January 9, 2014

Nikon Gives 1080P 60FPS to the New D3300 DSLR & Quietly Shows Off the High-End D4S

Nikon has replaced their entry-level DSLR once again, and while the previous D3200 and the new D3300 are very similar, there are a couple major differences: they've removed the anti-aliasing filter, and they've added 1080p 60fps. That makes the D3300 Nikon's second DSLR with 1080/60 -- the first being the D5300 which was introduced in October. We've also got word that Nikon is going to be introducing a new flagship camera, the D4s, and they've been showing it off at CES, with an eventual release in 2014.

Nikon D3300

The product overview from Nikon:

Here's a first look at the camera from What Digtial Camera:

Specs of the D3300:

  • 24.2 Mp DX-Format (APS-C) CMOS Sensor
  • EXPEED 4 Processor
  • 1920 x 1080: 60 fps, 50 fps, 30 fps, 25 fps, 24 fps (Record 20 minutes of 60fps)
  • 1280 x 720: 60 fps, 50 fps
  • 640 x 424: 30 fps, 25 fps
  • No Optical Low-Pass Filter
  • 3.0" 921k-Dot LCD Monitor
  • SD, SDHC, SDXC Memory Cards
  • 11-Point Multi-CAM 1000 AF Sensor
  • ISO 100-12800 (High Sensitivity Mode: 100-25600)
  • Microphone Port
  • 5 fps Shooting
  • Availability: February 2014
  • Price: $650 with 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G Lens

While these videos are from the D3200 and NOT from the new D3300, the image quality should be relatively similar between the cameras, so these samples can give you an idea of what you'd be looking at when the new camera comes out:

The lack of anti-aliasing filter may make for sharper photos in certain instances, and though it may seem detrimental on the surface for video, there might not be much of a difference in the end, as we saw with the Nikon D800E. The EXPEED 4 processor should improve quality for both stills and videos over the EXPEED 3 in the D3200, but we won't know how much better it will be until the cameras start hitting the street. The D3300 only comes with this new kit lens, but at $650, it's not a huge investment as a first DSLR if you're just getting into video, and could be a good second or third camera if you'd like to have something with 60fps for slow motion.

Nikon D4s

Nikon also showed off its new high-end camera, the D4s, at CES, but they didn't reveal much about the new camera except for the fact that it will have a new sensor (though we now also know that it will use the same memory cards, one QXD and one CF slot). This is what they said in a press release earlier in the week:

As Nikon's new flagship model, the D4S will offer advances over the Nikon D4 HD-SLR camera, including enhanced image quality enabled with adoption of a new image-processing engine. The new HD-SLR will also feature more advanced autofocusing performance, further solidifying it as the choice for professional sports, nature and event photographers as well as photojournalists.

Here is  with a look at the camera from CES:

It's been said that this will be a minor update, but hopefully video quality will be improved on the new D4s. The old D4 was actually worse than the D800 when it came to sharpness, so we'll see what Nikon does with the new version. I would be very surprised if they did anything like 4K on the new camera, but you'd have to think that if the company was going to experiment with higher resolutions, that's probably the model that makes the most sense. If Nikon included some more video options on the camera (including 4K), and kept stills as good as they are now, it could bring some people away from cameras like the 1D C. This probably isn't likely, but as I've said many times, Nikon has no higher end video products to protect, so they are in a unique position.

We'll likely hear more about the D4s in the coming months.

What would you think about a D4s with 4K video like the 1D C for half the price?

Links:

Your Comment

40 Comments

All their entry level Nikons so far have the issue with not being able to change the aperture in Live View. Is this one any different?

January 9, 2014 at 9:54PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

5
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moebius22

I HOPE THEY'RE LISTENING!!

January 9, 2014 at 10:19PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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WILL

I thought I had read that that is a problem with all the Nikon models? Also that it had something to do with the hack that they had to do back in the day to add auto-focus to the same traditional mount that they had been using (as opposed to Canon ditching their old mount completely), which supposedly prevents the aperture from being set on an electronic lens while the mirror is locked down (i.e. in live view mode)? I don't have a Nikon, but can anyone confirm?

January 9, 2014 at 11:54PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Shenan

It's a physical design issue that software can't fix. I think the higher model cameras don't have the issue.

January 10, 2014 at 12:07AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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moebius22

Not all the Nikon models. It's not there on the Nikon D800. Unfortunately I think this is the same on this camera, since the issue is there on D5300 as well.

January 10, 2014 at 4:54AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

1
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Good to know. Thanks both.

January 10, 2014 at 11:13AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Shenan

I admit the aperture control on Nikon DSLRs is strange, that is one of the reasons I found shooting video with Nikon 1 V1 more joyful experience.

But please understand this "limitation" applies to lenses without aperture ring (G line). When you take your time and search for lenses with aperture ring (such as Nikon 50mm f1.8 D AF, Nikon 55mm f2.8 - just to give example), you can control both focus and aperture via rings on the lenses - does not depend on LiveView.

If you are not afraid to experiment with reductions, you can even get smooth (step-less) aperture control with glass like Jupiter 50mm f2.

January 11, 2014 at 5:45AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Nor can you change the ISO in video mode- it is ALWAYS automatic!

The camera would be a big-boy camera if only it allowed the user to select his/her own ISO. Until then, Nikon won't sell as many cameras as Canon.

January 10, 2014 at 12:55PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Doug

Is this information correct? I am pretty sure I could chamge ISO on the older d3200 when I used it. It was just the aperture I had to leave liveview to change.

January 13, 2014 at 9:53AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Ebrahim Saadawi

This is not true in the d800. As far as entry level cams, I'm pretty sure the 5300 doesn't have this problem, I doubt the 3300 will.

January 13, 2014 at 10:13AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Lcky

This is 100% NOT true. All models have user control of ISO. Auto ISO is set as the default, and needs to be changed, but it can be manually controlled.

January 17, 2014 at 9:50AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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steve

Canon, are you listening?

January 9, 2014 at 9:56PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Ty

Ssshhh don't say anything apparently people like spending 5k on cameras that don't even shoot 60fp, and if you say something they'd eat you alive.

January 9, 2014 at 10:14PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Edry

Hahaha, +1

January 9, 2014 at 11:53PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Maxim Drygin

lol

January 10, 2014 at 1:00AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gene

60p isn't all that important.

January 10, 2014 at 6:03PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Jake

Obviously not to people buying C100's or C300's

January 11, 2014 at 2:52AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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I HOPE THEY’RE LISTENING!!

January 9, 2014 at 10:19PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

1
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WILL

IMO, they'll put 4K into D800 and keep D4 primarily for photographers. But they just might release other "in-between" models between now and Photokina.
.
D3300 is arguably their answer to Sony's NEX 5N/A5000 that dominates the Japanese own market. Thus, the collapsible lens for a smaller imprint.

January 9, 2014 at 10:00PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DLD

Nikon released the DF for people who want a more " traditional" still camera. It would be ridiculous for them to not have video features into their next gen modules--especially the D4.

January 10, 2014 at 1:00PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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2clock

I didn't mean they'd go away with video entirely on D4S. In fact, it may be improved, as they claim. I just don't think it'll be made into 1D C because that is just not Nikon's market. On the other hand, D800 could easily get a 4K feature at about $3K. A 33 megapixel sensor is basically 4K x 4 and these pixel groups can provide a superb 4K video. It remains to be seen what happens with the D7100 and D610 upgrades/updates. Both can be made by more video friendly.

January 10, 2014 at 3:16PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DLD

As an ex-D800 owner I shrug, sadly. The D800 is still one of the best cameras I've ever used, bar none.
And just imagine for a moment what MagicLantern could do with that QXD slot in the D4.
Ah well.

January 9, 2014 at 11:47PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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marklondon

Hey Joe!

SAMSUNG also released a new camera. The NX30 smart camera. It has a mic jack, does 60p and has a pretty cool tilting viewfinder. Maybe some of your readers might be interested in one. $999.99 with kit lens.

CHECK OUT the specs here. http://www.dpreview.com/previews/samsung-nx30

VIDEO SAMPLES: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXEQIC4Qkmw

January 9, 2014 at 11:57PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Ramaatis

I've been investigating the sensor specs of the D3300 and I am kinda starting to suspect that maybe it has the same sensor as the D5200/D7100/D5300, which have proven themselves to be exceptionally AWESOME performers!

I hope so, if so this Nikon D3300 will be a rockstar and the King of all entry level cameras for filming with.

Plus don't discount how much better having the new Exceed processor will impact the D3300's video performance, it mean the D5300 got a step up from the D5200's performance, and I expect the same when comparing the D3300 vs D3200. As both the D5300 and the D3300 have the new exceed processor.

January 10, 2014 at 3:51AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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The d5300 got rid of banding and added 60p option. Its the first DSLR to my knowledge that image quality-wise does not suffer from any real issues in HD-delivery. Also, HDMI-out offers pro-res 220mbit/s.

January 10, 2014 at 1:59PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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stoke

David, it would have to be cheaper than a Pana G6 to earn that title.
At this moment, that is the best entry level camera to film with.

January 10, 2014 at 5:54AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Pascal Garnier

In terms of sharpness you are right, but with the nikons have the ability to use custom pictures profiles and therefore access to a must higher dynamic range. So depending on the situation I think both are incredible value :) (if the d3300 match the quality of the d5300 of course)

January 10, 2014 at 9:16AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Heldico

I totally agree that the Panasonic G6 is the current best camera (with the Nikon D5200 coming a close second).

But you can't compare their prices after they've been out a while vs the only just announced RRP of the D3300, give it a few months and it will come out even cheaper :-)

January 10, 2014 at 9:47AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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nice camera, i dont know why, but im starting to hate Canon!

January 10, 2014 at 8:27AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Nelson

U prolly never had one....haters do this a lot...talk about something they never owned

January 10, 2014 at 2:40PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Kendrick

I don't get what you're saying. He never owned a Canon?
Video on Nikon trumps canon. This coming from a 7D/5D2/5d3 and D800 owner.

Canons best video dslr is the 7D.

January 11, 2014 at 5:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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VinceGortho

I'm actually looking for a camera that does sharp 1080/60p because my BMCC doesn't and the footage looks shockingly different than the 720/60p from my 7D. My issue though, is that I own all EF glass so I don't think this Nikon will work for me. I guess the GH3 would be my best option because it's easier to adapt to...

January 10, 2014 at 12:54PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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I've found the GH3 blends pretty well (with a little color tweaking, of course) with the BMCC and BMPCC. I've used this combo a few times and it gets the job done.

January 10, 2014 at 2:01PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Pretty sharp 1080/60p, no moire and 12 stops of dynamic range in an very small and light 650$ body that will take all the good vintage glass from nikon without any hassle and records in a format that can be edited straight away at around 38Mbit/s.

January 10, 2014 at 1:55PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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stoke

hey, stoke, so the D3300 should take the old manual-focus Nikkor f-mount glass? meaning that in manual mode, shooting video, you would be able to choose your own shutter speed, aperture with the manual lens, AND THE ISO? In a post above, doug says the ISO is always automatic in video mode.

January 11, 2014 at 9:52PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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jimbee

BTW, next month there's a major photo/cam show in Japan and the winter Olympics. It's expected that several new cameras will be unveiled at either or both events.

January 10, 2014 at 3:21PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DLD

oooooor you could just get a Sony camera where everything since the NEX 5n has had 1080p60 for years

January 11, 2014 at 7:18AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Canon or Nikon listening? Lol they just dont care!

January 11, 2014 at 8:56AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Kuk

Another camera that gets the anti-aliasing filter disabled. (can't recall the other DSLR that I recently read about doing this)

Can somebody give me any logic for the technical rationale on this? I thought that was a good thing for these DSLRs, when shooting video.

Thanks

wsmith

January 16, 2014 at 5:01PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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wsmith

They say the new sensors don't need it but a better guess is that the new processors (aka video engines) are powerful enough to correct the errors with the repeating patterns that used to produce moire in the previous generation cameras. The software has also probably been adjusted to take advantage of the more power on hand. And, if you are stuck with moire, you can always add a decent OLPF like the type made by Mosaic. At least, in that scenario, you can put it in or take it out as the situation warrants. Meanwhile, the units are both sharper and more affordable for the quality they possess (Mosaic OLPF run into the mid $300's).

January 16, 2014 at 5:19PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DLD