» Posts Tagged ‘hdslr’

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Nikon D810 FrontEven though Nikon was the first DSLR out of the gate with 24p video, it was Canon that really made a splash with the Mark II not long after. Nikon tried to get back some of that market with the D800 and D4 aimed at video shooters, and now they are pushing even harder with the new D810, which adds 1080p 60fps, higher ISO capabilities, and simultaneous recording to both internal cards and an external recorder. While there is a big push to add 4K recording to these kinds of cameras, neither the newer D4s nor the new D810 have it. More »

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Nikon D4S Front LensTwo years ago Nikon announced the D4, which finally took video offerings from the company to the next level. While their D800 actually proved to have better video quality, the move at least showed that Nikon was serious about providing quality that rivaled Canon. First soft-launched at CES back in January, the new D4S builds all of the things the D4 got right, and gives us video people some additional features, like 60fps at 1080p and a mind-melting 409,600 max ISO — as well as the ability to adjust audio levels while recording. More »

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Nikon-D4s-CES-2Nikon took a huge step forward in video quality with the release of the D800, but their flagship D4 was a bit disappointing in that department (even though it did have better low-light capabilities). With Canon pushing into the 4K DSLR space with cameras like the 1D C, and Panasonic including 4K in its next GH camera, it’s really only a matter of time before Nikon jumps into the ring. Click through for more on a possible 4K future for Nikon. More »

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Nikon D3300 with Lens AngleNikon has replaced their entry-level DSLR once again, and while the previous D3200 and the new D3300 are very similar, there are a couple major differences: they’ve removed the anti-aliasing filter, and they’ve added 1080p 60fps. That makes the D3300 Nikon’s second DSLR with 1080/60 — the first being the D5300 which was introduced in October. We’ve also got word that Nikon is going to be introducing a new flagship camera, the D4s, and they’ve been showing it off at CES, with an eventual release in 2014. More »

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Nikon D5300 FrontNikon has been slowly improving the video quality on its entry and mid-range APS-C DSLRs, after beating everyone to the punch with the D90 back in 2008. While that camera was limited to 720p and a very low bit rate, we’ve now finally got full 1080p at 60fps in an affordable Nikon camera, which means real slow motion when played back at 24fps or 30fps. The D5200 rarely suffered from moire and aliasing thanks, in part, to a brand new sensor made by Toshiba that was better suited for video. The D5300 may have a slightly improved version of the same sensor with the low pass filter removed (or maybe a brand new one), but video quality should be similar. Check out more of the new features below. More »

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Nikon D610_3It has been about a year since Nikon released their full frame Nikon D600, which at the time was the cheapest full-frame camera at just around $2,000 for the body. However, the D600 wasn’t without its faults, as there were many complaints from users about dust and oil residue on the sensor. Well, with the recently announced D610, Nikon has apparently addressed this issue with an all new shutter mechanism, as well as a few other upgraded specifications, like better image quality, higher fps rate, and improved automatic white balance. Read on for more details, as well as pricing for both the new D610 and the D600. More »

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Canon announced all the way back in October 2012 that they had worked out what we had previously thought impossible: uncompressed HDMI (which really just involves making the output fill the screen and removing overlays). While it’s not necessarily going to be a magic bullet for better image quality, there are plenty of uses for clean HDMI, including better workflow options. Unfortunately for those who were looking at the beginning of the month for the firmware update, Canon has now pushed it all the way until the end of this month. Click through for more. More »

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Many were hopeful that Canon was going to rid all of their DSLRs of moire and aliasing, but they’ve saved those improvements to all but their most expensive cameras. The full-frame Canon 6D, which was announced back in September, is about a $1,000 cheaper than the Mark III, but unfortunately suffers from aliasing and moire (something that is absent from the Mark III’s image). Mosaic Engineering has been developing anti-aliasing filters for Canon and Nikon DSLRs, and they’ve finally come out with one for the Canon 6D, the VAF-6D. Could the new filter make it the perfect full-frame camera in terms of price/performance in Canon’s lineup? Check out the first sample video below. More »

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As we approach midnight in most places around the world (with some already celebrating the new year), the hardworking team over at Magic Lantern has delivered more updates to the trusty Canon DSLRs. We now have a second alpha for the Canon 7D — a camera that we previously thought was unhackable — and more updates are on their way with support for the Canon T4i, 6D, and 40D. Check out all of the exciting developments below. More »

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You’ve seen the test videos and the first short film made with the prototype models, but now the production models of the Panasonic GH3 have been around for almost a month. Those filmmakers who decided to take the early adoption plunge have been out there kicking the GH3‘s figurative tires and uploading their resulting videos. Here I’ve picked out those videos that should answer lingering questions about moire, ISO, the wireless app, overall image quality, and how the GH3 compares to the GH2 (and popular DSLR’s). I’ll also chime in occasionally with my thoughts on the brief hands-on experience I had with the camera: More »

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There are a good deal of relatively inexpensive rigs out there that can help you achieve a nice dolly shot. For small-scale dollying you might use Cineskates, or for shots that require a greater amount of movement with larger subjects, you might go with Rigwheels. But there might be times when the size of your subject might make these tools — and even a full dolly track setup — inadequate for the job. But with a DSLR, some planning, and a little post work, you can put together a beautiful dolly shot of a tall building: More »

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If you’re looking for a new full-frame camera from Canon, you’ve got some options now that the new Canon 6D is beginning to ship. We’ve already seen some samples from that camera, but it’s hard to know how it compares to the other models without looking at all of them directly. Mitch from planet5D has gotten a hold of the Mark II, Mark III, and 6D simultaneously to see if the new model still exhibits some of the same issues that the Canon 5D Mark III has fixed. More »

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Some of us have been waiting for this since the camera stat rumors in September, and others since the GH2 was hacked. Despite earlier news of a slightly delayed release date, it looks like Panasonic has officially begun shipping the GH3. If you’re just now learning about the GH3, be sure to check out the camera’s stats and past videos. However, if you’ve been following the news, jump in and check out the latest test videos: More »

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With all of the recent camera announcements, it’s easy to forget that Canon introduced a new budget full-frame camera, the Canon 6D. While it doesn’t sport all of the features of the 5D Mark III, it should be a step up from the aging 5D Mark II (which hasn’t come down in price very much thanks to Canon’s new minimum pricing agreement with resellers). Johnnie Behiri, who often tests out the latest and greatest cameras, took a pre-production Canon 6D for a spin and gives us his thoughts and some footage below. More »

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The team over at Magic Lantern continues to make things happen. The camera has barely been released and they’ve already gotten inside the firmware for the Canon EOS-M mirrorless camera (which shares a similar sensor with the Canon T4i). A firmware update is still a little ways off, but it’s another good sign that most (if not all) Canon cameras can be hacked with a little bit of work. Also of note, Magic Lantern has released the 3rd Alpha for the 5D Mark III, which addresses a few issues from the last Alpha. More »

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Learning to shoot timelapse videos on a DSLR can be quite daunting at first, but Preston Kanak, a frequent contributor to Philip Bloom’s site, has already produced a couple great videos giving an introduction to shooting timelapse on DSLRs. His ultimate goal is to create a series of videos and release one each month that details a bit about producing a timelapse video and what exactly goes into the process. If you happened to miss either the introduction or part 1, or you want to skip right ahead to part 2, click through to check them out. More »

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Nikon introduced the D600 back in September, shortly after Sony gave us a number of new cameras. In terms of full-frame DSLRs, only the aging 5D Mark II and the new Canon 6D are anywhere near the price range of the $2,100 D600. Unfortunately, Nikon released the camera without the ability to change the aperture in live view. While this isn’t a deal-breaker for those with manual lenses, if you want to use new automatic lenses, it’s a real problem. Another issue for filmmakers is that the camera does not display a full picture in live view in order to make full use of recording the HDMI output. A new firmware update, however, may fix these issues and make the D600 a contender. More »

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People have done as much as possible to argue against the test that was performed with the Blackmagic Cinema Camera by Marco Solorio and OneRiver Media. That test compared the 5D Mark III and the BMCC, and even though the superior resolution and dynamic range of one of those cameras should have been obvious, many still prefer the Mark III and complained that a better picture profile or some post sharpness would make the differences less noticeable. Well, Marco is back with a new test, and (in my personal opinion) it’s hard to argue against these results, as he’s pulled out all of the stops to really test the Blackmagic Cinema Camera and show why 8-bit will always be 8-bit, and what it means when you’ve got the capability for 12-bit images. More »

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That’s right, Canon is going to be giving users clean HDMI in a future firmware update for the 5D Mark III, and it’s not coming from the hardworking folks at Magic Lantern. Canon has innovated in some ways in the DSLR space, but they have made a clear distinction between their video and photography product lines. Lack of clean HDMI is a feature their competition already has — namely Nikon and Sony, who both have cameras with clean HDMI — with the Nikon D800 being the first full-frame camera out of the gate with a fully uncompressed 1080p. Obviously Canon has a plan for announcing this now, the only question is, when will you actually be able to get it? More »

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The first alpha for Magic Lantern on the Canon 5D Mark III added quite a few of the basic functions that were released in the major 2.3 release. The second alpha has just been released, and it brings some interesting features, including clean HDMI, a High Dynamic Range (HDR) mode in video, and gradual exposure, which allows the camera to slowly ramp up to the selected exposure settings, rather than abruptly changing them. Check below for the rest of the details. More »