» Posts Tagged ‘resolution’

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VsauceCameras are the “eyes” of cinema, recognizing, capturing, and processing images at certain frame rates and resolutions. But, what about our own eyes? At what “frame rate” do we process images and at what resolution? In these excellent videos, Michael Stevens, host of everybody’s favorite YouTube science channel, Vsauce, shows us how our eyes compare to cameras, not only in how well they “see”, but also in how they “record” images. More »

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Editing Video editing is one of the more personal facets of filmmaking in that no two people do it exactly the same way. We all develop our own media workflows, our own ways of organizing projects, and we all cut differently. Unfortunately, sometimes the editing habits that we develop aren’t necessarily the best, and sometimes they’re just straight-up lazy and they don’t help us do our jobs to the best possible extent. Luckily, a new year is right around the corner, which means that it’s time to start making resolutions and to start working on giving up the bad editing habits that have been holding our work back. More »

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Joe Rubinstein

Joe Rubinstein and his team at Digital Bolex have been developing a new, fully digital version of the most sought after 16mm camera brand in the world, the Bolex. After some lively debates on their forums, Joe decided to address a topic that he found to be particularly engaging with both fans and naysayers alike: is 4K worth it? Joe delves into what 4K is all about after the jump.

This is a guest post by Joe Rubinstein, founder of Digital Bolex. More »

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Sony plans to ship a 4K home theater projector, the catchily-named VPL-VW1000ES, for 25 grand in early 2012. Given the $13.50-a-ticket price to see a movie here in New York City, I’ve found myself disappointed at a few recent films where the image felt soft. Sony is on the record about 4K in theaters (PDF link), and I’m convinced that it is indeed the future for the big screen. But at home? I have a 720p projector in my apartment, and it looks pretty damn good. I can only imagine that 1080p would look better, and I don’t know that I could ever tell the difference between 1080p and 4K. Still, that’s not stopping Sony — and RED — from pushing 4K projection in the home. More »

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The just-announced Canon Cinema EOS C300 has a 4K* sensor. But yes, there’s an asterisk there, and it turns out the Super35 CMOS sensor’s native resolution of 3840×2160 (which is exactly double that of 1080P’s 1920×1080 resolution) isn’t a “traditional” 4K, and the camera outputs at 1080P. It reportedly has 1920 x 1080 pixels for red and blue, and 1920 x 2160 pixels for green. Here’s the deal from DV Info: More »

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One of the highlights of NAB’s “content theater” screenings was the Single-Chip Camera Evaluation, the result of an exhaustive camera shootout conducted in February by Robert Primes, ASC and a full crew (totaling what was estimated at over 5,000 man- and woman-hours). After seeing the terrific half-hour presentation at Zacuto’s booth, I went back for a second look at the full presentation. While the images — which should be released online in the future — are far more important than the charts, here are some key results from the screening, which featured cameras ranging from the cheapest Canon DSLR to cameras costing hundreds of thousands. More »

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Video gurus Art Adams and Adam Wilt have put the Sony F3 through a suite of proper resolution, aliasing, IR sensitivity, and tonal-scale tests, and compared it with the Panasonic AF100 (now in stock at B&H), RED, and ARRI ALEXA cameras. We’ll have to wait for Zacuto to publish their forthcoming single-chip shootout to get a look at proper real-world comparisons (their DSLR vs film shootout was nominated for an Emmy), but here are the result for the time being. The F3 gets 12 + stops of dynamic range — before upgrading to S-Log, which Sony is claiming offers significantly more dynamic range — which, in this price range, is unprecedented. More from their results: More »

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I adapted this headline from a piece I remember The Onion running thirteen years ago. The Onion’s excoriating 1997 article, entitled “High-Definition Television Promises Sharper Crap,” lambasted the increase in TV resolution for doing nothing to raise the quality of the actual content itself. YouTube’s recent announcement that they now support 4K resolution is easy to poke fun at for the same reason, given no one was complaining that the thing missing from YouTube (which already offers 1080p) is more resolution. More »