» Posts Tagged ‘nikon’

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Nikon 1 V3 Front with LensNikon chose a very different route with its interchangeable lens mirrorless offering, picking a sensor smaller than Micro 4/3 but slightly bigger than Super 16mm. While they have been slowly building up a line of new lenses, using lenses made for larger sensors means a significant crop factor, something that has likely hindered its acceptance (unless the crop factor is a benefit to you — like if you’re trying to shoot sports). The new V3 adds 120fps at 720p and 60fps at 1080p, but unfortunately it looks like there will still not be any 24fps. You may, however, be able to get some interesting clips using the 5K burst mode. More »

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Nikon D4S Front LensTwo years ago Nikon announced the D4, which finally took video offerings from the company to the next level. While their D800 actually proved to have better video quality, the move at least showed that Nikon was serious about providing quality that rivaled Canon. First soft-launched at CES back in January, the new D4S builds all of the things the D4 got right, and gives us video people some additional features, like 60fps at 1080p and a mind-melting 409,600 max ISO — as well as the ability to adjust audio levels while recording. More »

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Nikon-D4s-CES-2Nikon took a huge step forward in video quality with the release of the D800, but their flagship D4 was a bit disappointing in that department (even though it did have better low-light capabilities). With Canon pushing into the 4K DSLR space with cameras like the 1D C, and Panasonic including 4K in its next GH camera, it’s really only a matter of time before Nikon jumps into the ring. Click through for more on a possible 4K future for Nikon. More »

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Nikon D3300 with Lens AngleNikon has replaced their entry-level DSLR once again, and while the previous D3200 and the new D3300 are very similar, there are a couple major differences: they’ve removed the anti-aliasing filter, and they’ve added 1080p 60fps. That makes the D3300 Nikon’s second DSLR with 1080/60 — the first being the D5300 which was introduced in October. We’ve also got word that Nikon is going to be introducing a new flagship camera, the D4s, and they’ve been showing it off at CES, with an eventual release in 2014. More »

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Metabones_spnfg-bmpcc-bm1_03sThis year a company called Metabones released the Speed Booster, an adapter which makes lenses faster, wider, and sharper as long as they were designed for a larger format than the format you’re currently working with. They already introduced adapters for Micro 4/3 cameras like the GH3, but now they’ve created new Nikon mount Speed Boosters designed specifically for the Blackmagic Cinema Camera and Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera that make lenses on those bodies even faster and wider, and give the Super 16mm Pocket essentially a Super 35mm sensor. More »

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Nikon D5300 FrontNikon has been slowly improving the video quality on its entry and mid-range APS-C DSLRs, after beating everyone to the punch with the D90 back in 2008. While that camera was limited to 720p and a very low bit rate, we’ve now finally got full 1080p at 60fps in an affordable Nikon camera, which means real slow motion when played back at 24fps or 30fps. The D5200 rarely suffered from moire and aliasing thanks, in part, to a brand new sensor made by Toshiba that was better suited for video. The D5300 may have a slightly improved version of the same sensor with the low pass filter removed (or maybe a brand new one), but video quality should be similar. Check out more of the new features below. More »

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Nikon D610_3It has been about a year since Nikon released their full frame Nikon D600, which at the time was the cheapest full-frame camera at just around $2,000 for the body. However, the D600 wasn’t without its faults, as there were many complaints from users about dust and oil residue on the sensor. Well, with the recently announced D610, Nikon has apparently addressed this issue with an all new shutter mechanism, as well as a few other upgraded specifications, like better image quality, higher fps rate, and improved automatic white balance. Read on for more details, as well as pricing for both the new D610 and the D600. More »

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Nikon Removable Heat StorageIf you’ve ever been on a long shoot, then maybe you have experienced an overheating camera, and if so, then you know the frustration of waiting until it cools. Nikon aims to solve this issue. Nikon has a patent pending on a removable heat storage unit for DSLR cameras that absorbs the heat produced by the sensor. In the same way you might interchange batteries or memory cards, Nikon’s removable heat storage will allow you to switch one out for another, allowing one to cool and keeping your longer shoots on schedule. For some more info and schematics, hit the jump. More »

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Nikon Metabones Speed BoosterIf you’ve been living under a rock for the past few months, you may not have heard all the buzz about this amazing adapter called the Speed Booster that can actually make lenses faster, sharper, and wider. How does it does this exactly? Focal reducers, as they are called, have been around forever, but as long as you’ve got a big enough piece of glass, it basically works like moving a projector closer to a screen. Things get smaller, but they also get sharper. The Canon Speed Booster for NEX has been available for some time, but if you are more comfortable with a native mount attaching to your NEX E-Mount, or you’d like a Micro 4/3 mount version, and you needed to be able to control Nikon G series lenses (the ones without a manual aperture ring), Metabones now has a solution for you with the new Nikon Speed Booster. More »

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Nikon D7000 Silent RAW Hack - Simeon PilgrimWe’ve heard a lot about RAW video on Canon DSLRs using Magic Lantern, but could it be possible with other cameras? Theoretically, yes. In order for DSLRs and Mirrorless cameras to create a Live View image, they have to take the RAW feed from the sensor, debayer it, and then downscale it for the display and recording. Nikon’s DSLRs have had hacks for some time, but progress has been slow, probably because of their lackluster video offerings until recently and the much smaller community. With a recent discovery from Simeon Pilgrim, we may be one step closer to RAW video on some Nikon cameras. More »

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The Nikon D600 is currently the only full-frame camera in its price range to offer uncompressed HDMI, but a huge issue prevented it from being usable — that is, until now. Nikon has just released a firmware update that corrects the HDMI output, and instead of only filling 95% of the screen, it will now fill 100%. While many were hopeful the update would also include a fix for the ability to change the aperture in live view, that doesn’t seem to be the case. Nikon also released updates for the Nikon D800 and a number of other cameras, so click through for more details and links to the downloads. More »

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Nikon might have been first out of the gate with the D90, but it wasn’t until cameras like the D7000 that their DSLRs started outputting 1080p, and early last year, they beat everyone to the punch by introducing the D800, the first full-frame DSLR with an uncompressed 1080p 4:2:2 HDMI output for better quality. Now they’ve got a new DSLR, the D7100, which takes most of the features of the D5200, like the APS-C 24MP Toshiba sensor and uncompressed HDMI, and puts it into a more professional and weather-resistant body. The D5200 also does something basically no other APS-C camera in the price range does: it can shoot video that is practically free from aliasing and moire. The D7100, however, has its optical low pass filter removed, so will that mean worse video on the new DSLR? More »

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It sounds like hyperbole, but it’s not. For a limited time, you can get Canon and Nikon lenses from B&H Photo Video at record-breakingly low prices. It may be a bit soon to call it the ‘sale of the century,’ but B&H is now offering up to $350 in savings on Nikon lenses, and as much as $300-$400 in savings on Canon lenses and flashes due to manufacturer-mandated discounts. So what are you waiting for? Read on for the links below. More »

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When considering lens options for purchase or rental, certain criteria may stand out to you more than others. This depends on what you shoot most often, or what a project demands. Perhaps as a run-and-gun doc shooter, you simply need the extra stop you get with one 85mm lens for the same price as another that doesn’t vignette as badly. Or you gave up a contrast performance you really preferred in favor of the IS lens of greater overall value. But what if money were no object, and focal length and speed were matched? An aspect you’d find yourself evaluating closely is the way each handles its bokeh, or de-focused areas of the image. DigitalRev’s latest Battle of the Bokeh is a comparison between Canon, Nikon, and Sigma 35mm f/1.4 lenses in precisely this spirit — with some unexpected results. More »

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Not all glass is created equal. Some is shaped into things you drink out of. Some becomes windows, windshields, and portholes. And some become the tools you use every day to create beautiful images. Something as insanely resolute as 4K (or even 8K) broadcast and stereoscopic 48fps can only look so good with a junk piece of glass placed between the medium and the image — which can also work great if that’s the type of look you’re going for. Given all this, the birds and the bees of how lenses are made — and function, down to the basics — is definitely something many of us take for granted. More »

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Canon obviously got off to an early start in Hollywood thanks to the incredible performance of the Canon 5D Mark II and the fact that the camera could be put literally anywhere. It really wasn’t until the introduction early last year of the Nikon D800 that there was a bigger push to incorporate Nikon DSLRs into larger productions. Some of this is attributed to the fact that the Nikon cameras didn’t have full manual controls in video mode until their newest cameras, but the other reason they haven’t really taken hold is because the image quality just wasn’t very good until the D800. Now we’ve got people like DP Janusz Kamiński shooting with the cameras, and it’s being used on shows like Dexter and Wilfred. More »

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The media management and quality control handled by the digital imaging technician and post house is nearly universally vital in modern filmmaking, where each digital camera brings its own varying formats, workflows, and quirks. This need for DITs and post houses, however, may evaporate just as quickly as it has arisen — at least according to the predictions of Michael Cioni. As the CEO of post house Light Iron, he has helped pioneer RED workflows at the highest level of filmmaking, so his word is not to be taken lightly — particularly since he’s predicting the end of what his and any other post house does as we know it by 2017. Furthermore, what cameras (and therefore camera teams) will have to take care of themselves is staggering, especially taking a look at the duties fulfilled by today’s high-end DIT carts — including those assembled by Light Iron itself. More »

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As we approach the end of the holiday season (and the end of the year), there are still plenty of last-minute gifts or great deals specifically for filmmakers. You might have already purchased a Wii U or Xbox 360 for someone in your family (or Playstation 3 if you’re still rocking those), but there are plenty of extremely useful gifts for filmmakers that won’t cost you an arm or a leg, and they’ll probably be put to more use than a video game (though I guess that depends on the specific filmmaker). Read through to check them out. More »

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Canon has had an ongoing relationship with industry professionals like Shane Hurlbut and Vincent Laforet, but now it seems Nikon is getting in on the action, calling on frequent Steven Spielberg Director of Photography Janusz Kamiński to shoot, and Guillermo Arriaga, writer/director of The Burning Plain and writer of Amores Perros, 21 Grams, and Babel, to direct a horror film shot only with the Nikon D800. This is a big step for Nikon, who has lagged behind the rest of the DSLR video world until this generation of cameras. More »

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Kevin Good over at CrisisLab has recently published a comparison of both higher end (Canon and Nikon) and less expensive (Sigma and Tamron) lenses common for various types of DSLR shooting — 24-70mm f/2.8 zooms. The test compares overall clarity, both at the center of each lens as well as at the edges, the quality of bokeh, the amount of vignetting, and the ability for internal optical image stabilization. The results of each test were weighted against the going price for each lens, in order to determine which possesses the best overall value. Read on to check out the video — and which lens may have the most bang for your buck. More »