February 28, 2014

Avid Has Been Delisted from the NASDAQ Stock Market. Is This the Beginning of the End?

Avid LogoNot exactly. Avid received a delisting letter from the NASDAQ Stock Market earlier in the week, and while it might seem like the end of the world, this was actually expected. Companies have to maintain certain conditions to stay listed on stock markets, and while Avid was granted a reprieve last September as long as they regained compliance by March, it became clear that the situation would not be resolved in time, and thus they have been delisted from the NASDAQ. So what's next?

Delisting from NASDAQ

According to the Boston Business Journal:

The Burlington, Mass.-based company is in the process of restating a number of financial statements in recent years, and has not filed a financial report with the SEC in more than a year.

In a press release Monday, Avid said the company hopes to complete restatement by mid-2014 and intends to promptly apply for relisting with the Nasdaq Stock Market soon afterwards.

The company was notified of the delisting on Feb. 21 by the Nasdaq Listing Qualifications Hearings Panel, according to the release.

The company's common shares will begin trading on the OTC Markets following the suspension of trading on Nasdaq, according to the release.

Now, being delisted is never a good sign, but the company plans on being listed again sometime in 2014, so it's not actually as dire at first glance as it may seem. That doesn't mean the company is in great shape, however. Avid was only trading slightly above $5 at the time of delisting (down from a high of $67), and they have faced consistent net losses quarter after quarter. Negative growth trends are bad for any company, no matter how big or small they are, and just like we saw with Kodak, they can't be sustained forever.

If you are a user of Avid products, nothing is likely going to change in the immediate future. Just like with Kodak, large businesses can continue operating as usual long into financial trouble, and Avid will be no different, even if things get much worse in the future. While Avid products may be the tools of choice for the highest end productions (and they do make a stable and reliable products), their market share has been affected by products from Apple and Adobe, and that trend is not likely to reverse.

Can Avid Take Back the Market?

At this point it's unclear if Avid can reverse the trend and grow again. Many don't like Final Cut X for various reasons, and there are enough people who also aren't happy about Adobe CC's subscription plans. I know Avid makes more than just Media Composer, but if they'd like to get back into the market at the lower end, redesigning the exterior to make it more appealing overall might be a good first step. Competing better on price would also go a long way towards getting average users into the Avid ecosystem.

Pro Tools may actually have the best shot at keeping Avid alive, but a lot would still need to be done with the current company. Down the road we may even see one of the larger companies buy into Avid for pennies on the dollar, but those acquisitions don't always end well for the products being acquired.

We'll just have to wait and see what Avid has up their sleeves to get back in the black. Sooner or later, they may be looking at some tough decisions just as Kodak did not too long ago.

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60 Comments

Also when people torrent their programs. When i was younger and didnt have money i did that but once i made enough money to actually buy it i did. But not many people will do that since, hey, they already have it

February 28, 2014 at 8:48PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Chrs

I think the bigger problem is when people torrent their programs, evaluate them and decide to use something else. MC and PT have legacy buy-in, there's no longer any compelling technical reason to select them over a myriad of alternatives. Adobe and Autodesk have compelling products and it isn't helping their bottom-line any.

February 28, 2014 at 9:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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nobody

Meh. Piracy is not killing Avid. Avid is killing Avid. Your logic toward piracy has already been proven wrong.

March 2, 2014 at 1:21AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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steve

Avid have historically been proprietary hardware based, which kept small and home editors away from their software. They used to release Avid Free DV which gave students and smallbeer free software... but essentially, skilled up a generation on Avid. Great bit of marketing. The folk who wouldn't buy it ever got a taste, the students (professionals of the future) spoke avid.

Avid and digidesignfell in and out with apple. But all this did was phurq off the end user, who had bought the same propietary hardware (Digi001's, Digi002's, Mojos) and found that they were stuck with power PC macs. In some cases G4's at very best.

So no wonder folk looked elsewhere.

Final Cut was top of the market for a while, and this suited me, as a FCP cert pro user. And then Apple decided that winning themarket wasn't good enough, the market hadn't adopted soundtrack of DVD studio, but hey, maybe if we stop supporting omfies and xmls. we can rule the roost.

Except that track based editing is kind of how most folk do it.

Apple concentrated on vimeo and youtube, Meanthile braodcast tv programmes had to be made. Sometimes captured from, and sometimes recorded to tape. Go Apple. Run forest run.

Which left adobe. My first software actully. old version 6. On a PC. Dabbled with pro etc. Fantastically hardware inclusive. Brilliant shortcut inclusion. Clever Adobe. And then hackers get all the data. Fuck me.

Had the ball and could have ran and ran and ran and ran.

February 28, 2014 at 9:06PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Paul Russell

"...affected by products from Apple and Premiere..." Edit note: Apple and Adobe.
Glad to hear the panic is premature. Cheers Joe!

February 28, 2014 at 9:19PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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I have a friend who works there and he hasn't said anything about anything going wrong.

That said, I have actually been warning him for a while that his company is an absolutely irrelevant dinosaur and needs to start redesigning their products to be more cost effective. Nonlinear editing just isn't something that needs huge honking rack units and proprietary formats meant to lock people into their ecosystem anymore. They should have tried to buy Autodesk long ago, but now it's too late.

February 28, 2014 at 9:56PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Harry Pray IV

Their website only lists the financial info for 2011 (there are other releases but no full financials). This often happens when the records are being audited. In any case, the software will exist in one form or another until it's no longer relevant. It's also the easiest to copy and improve, what with being mostly an intellectual property and all. The NLE market is begging for someone like Black Magic to upset the apple cart once more.

February 28, 2014 at 10:27PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DLD

I agree, as a long time FCP user (bailed after X and will never go back) and Avid user i really hope Black Magic buys Avid. They could do a lot and they are serious about pro's needs unlike Apple who has become a consumer gadget company no matter how hard their marketing dept tries to snow everyone and how loud the fanboys and Reduser wannabe pros yell how much of a gamechanger FCPX is.

March 1, 2014 at 1:17AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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editorx

Agreed. FCPX is for hobbyists.

March 1, 2014 at 8:23AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Razor

Sure. Thank God I'm being paid for my "hobbie".

March 1, 2014 at 10:15AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Mr.Floppy

So batch renaming, keyword metadata organization, dynamic trim tools and the best multicam around are for hobbyists...gotcha. I love it when people talk smack about things they know nothing about.

March 1, 2014 at 1:47PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Not to mention: native red code editing, lut management, countless native file support, XML round trip with Resolve, and it is the fastest transcoder on the market. The export/import times are the fastest I've seen on any NLE and I get sick of hearing the "iMovie Pro" agreement as the software has come so far so fast from its rather rocky start.

March 1, 2014 at 1:56PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Riiiiight. That's why I make money and get work with FCP X. Guess I'm just a "hobbyist".

March 1, 2014 at 3:15PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Mikey

Nice try ;)

March 1, 2014 at 5:27PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Robert B.

It is for hobbyists.

And it's for professionals. Or perhaps that money that keeps appearing in bank account is due to clerical error?

March 2, 2014 at 8:04PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Swissted

Why would BlackMagic buy AVID? They are dead. Resolve gets better as a full NLE + finishing all the time.

March 1, 2014 at 1:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Tulio

Well, it all depends on the price. Sometimes it's better to buy heavily discounted assets than to build them from scratch. Hypothetically, AVID could sell off or close the least profitable/losing parts of their business while keeping the rest. Realistically, lawyers will have a gripe against sell-offs until the degree of damage has been established.
.
http://finance.yahoo.com/q/ks;_ylt=A0LEV17hUBJTJF8AgyxXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE...
.
Their market cap is still around $250M.

March 1, 2014 at 4:31PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DLD

Avid editing software doesn't need "huge honking rack units" and doesn't use "proprietary formats meant to lock people into their ecosystem." Their software supports ProRes and H264 on the timeline without conversion, just like FCP and Premiere. Breakout boxes are not required. I run Avid Media Composer with AJA hardware, on my laptop. The arguments you're making are from 10 years ago.

February 28, 2014 at 11:10PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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I think what he meant is that Avid no longer corners the market because huge racks full of proprietary hardware are no longer needed, therefore, people such as yourself can edit on a laptop and minimal equipment with great results.

March 1, 2014 at 1:14AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Shatto1

Actually, what he said is: " I have actually been warning him [his friend at AVID] for a while that his company is an absolutely irrelevant dinosaur and needs to start redesigning their products to be more cost effective", regarding the “huge honking rack units” and doesn’t use “proprietary formats meant to lock people into their ecosystem.”
The main point is that this opinion makes no sense. Avid isn't going anywhere.

March 1, 2014 at 2:09PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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If you're referring to "AMA Editing", it still has a long way to go before even being stable. As a multi-platform editor (editing regularly on Final Cut, Avid, and Premiere), I find Avid as the most bug-laden software currently on the market. This has been the case for as long as I've worked with it (back in version 3.5 and now in version 7). At best, AMA works about 50% of the time before crashing Media Composer entirely. On bad days, it behaves like an early alpha build and refuses to function at all for inexplicable reasons. I'm tired of tech companies releasing features for products without running them through proper testing first, and it's sick of them to use their clientele as guinea pigs for broken updates. It's especially detestable when this is supposed to be "the tool of the industry", when, in reality, they just keep tacking on new modules to an outdated framework. It might be time for them to take a leaf from Apple's controversial book and consider a complete overhaul of the system, because Avid FX doesn't hold a candle to After Effects, Avid's keying tools are leagues behind Red Giant's Primatte Key, and the laughable "Avid Media Access" functionality is nothing more than a bandage taped over a blown gasket.

Honestly, the only thing Avid has going for it anymore is ISIS.

March 1, 2014 at 9:38PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Paul Moore

I edit with Avid on my laptop, works great. Still a great piece software, I can't speculate about the company's future but the software is far from archaic, it's cutting edge in most respects. They are still the standard bearer in the industry.

February 28, 2014 at 11:15PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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I'm not sure how I feel about this. I use Avid daily at my office doing reality show post. I feel like it is the right application for a show with 15+ camera groups and 20 editors, 8 AEs and 20 Producers working on 40+ episodes, but other than that situation the differences from FCP and Premiere are starting to become less important. I do love me some AVID, but would I pay 3 times as much for it?… I haven't felt the need to yet doing freelance or even multi-camera stuff. At this point you can customize any of them to fit your style, so sometimes the rivalry seems more like something to argue about than anything else. Which means AVID needs to appeal to a broader audience to keep profitable (which doesn't mean the pros will like it) I see shows more and more looking for FCPX editors in LA. With shrinking show budgets post producers are looking at $1000 of software per station vs. $300. So in my office, 48 Stations of AVID costs $48,000 48 Stations of FCPX costs $14,400. All of this depends on the show, but if you have Preditor types making your content, FCPX makes sense. If you run a traditional model where story producers do string outs and then a bunch of editors take on the various parts AVID may be worth it. Use the right tool for the right job. It is good to have options. I hope AVID lives on. Competition is a good thing.

February 28, 2014 at 11:49PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Dash Render

Are you based in L.A.? I would to find more work with FCPX as most of my gigs lately have been on Premiere.

March 1, 2014 at 7:51PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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At the bottom of this forum, Marianna (from avid) has a bit more info: http://community.avid.com/forums/p/125975/721571.aspx#721571

February 28, 2014 at 11:51PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Lunalobo75

I used avid for a few years. They had a great deal where you could buy the academic version (which was a full featured version minus some plug ins) and get free updates for four years. The one problem I had was the round trip in and out to a compositing program. And whenever I mentioned that Avid should figure out how to integrate compositing into their program, everyone on the forums jumped down my throat all capsing AVID IS AN EDITING PROGRAM!
Well I since switched to Adobe CC because of how easy it is to go back and forth between premiere and after effects. And I never went back. These days editing is compositing for small production companies like mine. And the more integrated the editing program is the faster I can get my work done. And I think that sort of blind eyes to the future is what has hurt Avid.

February 28, 2014 at 11:55PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Avid is awesome. Anyone complaining has not used it long enough to know how powerful of a program it is.

March 1, 2014 at 1:26AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Julius

Yes, AVID still is the best EDITING software ever. But today people want something that does everything and the actual editing functions of a program are ignored.

March 4, 2014 at 2:11PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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FJ Torres

The company is still around and their software is very much in use. Call me when they actually go bankrupt.

March 1, 2014 at 1:59AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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moebius22

From the provided link on their community forum, it said they are busy with the "financial restatements" ... the countdown for the lawyers to get involved is .... 3, 2, 1 ... financial irregularities = shareholders lawsuits ... a tough hole to climb out of regardless of the business climate ...

March 1, 2014 at 3:10AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DLD

I've been a professional assistant editor / media manager for the past 2 years and I genuinely feel for anything long form, nothing comes close to Avid.

Currently I'm working on 5 separate feature films, 4 dramatic and 1 archive led, which leaves me working with a large variety of formats; RED, Alexa, XDCAM, various annoying, and outdated, Archive formats (over 3000 clips currently). Before this I worked in a large television broadcast company (who shall remain nameless) wherein their whole infrastructure relied not only on Avid Media Composer but also Avid Newscutter and the reliability the software brought to the table.

This isn't to say Adobe and FCPX don't have their place; fast turn around, short form projects, that don't require transcoding for mixed formats (I'm primarily thinking Premiere here) Avid doesn't even come close to being appropriate even with recent AMA improvements. But I genuinely feel with all the NLE's that I've worked with, none come close to matching the stability that Avid offers. Sure there's a learning curve and that can be intimidating for people coming from an FCP or Adobe background but the time invested, more than pays off.

If Avid goes under, my current employ have a bit of thinking to do as to what we're gonna replace it with. I'm admittedly, very curious about Lightworks...

March 1, 2014 at 5:20AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Jack

Someone will pick up the patents if the company itself goes down. I reckon the name will stay the same as well. Someone on the linked finance forums posted that their OTC uptick was based on the investors speculating on a takeover. AVID is bleeding red.

March 1, 2014 at 12:08PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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DLD

Very interesting reading here:

The Street - Why Avid (AVID) Is Falling Today
http://forums.creativecow.net/thread/335/66457

and

Avid Technology Reviews
http://www.glassdoor.com/Reviews/Avid-Technology-Reviews-E2291.htm

March 1, 2014 at 8:18AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Razor

Hi Razor, just to reiterate Avid's correction on this matter, The Street article printed erroneous financial information. A Creative COW member graciously posted our full correction to The Street later in that same thread. which you can read here: http://forums.creativecow.net/thread/335/66457#66512.

Adam
Editor-in-Chief, Avid Blogs

March 2, 2014 at 2:26PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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@Adam - Thanks. I now see the correction post, but still and aside from Avid's own admission of 8 1/2 years of negligent accounting, and the diversion of new products coming out... Avid is still not showing or stating a generation of revenue to be profitable. So now what do you want us to think?

March 3, 2014 at 10:13PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Razor

This article seems specious at best. I question Mr. Marine's credentials as a financial expert .

March 1, 2014 at 11:23AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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ronn

And I question why you thought Mr. Marine was a financial expert in the first place.

March 1, 2014 at 11:51AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Rob Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker Freedom
4496

Good thing no one pays me to do it I guess. :)

I clearly stated that this wasn't a huge deal, and it was actually expected. Avid is in the process of restating financial statements for a number of years and since they aren't going to be done by the deadline for compliance, they are being delisted. Once that process is completed sometime this year, they will apply to be listed again.

Their stock still isn't doing well, and they've posted net losses quarter after quarter. They aren't some little startup, which is why even though the delisting isn't a huge deal, the company still has a lot of major issues to work out.

I wanted to post this because people kept sending it to me as a sign that the company is done for, but that's not really the case.

March 1, 2014 at 2:22PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Joe Marine
Camera Department

@ronn - And I'm questioning your specious reading comprehension.

March 1, 2014 at 4:59PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Razor

media composer is only a small part of Avid's income. Go read their 10K report first. their NLE products amount to 10-15% of their income. they make most of their money in shared storage products & support for those products. then again it might not even be that much if they have been cooking the books.

Ask any ProTools user about the latest release - you have to update your hardware or you can't run PT10. a lot of unhappy campers out there right now looking at alternative products.

Avid's main problem is their arrogance. its in their slogan "We're AVID". WTF cares ? I've watched them screw their users over time and time again and handle them in ways no company that values their customers would. however they count on blind loyalty to their products and that the competition can't compete - in their eyes. So while for the moment they might have a better product for reality TV shows, Adobe AnyWhere just adopted by CNN is about to eat that last bit of pie they had. Anywhere allows shared storage and collaboration across locations. While its for now a high end big price tag product, I'd expect smaller versions to trickle down and bits of its tech to come to PP.

you also have to realize that reality TV and high end features represent a very tiny part of the market compared to all the users out there. unless they return to their old prices there is no way to sustain their product at current prices in such a small market segment.

then consider they are limping a 20+ year old UI along. that doesn't work so well either.... I truly doubt BMD would buy the MC product from them given that they are building some NLE tools into resolve and would more than likely expand this are a of the product.

March 1, 2014 at 12:20PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Methinks you have AVID confused with Apple.

March 1, 2014 at 12:50PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Jay

Methinks you make the mistake of thinking the two are different.

March 1, 2014 at 9:47PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Paul Moore

Avid can do anything Premiere can do anything FCP X can do anything Lightworks can do anything Blender (NLE) can do anything etc., etc,. etc. can do. They don't all do all the same things as easily as the others but you can use any of them to edit your film- which is the point of an NLE. And Avid seems to be the one that has the biggest magical aura of "professional" around it and why I wouldn't mind it going away. I understand there' s good reason for it but a good editor is a good editor and should be able to learn any NLE fairly quickly with all the tutorials available online. I would miss Avid's musical products though. But there are other programs for that too. What separates the pro from the amateur is NOT the program (now a days), but the skill. Stock listing isn't everything but add negative cash flow for a couple of quarters and a company that is quickly losing its identity and it looks like the disease is terminal. RIP Avid.

March 1, 2014 at 2:52PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Eric

Well said. A truly skilled editor can switch between NLEs seamlessly and can complete tasks regardless of the tools given.

Not to say that we're not allowed favorites :)

March 1, 2014 at 9:46PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Paul Moore

Guys, why no one talks about how outdated the Media Composer? After their announcement at NAB '13 about adding frameflex option instead of adding support for projects with frame sizes larger than HD, I thought "Media Composer is over".
Currently many companies offering shared edting solutions cheaper than Avid, and with support for modern hardware.
Sorry for my English )))

March 1, 2014 at 3:20PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Iskender

Avid Media Composer is not a piece of software for everyone and everyone's workflow. But it is the best editorial piece of software for multiple people working on massive amounts of shared footage. That's why feature films and television are cut using Avid. The massive amount of footage and the necessity of sharing. That's why every news station I've walked into uses News Cutter. CNN is not switching to FCPX. A good editor can edit on anything, but try being a freelance editor in a major market and not knowing Avid. Their are valid reason that it is the standard, and most of them have to do with deploying software in massive facility. If you work from home ISIS, Interplay, Phrasefind, Scriptsync, and countless other Media Composer technologies may not matter to you. But lots of people require those technologies and no one else is delivering.

And yes, those seats of Media Composer do cost $1,000. It's incredible. That's less than 1/3rd of a seat of Maya or Smoke or 1/4th of the cost of AutoCAD. Hell, it's 1/14th the cost of a C300. Professionals spend a lot of money on their gear because they want something with very specific feature sets. And yes sometimes they make you get rid of your old hardware, just like Apple does. I expect a piece of Avid hardware to run 24/7 for a decade without breaking, but I was glad to trade in my Adrenaline for a DX.

All of that said, I really hope that Autodesk or Blackmagic buys them. They have been run horribly for a very long time. The past 5 years of product design has been a lot better. They have so few engineers when you compare them to Adobe or Apple. But more importantly they need to get their management and financial house in order.

And for the record I do own seats of FCP7, FCPX, and Adobe CC, and I am a fan of disruptive technology. Old legacy software can't pivot as fast, but it has it's place in our workflows.

March 1, 2014 at 5:23PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Sam

Well said :-)

March 1, 2014 at 7:15PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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marklondon

Don't forget the extra cost that comes with ISIS, Interplay, remote editing feature, and extra features within Interplay, though.

I'm not saying it gets us anywhere close to a C300, but if you're going to write out prices, let's be honest here.

March 1, 2014 at 9:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Paul Moore

Yeah, and that C300 doesn't come with lenses or a tripod or memory cards or a slider or a lav mic. etc etc.

Professional video production equipment is expensive. So is professional video post production. So is professional audio production. So is professional metal machining or wood working. I mean, you can make a set of kitchen cabinets without a table saw, and a really good carpenter is a good carpenter no mater what tool they use. But if you want to make a living out of it, you gotta invest in the tools that are going to make your workflow work for you.

I actually really like the way Avid has moved to a pay for feature approach. Not everyone needs Symphony or Phrasefind. People might see if as nickel and dimeing, but I see it as lowering the entry cost and allowing you to build the system that works for you. The open initiative has allowed people to build systems with AJA and Blackmagic hardware. In my office we use a Facilis Terrablock instead of ISIS for our Multi-User Read/Write Shared Storage.

March 2, 2014 at 7:58AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Sam

Here we are again. Reminds me of Quark Xpress.

March 1, 2014 at 5:29PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Robert B.

Actually, despite all the Avid ranting I've been doing, I find myself feeling the same way I felt about Twinkies when Hostess filed for bankruptcy. I would like to see them come back, as much as I dislike what they're doing with their software right now. There's just something comforting about seeing an old dog keeping up with the pups. A phoenix metaphor might be more appropriate here, but I seriously doubt Avid is going to make a magnificent enough comeback to warrant that.

March 1, 2014 at 9:54PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Paul Moore

Joe Marine said: "Their stock still isn’t doing well"...

I'm afraid that article is not going to help ;) Like they said in spider man, "with great power comes great responsibilities". NFS does reach a lot of people that may see that article as a red alert rather than what it was intended to.

March 2, 2014 at 2:04AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Anthony Bert

NoFilmSchool is one of my favorite sites covering our industry. Kudos to Ryan, Joe, and the rest of the team for consistently turning out interesting articles.

The theme of this particular article compels me to encourage the NoFilmSchool community of readers attending 2014 NAB Show in Las Vegas next month, to also attend our inaugural Avid Customer Association event--Avid Connect. If you want to influence the future direction of our industry and get insight on the future direction of Avid, directly from Avid, you'll want to participate at Avid Connect. Hope to see you there in Vegas!

Adam
Editor-in-Chief, Avid Blogs

March 2, 2014 at 2:42PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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After years of buying pro tools hardware, I was most upset that none of it is needed any more. Avid has caused me to look elsewhere due to their policies.

March 6, 2014 at 9:20PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Topgun

My archived AVR77 media can't be read by AMA. Nuff say.

March 7, 2014 at 1:05AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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tcwdoggy

Kind of a sensationalist headline don't ya think? "Avid" isn't going anywhere anytime soon. The company, Avid Technologies, might go under but the products they currently sell won't. Every movie, TV show, newscast - everything- is built on a foundation of Avid hardware. Obviously this website is frequented by a small army of people creating content using other tools, and when I say "everything" I of course know that there are exceptions, but the number of those exceptions is so small that the hyperbole is warranted I think. Someone will buy the company if it fails, but for those of us in the industry nothing will really change.

March 7, 2014 at 3:11AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Patrick

Except InDesign was a viable replacement for Quark. PP and FCPX aren't there yet in terms of what Avid customers need (hint: it's not 4K...)

March 7, 2014 at 3:20AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Patrick

"Specious" ..... 3 or 4 times here. This is funny. So Adult. Is this the latest Buzzword ? I find my Trolling Specious
Already working on the Pro Tools and Adobe replacements. And they are not ......Specious. They have been "vetted". Oh,sorry - that is 3 years old.

March 10, 2014 at 7:45PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Dheep'

LOL... just LOVE how such blather always come from people that admit to NOT EVEN USING IT. Wow, yeah. You are SO credible!! Why don't we all take YOUR word for it, huh?? :-)))) Not just some self-important, arrogant hack.... neeeeeew....

May 11, 2014 at 2:23PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Andie

Hi Joe, just to update this story, we celebrated our December 2014 return to the Nasdaq with a ceremonial ringing of the opening day bell at Nasdaq's MarketSite Studios in Times Square last Friday. Full recap here: http://www.avidblogs.com/live-at-the-avid-nasdaq-opening-day/. Exciting times!

January 20, 2015 at 11:49AM

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