» Posts Tagged ‘hdr’

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I’m as captivated by striking portrayals of urban nightscapes as anyone, ranging back to the existing-light-only Nocturne, to the aerial ghost-eye-views of FIREFLY. There’s just something breathtaking about seeing the biggest centers of life and activity during the desolate, slumbering hours. Filmmaker Colby Moore has added another quieting noct-urban document to the list. City In The World lays some high dynamic range RED EPIC sights on the city that never quite gets to sleep. Check out some of New York City’s dark side below, plus some details from Colby about his non-HDRx workflow. More »

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As we approach midnight in most places around the world (with some already celebrating the new year), the hardworking team over at Magic Lantern has delivered more updates to the trusty Canon DSLRs. We now have a second alpha for the Canon 7D — a camera that we previously thought was unhackable — and more updates are on their way with support for the Canon T4i, 6D, and 40D. Check out all of the exciting developments below. More »

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Magic Lantern, the well-known third party firmware solution for Canon DSLRs that we discussed a few weeks ago, has finally released their newest firmware version 2.3 as a free download. Since it takes a tremendous amount of work to put together these firmware updates, they were asking for a donation in exchange for the download, or you could compile the firmware update yourself for free (which isn’t very straightforward). Check out the video below to see some of the great features that have been added in this version. More »

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Magic Lantern, the hack third party firmware solution for Canon cameras, has come a long, long way since its first release. Stability and new features have been the top priorities for the team, and it looks like with the newest release they are delivering on both counts. Even though Canon has been increasing the feature set of the higher-end cameras like the Canon 5D Mark III and the 1D X, they have been trying to differentiate the video and photo product lines as much as possible. For those familiar with the traditional features of a video camera, using DSLR presents quite a few challenges. The goal of Magic Lantern, however, is to introduce in firmware all of these quirks that make shooting with real video cameras that much easier. More »

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Is real-time High Dynamic Range imaging, ala RED’s HDRx, coming to Canon DSLRs with the next version of Magic Lantern firmware? Well, yes and no — thus the asterisk. The system they’ve developed splits a 24p stream into two 12FPS exposures, one high and one low, and then interpolates the frames. It’s an interesting hack, demonstrated here: More »

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In the High Dynamic Range imaging arena, it looks like RED’s HDRx mode just got some competition. But while RED’s technology cleverly combines two different exposures taken with the same sensor (fractions of a second apart), newcomer AMP uses a beam splitter to divvy up incoming light onto three separate sensors. We’ve seen beam-splitting HDR before, but this is a single unit that currently claims 17.5 stops of exposure, with up to 20 being claimed for the production unit. However, while the demo video says it “reveals reality,” in fact tasteless HDR can render reality into a garish mishmash: More »

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I just got through watching Doug Liman’s Fair Game, and was impressed with how the film dealt with the Valerie Plame affair without dumbing it down — it was a refreshingly “adult” Hollywood feature. However, what I wasn’t impressed with was the RED cinematography, with Liman himself serving as DP. It looked fine, but it didn’t look great, to my eye. In camera tests to date we’ve seen that the RED has plenty of shadow detail but lacks the highlight details of film, and it’s the slightly blown-out look of skin tones and other highlights that has has me “meh”-ing some RED cinematography. Enter RED’s game-changing exposure hack, HDRx. The following video was posted to the Cinematography Mailing List a while ago, but it’s a great explanation of HDRx in action on the RED EPIC, and also offers a glimpse of Assimilate’s post-production software SCRATCH at work: More »

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For those unfamiliar with RED camera-native files, a common first reaction to ungraded footage is “this looks really flat.” Indeed, that is exactly the point: by capturing as much visual information as possible, the camera gives the colorist the most flexibility in post to push the image toward a desired look. Now, with a new mode called HDRx, RED has found a way to conjoin two adjacent exposures in order to give rise to a real-time High Dynamic Range moving image. So in terms of dynamic range, what’s one of the hardest shots for a camera to expose? Quite possibly a dark interior with a bright sunny day outside. To prove the mettle of their HDRx mode, RED released the following clip: More »

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Dynamic Perception has some interesting-looking micro-dolly/controller combos for sale, and they’ve demonstrated how to create moving, time-lapse, HDR videos using auto exposure bracketing on a Pentax K7. It’s not something you’ll need to do everyday, but if you ever need to create this very specialized shot, here’s how. More »

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With the new RED cameras featuring a built-in HDR mode, and with some shooters using a beam splitter to capture HDR images on two DSLRs, High Dynamic Range imaging seems all the rage these days. But what about the rest of us, who only have one DSLR? We can use After Effects to combine two shots with differing exposure settings. Here, Robin Schmidt shares a tutorial on how to do so: More »

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Real-time High Dynamic Range imaging is coming soon to high-end motion picture cameras, and will likely change a lot about how moving images are captured and seen. In the layman’s hands the process is typically reserved for still images because combining two moving images in post is nigh impossible. But Soviet Montage Productions took two Canon 5D Mark IIs and cleverly used a beam splitter to feed each DSLR the exact same image. The resulting 1:30 clip is exactly the kind of camera demonstration that people love to Twitter about, whether the demo is significant or not. But here’s the thing about this clip (particularly the first shot): it’s gorgeous. More »