July 8, 2013

Premiere Pro Tutorial: Everything You Need to Know About the New Features in Premiere CC

When you upgrade to the latest version of your favorite NLE, it can get pretty frustrating not being able to move as quickly or efficiently as you did before simply because you're not as familiar with it as you might like to be. I had this experience recently while cutting together a fresh version of my cinematography reel in Premiere Pro CC, and quite frankly it made me a little angry that simple functions weren't working as they had previously. However, I found an excellent tutorial that has everything you'll ever need to know about the new features in Premiere. Hit the jump to watch the video:

So, I went to add a transition to a video track with my nifty keyboard shortcut, and low and behold, the transition ended up somewhere entirely different from where I wanted it. A couple of tries and ctrl z's later, I realized that the new version of Premiere emphasizes clip selection over where the playhead is when adding transitions.

It got me thinking, how well do I really know the new version of Premiere? What other little surprises did Adobe throw in there that might throw me for a loop in the future? Several YouTube searches later, I came across the holy grail of new feature videos on Premiere Pro CC. Here's David Clarke to guide us through the new features in Premiere:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=okRnWsG-pSk

While this video sheds light on my previously mentioned "transitions dilemma," it also brought to light some other really useful features that I can see becoming staples in my editing toolbag.

First and foremost, I am elated that Premiere finally has a Reconnect Media tool that slightly resembles the one in FCP7. Since I switched to Premiere two years ago, I've always dreaded when media went offline. It was a nightmare to deal with, and it made me want  to rip out my hair, especially on larger projects. Luckily, the new tool works just as advertised -- so my hair is safe for now.

Another new feature that looks to be a real time-saver is the Clip Mixer. Trying to do track-based keyframe work was a gamble in previous versions of Premiere, because one little ripple edit could push everything out of whack. With the new Clip Mixer, you have the ability to automate your audio clip properties using the familiar mixing interface instead of keyframing on the timeline or in the effect editor.

Speaking of audio, the fact that Audition CC is now a 64-bit program means that more components, such as audio plugins, can be shared between Audition and Premiere. While there are only a few "crossover effects" currently (like the fantastic iZotope Multiband Compressor), the future of working with audio directly in Premiere looks brighter than ever.

What do you guys think? What are your favorite new features in Premiere Pro CC? Let us know in the comments!

Link: An Introduction to Premiere Pro CC - Youtube

Your Comment

15 Comments

I adore CC. Does everything I need. I'm faster in CC than I was in FCP7 and I was lightening in that.

July 8, 2013 at 12:15PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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marklondon

Multiclip is broken :/ I hope they fix it this week...

July 8, 2013 at 12:49PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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groverhouse

How is it broken? I've found that it has seemed buggy when I tried using it, but I don't have much experience in Premiere and I don't know how it *should* work

July 9, 2013 at 8:57AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Matthew Reynolds

Hi guys,
We had a problem with multicam in Premiere Pro CC (7.0). It is fixed in Premiere Pro CC (7.0.1).

Thanks,
Kevin

July 15, 2013 at 2:53PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Alright, I just switched to Premiere CS6 6 months ago from FCP7. I am back on FCP 7 MAINLY, due to not being able to control audio. Why is it such a huge pain in the balls to put simple keyframes in audio? Why do I have to click a check box to simply move an audio track? Audio is a total nightmare and a deal breaker, I love almost everything else. Also, sometimes a clip will just completely lose audio all together and I will have to re import under a different name to get it to work. I also understand that Premiere CC no longer includes Encore, yes, DVD's are dead but many clients still request them. I want to love Adobe Premiere but until these issues are corrected, i can not. I work under deadline, I don't have time to check/uncheck stuff every time I want to do a simple audio task, it is ridic....

July 8, 2013 at 1:00PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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pacificbeachca

You probably know this already, but you can still install Encore CS6 through Creative Cloud.

July 8, 2013 at 2:31PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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I've completed dozens of projects in CS6/CC (Mac) and have no idea what you're talking about. I also do some pretty complex audio round-tripping with Audition, which is terrific.
I've NEVER lost an audio clip.

July 8, 2013 at 3:18PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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marklondon

My understanding - and I could be wrong - is that Encore IS in fact included with CC, they just haven't released a new version of it yet. So once they update it, Encore CC will be born. Until then, Encore CS6 is still the most current version and is what comes included with the CC bundle. I can't remember where, but I read this somewhere online recently. Unfortunately I can't provide a link as I don't recall where it was.

July 8, 2013 at 5:27PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Brian

Ok, so seems that I was in fact wrong. Did a little digging and it seems that Adobe have confirmed that Encore will no longer be developed. An Adobe rep posting on Creative Cow (http://forums.creativecow.net/thread/378/3367) said, "It is not that we don't see the value of Encore; rather, there wasn't any advancement to be made in this tool that supports a technology that is not advancing or changing."

I understand where they're coming from, but... bummer.

July 8, 2013 at 5:42PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Brian

Awesome features but, still no clip to audio sync? FCPX has it? Should be a cake walk for Adobe to implement.

July 8, 2013 at 1:05PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Actually, they did implement that feature in a subtle way. Just highlight both clips in your project panel, right click, then choose "Merge Clips". In the dialogue box that pops up, select "Audio" and then hit OK. It will then process and create a new clip in whatever bin you're working in. It's not a replacement for PluralEyes or anything like that, but if your project is organized and you know which video and audio clips correspond, it should be relatively simple to line them up.

July 8, 2013 at 7:08PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Rob Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker Freedom
4503

to pacificbeachca - there's a program for audio, it's called Adobe Audition. You can't put all your eggs in one basket and expect the best audio editing. I use Premiere for video editing, Audition for sound and Speedgrade for color correction. I have the Adobe CS6 Production Premium Suite and I have Encore CS6 as well.

July 8, 2013 at 5:33PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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MB

True, I have been using Audition ever since it was called Cool Edit Pro. Love it.

However, round-tripping between Au and Pr is not quite up-to-par with the dynamic linking feature that exists between Pr and Ae. If Adobe could implement it in a similar non-destructive fashion (i.e. having session mix files dynamically linked inside a Pr sequence), that would really allow for great custom-mixing.

July 10, 2013 at 6:18PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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The Reconnect Media tool is cool, but I'm not ready to be a subscription slave to Adobe.

July 8, 2013 at 8:14PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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moebius22

Hey guys am looking for a tutor to teach me Video editind

July 14, 2014 at 1:00AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Stanley kings