January 24, 2014

Which Video Editing Programs are Currently the Most Popular?

NLE Survey Dave DugdaleThe NLE market has seen quite a few changes over the last decade, with Final Cut digging into Avid's dominance, and now Premiere gunning for those who fled the changes in FCP X. So which non-linear editing programs are people actually using right now? Dave Dugdale of Learning DSLR Video conducted an online survey to try to answer that very question. Here are his results:

Even accounting for some issues with the survey that Dave mentioned, these numbers seem like a pretty good indication of where the market is right now. Avid still has a huge market share in Hollywood, but more broadly in the video world, Premiere has very strong numbers. It should be noted that this is probably a more selective sample size either way, and just because your personal NLE of choice might not be the most popular in the survey, that doesn't necessarily say anything about its usefulness.

Based on a lot of opinions about the Adobe CC payment model, CS6 will probably hang on a bit longer than Final Cut 7 has, but certainly the industry has seen a large shift swing Adobe's way thanks to FCP X turning away many faithful Final Cut Pro 7 users. My own informal surveys and the user base of this website both indicate that as well.

Whether you're a fan of Avid, Final Cut, Premiere, or Vegas, one thing is for sure: they all have their pros and cons that can fit into different workflows.

So which NLE editor or editors are you using right now and for what kinds of projects?

Link: Video Editing NLE Market Share Breakdown -- Learning DSLR Video

Your Comment

79 Comments

Premiere is the way to go for intermediate users at this point in my opinion. Adobe has really gone a long way towards finally making it stable and reliable. As of CS5 it was still crashy as all hell, CS6 forward I think it's been really solid, and you get the easy cross-integration with After Effects and Audition.

Final Cut was better for the longest time, but I think they've definitely swapped places now, at least for me.

January 24, 2014 at 1:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Peter

I've used Premiere, FCP, and Avid, but Sony Vegas is (overall) superior to all of them. Lower price, intuitive, powerful, conforms to many codecs (including being able to ingest ProRes), and it has a lot of good plugins. People seem to use Premiere and FCP out of how ubiquitous it is rather than their useability.

January 24, 2014 at 1:46PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Strangely, I agree completely. This was my NLE of choice for a long time, but unfortunately the production company I worked for back when went the FCP 7 route, and I ended up abandoning Vegas. Now my whole workflow is with a Mac. I miss Vegas...

January 24, 2014 at 4:21PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Stephen

I was (am?) a long time Vegas user and have to disagree. Vegas has gotten so buggy in recent releases that I've had to switch to Premiere. And while Premiere has it's bugs as well, and Vegas's basic editing controls are very intuitive... Premiere is so much more stable and so much more consistent with it's interface. Subscribe to Creative Cloud and you get so much more than the Vegas suite can offer. Round trip edits of After Effect elements.... round trip grading with SpeedGrade.... At least Vegas 12 made it possible to save in a few other formats that made projects more portable to other applications, but I've wasted so many hours on Vegas forums, beta testing and logging bugs with Sony, and seen them release buggy after buggy version.... I had to call it a day and move on. Vegas could be so much better but the management at Sony Creative are more interested in regular Vegas updates to earn money, that they don't care how many bugs are in their database. All Vegas users are beta-testers for Sony... many just don't know it.

Now if you've used Vegas without problem, congrats! But my experience with any project of intermediate to advanced complexity results in many hours of wasted time.

January 24, 2014 at 5:26PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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I'm gonna have to disagree. As you I've used all of them and I think Sony Vegas is a solid starting point but not the way to go. Intuitive? yes. Low price? that too. A lot of funny plugins? No doubts..But never as powerful as FCP or Premiere.
Avid is the less intuitive of all of them, sure is good for tv shows and live broadcast, I don't like it though.
but hey! the best Kung Fu is the one you know. :)

January 24, 2014 at 7:33PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Sony Vegas is what I learned on back when the PC ware was between Compaq, Gateway and HP. I was reflecting on this the other day... a version of Vegas back in 2000 has better features than the current version of FCPX. Seriously.

January 24, 2014 at 8:37PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Sean

I spelt *war wrong, now my statement has no validity.

January 24, 2014 at 8:38PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Sean

I started out in vegas and switched to Premiere about four years ago. I recommend vegas for beginners, it is simple and intuitive but lacks most of the nonsense most consumer editors offer. But I felt very limited after a while, Adobe premiere and dynamic link has a hell of a lot more to offer and its pretty hard not to use adobe products when working in the digital realm.

January 25, 2014 at 12:10AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Raul

"I will admit I did a terrible job administrating this survey."

"...I think we have somewhat accurate results..."

These quotes are in the article, in addition to the fact it's a sampling of "my audience" aka learningdslrvideo.com's audience. This is far and away NOT an accurate depiction of the indie filmmaker industry. If you want that, there are far more factual pollsters that handle the industry surveys.

Joe, you fell for a link-bait scheme hardcore.

January 24, 2014 at 1:54PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Rob

While I think the accusation that Joe "fell for a link-bait scheme" is rather presumptuous, I completely agree that the survey is suspect at best.

I would argue that any blogger who wants to offer readers this type of research-driven exclusive, should spend the time and effort into learning how to properly conduct a survey so that the sample size and diversity is within scientifically acceptable norms. Then put the time and effort into properly conducting the survey. If that time and effort are too much, then don't do it.

January 24, 2014 at 2:08PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Shawn

From our own informal surveys and the analytics we use for our web traffic these seem in the ball park of average users. The only major issue with the testing was that you could vote up or down on more than one, but considering there is nothing to be gained from trying to rig this survey, the true results likely weren't too different from what we see here. The biggest thing, which I did mention, is that they may be skewed for Dave's audience. Either way, take the results with a grain of salt but certainly our own analytics have shown a huge jump in Premiere popularity.

Regardless of the survey, I thought it was a good opportunity to see what people were using and why directly from our readers.

January 24, 2014 at 2:19PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Joe Marine
Camera Department

You guys run a great sight. I use it all the time but this survey is truly misleading and since your sight guides a lot of people entering the business, you should hold yourself to a higher standard. If you want to be a working editor in one of the major media markets you have to know Avid and FCP (add Premiere for sure but NO ONE is booking for premiere). I have been a pro editor for 15 years in NYC and LA. If you are a one man band doing it all then you can use whatever you want. I think premiere is great but I can't get ANY of the agencies, post houses or networks to buy it and install it.

January 24, 2014 at 3:31PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Matthew

I use Avid as I have to/need to but I prefer Premiere as it's less clunky and more intuitive. Avid's looking and feeling dated at the moment in my (humble) opinion.

January 24, 2014 at 5:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Darrem

I think Dave was pretty explicit in his humble way of saying this is not a definitive survey of the entire industry - mainly the folks who visit his site. Though the tutorial search statistics were very revealing - I had no idea my old fav Vegas was that popular. I use them all, on both Mac and PC, whatever the client/job demands.

January 24, 2014 at 2:18PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Lance Bachelder

Dave has about 100,000 subscribers. How is this not an acceptable sample size for something like this? If you polled every single person in the indie community do you honestly think the results would be much different?

January 24, 2014 at 2:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Fair point. And well taken. That's definitely a valid sample size. Before suggesting he should do more research before posting, I should have researched that myself.

January 24, 2014 at 4:23PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Shawn

Dave runs a blog called 'learning DSLR video, I really like what he's doing but I think it is safe to assume there are not many indie editors among his followers. I think it is safe to assume that someone who edits a moview on a budget of anywhere between 100k - 20 million dollars probably has little interest in learning about DSLR s and probably edits on Avid or FCP7... in any case this doesn't mean the stats are misleading, they jus do not apply to the indie film scene but more to the DSLR enthusiasts niche.

January 25, 2014 at 12:17AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Raul

I think it really depends on what kind of projects you tend to edit the most. For people in large production houses, I think Avid or Premiere are probably the best options. However, for those who are single-person operations, like myself, Final Cut Pro X is a fantastic choice. Apple has done a TON to update FCPX and bring back features that were missing at launch. As someone who has used it from day 1, it is a completely different program than it was on launch day, and that's a very good thing.

January 24, 2014 at 1:56PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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There are some things about FCPX that just make it a really enjoyable program to edit in. With the 10.1.1 updates, it's faster, more stable and the new library management system has made my workflow much smoother. I shoot a good amount of music videos and multi cam interviews and the multi cam functionality in FCPX is very powerful. But the best part of FCPX is the metadata and and organizational options that are available for all the raw footage.

January 25, 2014 at 2:57AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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julian

I'm using Premiere CS6 @ home, but @ work I have to struggle with an Avid Media Composer 5.5

January 24, 2014 at 2:16PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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LA

I just conducted a formal and scientific peer reviewed survey of the first four editors I came across and the results are as follows:
100% use FCP7

January 24, 2014 at 2:17PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Andrius

Hahahahaha....in reality that's how most statistic works.

January 24, 2014 at 2:26PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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thadon calico

Can someone explain what features would make big production houses prefer avid over premiere?

January 24, 2014 at 2:31PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Jake Jabbs

My buddy just bought a complete avid system, dropping somewhere in the neighborhood of $7k, for computers and work stations and all. I'll admit the main explanation (for going this route and not fcpx or premiere) he gave me was "it is what all the real cinema post-houses use." Under further examination, what I was able to drag out of him is that it handles higher bit depths in sound and image, and that from the beginning all the tool sets are designed with a high-end production in mind (for example... in fcpx when you begin editing sound is presented in 2 channel stereo. You can go to six channel if you choose, but it takes additional steps. In Avid you have no choice but 6-channel surround.) I'm not sure this is entirely accurate, and I would also love to know what separates it from Adobe and Apple's offerings.

January 24, 2014 at 2:45PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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"In Avid you have no choice but 6-channel surround." This is not true. You have mono, stereo, 5.1, and 7.1 as well.

January 24, 2014 at 2:59PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Kenny

Also, Avid has historically been the choice for editing, including that old analog thingie ... whatcha ma call it ... oh, yeah ... film. But, be it a camera like Alexa or a set of Cooke primes, a Hollywood studio will have all sorts of high end stuff that is outside of the beginner or indie crowd.

January 24, 2014 at 3:10PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DLD

There are really 2 things that Avid does that make it better suited for "high end" work: media management, and collaborative architecture. Even a small feature will have an editor, an assistant editor, probably an apprentice, and maybe a VFX editor. On a huge Iron Man-Avengers-Batman-Anything-James Cameron-or-Peter-Jackson-make extravaganza, forget about it...upwards of ten people all sitting at editing machines working on the same movie. In Avid, all of those people can be working within the same bins, accessing the same media, and cutting the same clips and sequences simultaneously. The ISIS/Unity system has a very simple bin-locking method upfront to keep people form overwriting or otherwise changing each other's work, and what I think must be a very sophisticated back-end media administration system to prevent collisions at the media level. Which leads us to media management. Even in a non shared environment, Avid keeps track of your media files for you. It requires you to put everything in a folder structure, and within that folder structure you have to do nothing. You can move those folders around from drive to drive, move files in and out of them, delete stuff, etc. and the software automatically detects these changes and updates itself accordingly to maintain the link to the media files. So, for a small, home grown indie film, that's not a big deal, but on something like a feature or episodic TV show where you end up with hundreds, thousands, maybe tens of thousands of media files, it's a huge deal. Interestingly, the other NLE that behaves similarly as far as I know is Lightworks, which is evidently not even on the radar of the surveyed group.

January 31, 2014 at 7:42AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Patrick

I work in post houses in New York and AVID works really well in a multi user environment. Using ISIS and Unity, we can share footage and bins and projects through a large group of editors. It's not perfect (no system is), but it does well for enterprise level jobs, like large reality shows with multiple editors, or news/ sports programing. It's also a familiarity thing. It's no secret that higher end editors tend to know AVID, whether they like it or not, the talent pool is there for production companies to choose from.

I use Symphony at home and recently Premiere Pro CC, and feel that Premiere is about there for single users, but i'm unsure of its ability in a multi user environment.

January 24, 2014 at 3:10PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Bryce

It plays better in a shared storage environment and is better suited for many editors working together on one project. This is because the way Avid projects are set up. Multiple people can be working in one project at a time. they just can't be in the same bin at the same time. So an editor can be cutting while an assistant is getting the next scene ready to edit.

It is also a mature tool with an endless list of features and tools for long form and tv.

January 24, 2014 at 3:28PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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dusty

I'll bet you dollars to donuts, that DaVinci Resolve will be toping this list by next year. With the edit tab they just added in v10.1 they could be the choice of pros and hobbyists alike. it's free, it's stable, it's from a highly reputable name in post, and did I mention the lite version is free.

January 24, 2014 at 2:46PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Weck.

Here in Miami, most use Avid and Final Cut Pro 7.

January 24, 2014 at 2:47PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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moebius22

This chart is crap. I work for a rental company in LA that rents editing systems to tv shows and movies. 95% of what we send out is Avid. The other 5% is FCP 7. Nobody wants premiere or fcpx. We switched a few post houses over from FCP 7 to Avid when FCPX came out.

January 24, 2014 at 3:04PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Kenny

This is true. Unlikely to change soon.

January 24, 2014 at 6:13PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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marklondon

Why don't you calm down and stop being overly aggressive. This chart isn't about post houses; it is about Dave's user base, which are mostly amateurs.

January 24, 2014 at 7:23PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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S

I'm a pro with 15 years editing in LA and NYC. It's changing but every mainstream network and post house uses uses Avid and/or FCP 7. Premiere is taking off with motion GFX and FX companies but it's still miniscule in comparison.

January 24, 2014 at 3:19PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Matthew

who cares about what other people edit on ? is anyone seriously considering switching his/her NLE because of a survey ? or having confidence issues becos your NLE is not in the top 3 ? LOL

January 24, 2014 at 4:00PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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In my opinion next year fcpx will gain another big slice of that cake. Obviously, I tried every reasonable option before switching from fcp7. I don't know exactly why, but since I do my edits in fcpx (the first with v. 1.0.6), even the most boring job (lets say, a meeting beetwen bank managers edited in multicam) become interesting. In my experience all I can say is to learn fcpx and enjoy apple's little revolution... Unless your job needs something it can't handle (and, outside huge collaborative workplaces, I can't find something it can't do well...).

January 24, 2014 at 4:02PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gabba

It's starting to do well on those bigger projects as well too.

https://vimeo.com/83441833

January 25, 2014 at 3:16AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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julian

Cool! Thanks for sharing

January 25, 2014 at 11:21AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Gabba

As a small indie producer I use all of the Adobe CC lineup - terrific! (on Windows 7). I think Dave D does a great job too and hugely enjoy his videos.

January 24, 2014 at 4:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Rob

I love reading the comments LOL people need something to argue about from boredom

January 24, 2014 at 5:31PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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hazem abdulrab

I disagree.

January 24, 2014 at 6:40PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DLD

No, I think he is somewhat right. Why do you have to be so contrarian?

January 24, 2014 at 10:51PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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jdawg

apple would have two thirds of that pie if they hadn't abandoned final cut studio, and rolled out that little toy called fcx. they made a lot of people realize how effective the adobe creative suite is ... i'm eternally grateful ... and i'll never go back .... and i'm sure about half of that adobe market share came from people who never would have tried CC until apple forced their hand ...

(and don't tell me how effective fcx is NOW; i have a business to run, and i couldn't stand still while apple decided to take 16 months to bring it up to barely prosumer speed.

January 24, 2014 at 6:29PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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sjk

Do you feel better now? Good job.. Now run along.

January 24, 2014 at 7:25PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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S

Don't run along anywhere sjk, I'm with you on this. If people seem passionate about this subject it's because there are a large portion of the readers on this website that make their living with these programs and have a great deal of time and money invested in them. And when the software companies don't listen to there users it can be very frustrating. I think sjk makes a great point, a point that I'm sure is shared by many in the editing community. Just a word of warning to the Final Cut users. I come from a vfx back ground and Apple bought the vfx software called Shake. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shake_(software)
They made it into one of the best desktop Compositors on the planet and with out warning... They just dropped it. Stopped updating it, stopped supporting it, And basically abandoned all of the Shake users. They burned a lot of people the vfx community and I have little doubt they'll do the same to the editing community.

January 24, 2014 at 8:33PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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CC

And Adobe took Creative Suite to a subscription only place with no place for those of us who don't want to be forever paying rent. Too bad, I had just got CS6 and was preparing to move my business to Adobe from FCP 7 based.....then they spring the 'CC' approach. Now I'm going to learn FCP X, no way I'm paying monthly rent for the rest of my life.

January 25, 2014 at 3:59AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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I use Premiere CC and have been using it since version CS4. It works absolutely fine for most jobs. However, I'll be switching to Lightworks when they bring out the Mac version because of he way it can edit. It thinks like am editor more than anything I've seen. What's more it handles multiuser workflows better than Avid ever can. It is also less than a tenth the price of most other NLEs. I'll keep using Premiere though for motion graphics integrated jobs. I also find one still has to know Avid and FCP for contract work when wanting to work at a network or post house. But I'm now thinking there's nothing out there that beats Lightworks for editing when the choice is purely mine.

January 24, 2014 at 6:57PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Andy Parnell

Since 1992 I've used EMC2, Epix, Montage, Avid (4.5-10.0), Lightworks, Heavyworks, FCP 7 (full-time for a show on Bravo), GV Edius and GV Aurora and now back to Avid Media Composer and Avid Newscutter. Never used Vegas, starting to use Premiere a bit as I have CC and more broadcast pros are starting to use it for the same reason.

Premiere has a big audience as he says as it's embedded in CC, but in a professional broadcast setting Avid is what people need to know. FCP7 used to be a must know, now it's Avid and increasingly Premiere.

So if you're reading this on what you should use, any of these is fine. And don't forget FCPX. If you're reading this on what you need to know to get a job in broadcast - Premiere and Avid are the ticket in my experience.

January 24, 2014 at 8:11PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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A cut is a cut.

January 24, 2014 at 8:27PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Haha! So right, I wander if in the old days they had arguments on what razor to use to slice the film...

January 25, 2014 at 12:23AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Raul

I prefer my Japanese made Feather blades.

January 25, 2014 at 3:08AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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julian

Completely off-topic but YES! Feather blades are incredible in my double-edged safety razor!

January 27, 2014 at 12:23PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Nick

There were a variety of splicers: tape splicers, hand-operated hot splicers, foot operated hot splicers.

Splicing film (35mm or 16mm) is a complicated, precise procedure. A splice cannot fail, especially in your original A's and B's as they go through the printer.

The film has to be registered in the splicer using location pins, then cut. Actually, there are no blade involved: the cut is done by two steel bars sliding past each other, shearing the film more like a paper cutter arm. (A single-edged razor blade was used to cut 1/4" audio tape at a 45-degree angle while it was held in a special machined editing block, but blades were not used for film, usually.)

After registering the film in the splicer, using a sliding arm with a sharpened edge on it, the film emulsion was scraped off the piece on the left side so only the acetate base is exposed, but not scraped so thin as to weaken the acetate base. Then film cement is applied to the exposed acetate and the right side of the splicer carrying the other piece of film is hinged down into intimate contact with the left piece of film. The splicer is heated to speed the cement drying. After a few seconds, the splicer is opened and the splice inspected and twisted a bit to test it.

Believe me, film splicing is an art. Too much cement and you have a messy splice and see the splice when projected. Not enough and it falls apart.

The pros in Hollywood used foot operated hot splices for speed, mostly when assembling the final A's and B's for printing at, say, Technicolor. Many editors were not trusted with cutting the original film, only the workprint.

You simply cannot understand what editing used to entail, though film editing was the original NLE system and our current software is modeled after film editing, right down to the concept of "clips" and "bins," which in film are actual cloth bins with hooks above them, for holding physical pieces of film "clipped" from the workprint reel which was a working copy of the original film.

Then you had to sync up the audio, which was another whole department of specialized people. Our NLE "CTI" line showing where you are in you timeline harkens back to the multi-spool synchronizer that held the multiple strips of film and audio (which was also on perforated film) together as they were cranked from one side of the editing bench to the other. Moviola editing machines made it somewhat mechanized. Later this was accomplished with flatbed editing machines like the KEM and Steenbeck.

Filmmaking truly used to be black art magic. Now 6 year-olds shoot and edit on their phones.

January 25, 2014 at 2:36PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Dan

Awesome insight, thanks!

January 27, 2014 at 2:39AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Raul

I was still syncing workprint dailies and single stripe track 10 years ago. But I guess I'm old. :-)

January 31, 2014 at 7:49AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Patrick

I prefer American steel, but a Japanese blade will do :)

January 25, 2014 at 5:00AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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miles

PremierePro at work and Vegas Pro12 at home. happy happy happy, joy joy joy.

January 24, 2014 at 10:56PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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jdawg

My opinion: If you want to work in an LA post house or major production company, learn Avid. If you're a freelancer who doesn't interact with any of the above, use whatever works for you. I don't currently interact with companies that run Avid, and am a longtime Premiere Pro user, so I put up with CC's issues.

A tip: If you want yearly fees instead of monthly, you can get prepaid CC subscription cards from pretty much any place that sells software.

January 25, 2014 at 11:24AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Andrew

We work in the corporate environment. The standard is PC. Period. And HP exclusively. Macs are hated and resisted, and at best are endured if off the main network.

Yet we use both Macs and PCs to edit. The Macs are on a private network, some of the PCs are also on that private network and some of the PCs are using the Company Microsoft Load PC, with encrypted drives.

We are all over the place:
- Media 100 on Macs (which doesn't seem to appear on anyone's radar at all) is used regularly by three of our editors.
- FCP7 by two editors (one regularly, the other occasionally) on, of course, Macs;
- Three use Premiere CS6 (two on Macs, one on a official IT PC)
- One uses Avid on a Mac,
- One uses Vegas Pro 10 on an older XP 32-bit PC and Vegas Pro 12 on the 64-bit Win7 PC

Our corp IT department, after many years of ignoring our editing and graphics need, has standardized on Adobe CS6 and, if we want to edit, we request the Master Collection. Then Adobe announced the Cloud. This is simply unacceptable to IT. By IT policy we don't have ability to get to the cloud. Too dangerous in terms of threats, according to IT. We don't even have Admin Rights to add software if it's not on the official list. Then Adobe announced its cloud was hacked. That really made IT nervous.

So we are stuck at CS6. Also unacceptable, to us. Too many changes in editing software to stick with old software. (Be aware our cutting edge IT department is just now rolling out Win7 and we are running Office 2007. Yeah, seven year-old software!) They could not care less that we are running ancient editing software in "their" network.) They have also hobbled the Win7 load such that it barely resembles the latest Microsoft has to offer.

We have not updated to FCPX when we learned it would not open FCP7 files. Not sure if that still holds true. With the official adoption of cross-platform Premiere, Apple really shot themselves in the foot.

Meanwhile, I use Vegas on a PC. The biggest problem I have is that I cannot output as ProRes. This makes it difficult to share fires with the Macs, whether they are running Media 100, FCP7 or CS6.

January 25, 2014 at 2:02PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Dan

Dan, you can use free command line utility FFMPEG to output to ProRes on the PC (or many wrappers with GUI), but I recommend to use Avid DNxHD free crossplatform codec to share fires with the Macs

January 27, 2014 at 12:17AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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I've used AVID for over 20 years, and taught it, FCP6 and PPPro. What I tell my students is simple: KNOW EVERYTHING. No one cares what you "like," you best know them all.

For me, my choice of NLE is project based. Straight narrative, no big effects? AVID. Effects, photo manipulation, 3D, etc. love Adobe. For fun, speed and "so this is what editing will look like in 5 years," FCPX.

I would only touch Legacy FCP if I were paid to. Then I'd caress it gently because it's so old.

January 25, 2014 at 5:10PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Chriss

Nail on the head Chriss!

January 27, 2014 at 4:00AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Sam

This is probably the lamest piece y'all have posted lately. Even Dave admitted his methodology was flawed. I still can't figure out why it matters who prefers what - and the headline WAS misleading. Just add "for amateurs" to the headline and it makes sense. Avid is the industry standard. But for folks just starting out, final cut is obviously huge. Great if you're on a budget, or an Apple Fan. I love Premiere's workflow with AE and its ability to work with basically any format natively. But I've been on Avid since early '90s and never had a problem adapting it to ever-changing professional needs.

January 26, 2014 at 5:41PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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ronn

It's a 'fun' wee article. But in reality the most important thing for us when choosing an editing system (and let's be honest, they all have roughly the same features. They can all cut audio and visual components together just like each other.), is the time from import to creating. And for us that was FCPX. I'm working on the timeline before I'd organised my thoughts in other programs.
And of course this argument will go on forever. But just remember, it's what you can do with the footage not what program you are making it on:-)

January 27, 2014 at 4:14AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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For novice users, who are looking for affordable software with a large feature set, should check out trakAxPC. It has an excellent range of video and audio editing features and is priced at $40. Definitely worth checking out.

January 27, 2014 at 7:15AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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I used to work for a post house that specialized in mostly promos. We specifically had a client (a big name studio) tell us we were only allowed to edit on Avid, despite the fact that they would never see the original software files (everything was delivered on tape). We used Avid for pretty much everything anyway, but if your high-paying client wants something... that's what they get. Something to keep in mind if you think you can just learn Vegas (or any other specific software package) and demand to use it on everything because you're the editor. It rarely works out that way unless you're a literal one-person show.

January 30, 2014 at 4:13PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Chris

Using just the comments here, looks like the survey. I mostly saw Avid, Premiere, Final Cut (7 and X) and Vegas mentioned. Someone said Resolve by DaVinci, that was the only other one I saw. Seems to be a lot of Premiere and FCP. Huh? I'm still on FCP 7. It is solid and I like Motion which came with the suite. I just edit once in a while now. Our full time editor/graphics artist does most stuff (commercials) in After Effects with Premiere and Avid occasionally.

January 30, 2014 at 5:01PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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I started with Avid back in 1996, moved to FCP in about 2004, then to Premiere Pro (CS5.5, then CS6) in 2012. Our company with 2 edit suites will not do the Adobe "cloud," and neither will I for my personal system. When the older Mac Pro is ready for replacement we will move into the PC world (a bit scary) and go with either Sony Vegas. Media Composer or Lightworks. At this point Vegas has the upper hand in the way we're leaning. There are some things I like about it better than Avid, but Avid is still the easiest and fastest one to use, for me. Also it's probably the most stable. I'm liking what I see about Lightworks (have never used it in person) a lot, but it's lacking in available popular plug-ins. So really, I'm torn between Vegas and Avid. Each has its strong points for the type of work I do (corporate training videos--about 80 a year, personal documentary and narrative shorts work, occasional local spots, product sales videos,etc.).

It used to be that everybody wanted to be compatible with everybody else, but that's not necessary unless you take your work to a post house for finishing. Also, most NLEs today will take edit lists or other project files and convert them with little problem. So we can use whatever works best for what we do. The idea that "everybody" uses PP or Avid and therefore I have to is really quite obsolete.

January 30, 2014 at 5:13PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Bill Pryor

Its interesting to see what different people use, but at the end of the day, these are just tools. One tool may have some feature or perform slightly better at something than another tool, but if they all get the job done then the "best" one for a user is usually the one they currently use. An editor's editing skills are far more important than what tool they use. Besides, competing products tend to keep all products developing, so that's a win-win for all of us. Imagine if there was only one NLE...it would probably be limited in features and cost a fortune.

January 30, 2014 at 7:09PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Dave

I will also add my two cents here. Serious productions do not really need so much bells and whistles. I mean in terms of transitions from one scene to another. You never use all the weird effects and plugins and stuff. What I want out of a NLE is to be able to handle all file formats, be stable and do background rendering so that it does not take forever to export the final product. File management and an integrated backup strategy is also a big deal. Like if you want to move the project to another drive / folder, it must be able to package it all up without leaving out any files. I hate it when you load a project and some files are missing suddenly. 2 cents as I say. ;-)

January 31, 2014 at 1:09AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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adobe is really great for beginners and Amateurs and wedding editing and adobe products are wonderful except for premiere which i really hate cause i see all wedding editors and collage kids still working on adobe, i 1st started with Avid Media composer cause i was working in production houses and TV stations and it was the industry standards, but when i moved to mac 7 years ago i started with final cut and then i moved to final cut x, at the beginning i hated final cut x at their first versions until version 10.0.6 was introduced that i really stopped working on final cut 7 and i started doing everything on Final cut X and now the final cut X 10.1.1 is really wonderful and since i own my own company now, i know how to work on all editing softwares including sony vegas and edius but i chose final cut pro X 10.1.1 and i will never go back to Avid or any other softwares, when i moved to apple i never touched a PC again and i love apple products, from final cut 7 to final cut pro X to logic pro 9 and now logic pro X, and i work on studio one and protools but i still prefer logic pro x , so apple's hardware and software are really very user friendly and very professional and their softwares are very good priced but i can not say that about their machines in regards to their prices, but to me apple machines deserves the money i am paying for but i would love a little less money on their high end products.

January 31, 2014 at 4:55PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Roland

as a doc film maker I find premiere has a a great workflow. it's terrific for working with different cameras and codecs and integrating them well which can be an issue with doc work.
we do run vegas on a laptop for quick editing and i did edit a whole film on it but Adobe has the flexibility I need.
I also like the subscription model as it's great to have the rest of the suite - we can segue a trailer from rough cut to compositing right thru to the website

February 3, 2014 at 9:52AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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newreel

wait, what?

March 15, 2014 at 11:11PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Umm

This guy's gone crazy thinking he can use a software barely better than iMovie for the professional world lol

June 14, 2014 at 7:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Lucas

I don't think this guy is crazy, he is absolutely right! Final Cut Pro X is a wonderful and super powerful program! And it's so incredibly fast! Love it!

June 15, 2014 at 3:07AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Dennis Westhoff

I love My Edius since 10 years. I like file based workflow. It is fast, Flexible, multiform format support.

I finished my 120 Documentary films, 10 Commercial, Two Digital Films.

July 1, 2014 at 5:57AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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SURESHA

I use Adobe CS6 and have been really happy. I hated to leave FCP behind.
I'm curious. Adobe CC is a subscription with a pretty hefty monthly fee if one includes everything in CS 6.

Do you think people will move away from Adobe and to something else?
Thanks

September 2, 2014 at 9:42AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Al

Valuable writing ! For what it's worth , you are searching for a WI 00-2011 , my boss discovered a blank document here http://goo.gl/VQXYm3.

August 10, 2016 at 4:20AM

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