» Posts Tagged ‘sigma’

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Sigma 50mmIn the never-ending backlog of new products that we have yet to cover, there’s one product that many of us have been waiting on for quite some time. I’m talking, of course, about a new addition to Sigma’s steller Art lineup of lenses, the 50mm f/1.4. Anybody who has used the 35mm f/1.4 or the 18-35mm f/1.8 knows that Sigma means serious business with their Art lenses, both in terms of performance and price. Needless to say, this is an exciting announcement for people who love the traditional 50mm focal length. Read on to get all of the details! More »

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Sigma 24 105mm f4Sigma has announced the 24-105mm f/4, the latest addition to their Global Vision line. With all the talk circulating around Sigma’s 18-35mm f/1.8, with its high performance and price tag that’d make any low-budget filmmaker smile, it might be safe to say that their newest lens might generate a significant amount of attention, too. According to cinema5D, the lens will find itself amongst a lot of competitors, and without reviews or demos to gauge its performance, we have to rely on the specs given. Read on for more information on Sigma’s new lens, including specs and price tag. More »

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Sigma 18-35We’ve talked about Sigma’s new 18-35mm f/1.8 several times before here at nofilmschool. Since it was announced back at NAB in April, the lens has generated quite a bit of buzz (especially when the $800 price was revealed). Now that the 18-35 has been shipping for upwards of a month, and the community has had ample opportunity to test and review the lens, it seems clear that Sigma has hit a grand slam, especially for videographers and low-budget filmmakers. Check out some of the stellar reviews and footage from the 18-35 below. More »

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Sigma 18-35A couple of months back we covered the announcement of Sigma’s super speedy wide-angle zoom, the 18-35mm f/1.8. At the time, I had predicted that it would fall somewhere in the $900-$1300 range, and while that seems like a reasonable price for a lens with these features and of the same quality of Sigma’s other “Art” lenses, Sigma has boldly priced the 18-35 at $800. There were also numerous questions about whether the lens would be sharp wide open and whether or not it would be parfocal (maintaining focus at a certain point throughout the zoom range). Now we have some of the first photos taken with the lens as well as a quick video that sheds light on whether or not the 18-35 will be parfocal. Hit the jump for the details. More »

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Filmmakers love fast lenses. It’s a scientific fact. However, we’ve always had to turn to a sizable kit of primes when we wanted any versatility in our selection of focal lengths due to the fact that zoom lenses are traditionally somewhat sluggish in terms of aperture. Not to mention that some of the faster zoom lenses out there are also variable aperture, which makes them virtually unusable for filmmaking purposes when they’re wide open. But don’t fret, filmmaking comrades, Sigma’s got our back. They recently announced a new addition to their “Art” lineup of lenses, the super speedy 18-35 f/1.8 wide angle zoom. More »

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When considering lens options for purchase or rental, certain criteria may stand out to you more than others. This depends on what you shoot most often, or what a project demands. Perhaps as a run-and-gun doc shooter, you simply need the extra stop you get with one 85mm lens for the same price as another that doesn’t vignette as badly. Or you gave up a contrast performance you really preferred in favor of the IS lens of greater overall value. But what if money were no object, and focal length and speed were matched? An aspect you’d find yourself evaluating closely is the way each handles its bokeh, or de-focused areas of the image. DigitalRev’s latest Battle of the Bokeh is a comparison between Canon, Nikon, and Sigma 35mm f/1.4 lenses in precisely this spirit — with some unexpected results. More »

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The most common way we get color images with digital cameras is with a Bayer pattern CMOS sensor, but there are plenty of variations on that design being used today. The upcoming Aaton Penelope Delta uses a Bayer pattern over a Dalsa CCD, for example, while the RED EPIC-M Monochrome uses the MX CMOS sensor foregoing color filtration entirely. By their very nature, though, color filters of any kind cut down the amount of light transmitted to the sensor. That’s why Panasonic is developing a brand new type of color filter that will employ diffraction to split up the color spectrum, instead of filtration, and thus will be capable of doubling the light sensitivity of the sensor. More »

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Kevin Good over at CrisisLab has recently published a comparison of both higher end (Canon and Nikon) and less expensive (Sigma and Tamron) lenses common for various types of DSLR shooting — 24-70mm f/2.8 zooms. The test compares overall clarity, both at the center of each lens as well as at the edges, the quality of bokeh, the amount of vignetting, and the ability for internal optical image stabilization. The results of each test were weighted against the going price for each lens, in order to determine which possesses the best overall value. Read on to check out the video — and which lens may have the most bang for your buck. More »

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After image quality and design quirks, the most discussed topic regarding the new Blackmagic Cinema Camera is lenses. Specifically, the issue regarding wide lenses. Since the BMCC’s sensor is slightly smaller than Micro Four-Thirds, but uses a Canon mount, one of the complaints has been that it won’t be possible to get a sufficiently wide image with the available lenses in that mount. The team over at OneRiver Media set out to prove exactly what was possible with current wide lenses, and they’ve also created one of the first short projects shot completely on the Cinema Camera (besides everything that John Brawley has done so far, of course). More »

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Dave Dugdale over at Learning DSLR Video is often reviewing gear from a practical and non-biased viewpoint, and the newest video with DeeJay Scharton from DSLR Film Noob is no exception. With the new Blackmagic Cinema Camera, a 24mm lens is going to become your normal lens, so if you’re interested in shooting in lower light at a reasonable focal length, you’re most likely going to want a fast 24mm lens. Dave and DeeJay take a look at the Canon 24mm f/1.4 and the Sigma 24mm f/1.8 Macro on both full frame and crop cameras, but the part of the review that will apply most to those who’ve preordered the BMCC is the performance on the crop sensor camera. Though the crop factor of 1.6 still does not match the 2.3x crop of the BMCC, it’s a much better representation of performance than on the full frame camera. More »