThe Digital Bolex has been making steady progress over the last few months, and we’ve seen a number of posts and test footage from pre-production versions of the camera. You may have heard of sensor calibration being talked about with the Blackmagic Production 4K camera, and that’s because it’s one of the most important parts of the camera development process. Even cameras that are shooting RAW — like the Digital Bolex D16 — must be calibrated so that they are getting the most out of the sensor and capturing information in the best possible way to get consistent and quality results in post. That process has now been completed, and the DB team is showing off some brand new footage. More »

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Michael Plescia Digital BolexIf it seems like we’ve been talking about the Digital Bolex a lot lately, it’s because we definitely have. A few months ago, it looked as if the release of the D16 was still quite a ways into the future. However, Joe, Elle, and the DB team have really pushed the process and gotten the beta version of the camera up and running. As a result, we’ve been seeing some promising test footage circulate for the past couple of weeks. Now, we’ve got even more to get excited about, as Michael Plescia, a professional filmmaker, has shot and graded some footage of his own and weighed in on the future of this camera. More »

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Digital Bolex footageWith the little bit of footage we’ve been able to see coming from the Digital Bolex, it’s only natural that we not only want to see more of it, but also maybe a few tests of a wider range of conditions to get a better feeling of what the camera can do. Well, the team over at Digital Bolex has released new footage that tests how the camera performs in sunlight, as well as with skin tones. Though not on the long side, these two tests surely demonstrate the capabilities of the D16. Check out the videos after the jump. More »

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Video thumbnail for vimeo video Digital Bolex Releases a Massive 10GB of RAW D16 Sample Footage for You to Play Around With - nofilmschoolWe got a little tease of the Digital Bolex D16 RAW camera earlier in the week, and some were quite concerned with the small amount of footage being released (though they were very clear that more was coming later in the week). That later in the week is here, and the team over at Digital Bolex is now releasing a massive amount of footage for you to play around with (around 10GB worth). Click through to watch the streaming samples first, and some behind the scenes. More »

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Sigma 18-35We’ve talked about Sigma’s new 18-35mm f/1.8 several times before here at nofilmschool. Since it was announced back at NAB in April, the lens has generated quite a bit of buzz (especially when the $800 price was revealed). Now that the 18-35 has been shipping for upwards of a month, and the community has had ample opportunity to test and review the lens, it seems clear that Sigma has hit a grand slam, especially for videographers and low-budget filmmakers. Check out some of the stellar reviews and footage from the 18-35 below. More »

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Digital Bolex FrameIt’s been quite a journey for the Digital Bolex team. There have been plenty of bumps along the way, and plenty of haters who said the Digital Bolex would never come to fruition. Well folks, we’ve finally got the first RAW 24fps footage from the prototype of the D16, and it’s clear that the finalized version of the Digital Bolex nearing its completion. Check out the original footage (and several graded variations) below: More »

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The Blender Foundation is constantly pushing the boundaries of availability, openness, and access to the raw materials it uses to create its ‘proof-of-Blender’ animated shorts. This type of access is usually more associated with open source software than filmmaking, but especially since the Project Mango live-action CGI/VFX-heavy  Tears of Steel was realized, that distinction has become increasingly blurred. Now filmmakers, animators, or compositors looking to cut their teeth on professional-grade material have access to the entirety of Tears of Steel‘s footage, in 4k OpenEXR (in the ACES color space), courtesy Xiph.org. In the meantime, the Foundation has also made available a number of resources concerning their post-production pipeline, which allowed them to transcode 4K Sony F65 footage to those Linux-workable OpenEXR frames. Check below for more details. More »

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Canon’s 4K video capable DSLR, the EOS-1D C, has marked an upset for the DSLR industry — and in more ways than one. Many feel that the addition of Motion-JPEG alone is not worth the camera’s $12K price point. This is particularly the case when weighing in controversial speculation that internally it’s mostly identical to its $7K 1080p sibling, the 1D X — and the fact that Canon is likely anticipating with gritted teeth the possibility of firmware hacks 4K-ifying the 1D X. That said, it could be a near-perfect blend of features depending on your application. If this is the case for you, but you want the chance to check out or grade some full-res video footage before pulling the trigger, you’re in luck — planet5D has just posted some downloadable 1D C 4K footage for your viewing consideration (assuming of course your machine can handle it). More »

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When Sony’s FS700 camera was first announced, it was rumored to be under $10k, with some folks pegging it at $8k.  When the European version’s price came out at roughly 8,000 euros (~$10,500) the promise of being under $10,000 transformed into “probably around $10,000″.  So what am I going on about?  Well, the price has finally been confirmed in the U.S., and it’s just as hoped for — $8,000 dollars for the camera body, or $8,600 with an E-mount zoom lens.  With this announcement, I figure it’s a nice moment to check out some more test videos shot with the camera that look at how well it handles whip pans, high contrast lighting, auto-focusing situations and more: More »

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When looking at cameras, it’s easy to get caught up in the numbers game — is the footage 4:4:4; how many stops of latitude does it have; will it output raw?  These features and numbers are important, but it’s easy to forget what they mean, and how they actually impact your footage.  It doesn’t help that it can be hard to get your hands on original files with full shooting details, instead of compressed internet versions that may have been corrected three ways till Sunday.  With this in mind, Gaal Laszlo has put up an informative and interesting guide to the Canon C300 that aims to show just how the numbers play out in actual footage — he has included original files for download and comparison, along with a great and detailed explanation: More »

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Plenty of people have asked about the wisdom behind ordering a camera sight unseen. But the RED SCARLET-X is essentially the same camera as the existing RED EPIC, with the APS-C sensor crop of a RED ONE (virtually the same as a Canon 7D) instead of the larger APS-H size of the 5K EPIC. Still, there’s been a clamor to see the first RED SCARLET-X footage, and Tonaci Tran has just done the honors. Here are the first two three clips: More »