September 14, 2015

Here's Your First Taste of Footage from the 4K URSA Mini (& a Sneak Peek of a Full Review)

Blackmagic URSA Mini 4K First Footage
At long last, early versions of the URSA Mini 4K are starting to make their way into the hands of filmmakers.

A group of wedding cinematographers based out of the Netherlands — a group collectively known as The Dreamers — recently got their hands on two URSA Mini 4K cameras (not the new 4.6K sensor), and in their typical style, they went out and shot a pair of weddings this past weekend. The footage not only looks great, but it covers a wide range of lighting situations. If you're interested in seeing how this camera handles daytime exteriors with lots of vibrant colors and backlighting, as well as a dimly-lit club with lots of mixed lighting, this footage is for you. 

Also, keep scrolling to get a sneak peak of a full review of the URSA Mini written by a member of The Dreamers, Hugo van Dijke, which details the group's experience working with the camera is a challenging and fast-paced environment.

Even though much of the attention for URSA Mini cameras has been given to the version with the 4.6K sensor — and rightly so, considering the impressive specs and diminutive price compared to anything comparable on the market — the 4K version of this camera has a lot to offer for its price. At $3000 for the EF mount version ($500 more for a PL mount), this camera packs one hell of a punch considering that it offers way better ergonomics and slightly better specs than the Production Camera 4K at exactly the same price. 

No word yet on when exactly these cameras are going to start shipping to those who pre-ordered them back during NAB, but Blackmagic is hoping to have the first batch out by the end of the month, with more and more shipping throughout the fall.

Clearly though, since the URSA Mini has the same sensor as the big URSA and BMPC 4K, the footage isn't really what we're curious about -- it's the form factor and new features. So, here's a sneak peak of Hugo's review of the Mini, detailing his first impressions unboxing it and a bit about the approach he and The Dreamers took in order to compare it to the BMCC.

As soon as we unpacked the Ursa Mini, two things were clear. First, this thing is light. It isn’t small (especially with a lens and a V-lock battery attached), but it isn’t that big either. With a Lanparte V-lock, top handle, Blackmagic Viewfinder and a Sigma 18-35 in place, it weighs just 12.1 pounds. And second, the Ursa Mini looks badass. Batman black. It is incredibly well designed -- everything is exactly where you expect it to be.

After a few tests in the afternoon, we were excited to try the Ursa Mini 4K in a real life situation. And doing what we do, we brought it to a wedding the next day. And to another, the day after. We decided not to shoot from the shoulder, as we didn’t have any time to practice and get used to it. Usually, our BMCC’s are stuck to a monopod all day -- monopods are great for wedding videography as they allow for very steady shots. Also, it doesn’t put as much strain on your body as a shoulder mounted camera does. Weighing in at 13lbs (the Ursa Mini, Viewfinder, battery and Sigma 18-35), the camera is easily carried around all day. We decided to only bring one Ursa Mini, and have Yael (my colleague) shoot with the BMCC. This would give us a good opportunity to compare them.

Again, be sure to check back soon to read Hugo's full review of the URSA Mini.     

Your Comment

62 Comments

Looks beautiful. Some ugly FPN in the first two low light shots at 2:20 though... the same as my Production Camera at ISO800.

September 14, 2015 at 8:11PM

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Derek Mindler
Cinematographer
239

Right, that's to be expected as they are the same exact sensor. For some reason it's still an issue that they haven't totally been able to solve.

September 14, 2015 at 8:15PM, Edited September 14, 8:18PM

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Joe Marine
Camera Department
4570

That looks like compression artefacts. Is that really occurring on capture?

September 15, 2015 at 7:48AM

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Benjamin Bush
Docu Producer
95

There's definitely compression artifacts as well, but they don't show up as the vertical lines running up and down the image, particularly in the shadows. The compression actually is hiding the FPN a bit.

September 17, 2015 at 11:46AM

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Derek Mindler
Cinematographer
239

"URSA Mini has the same sensor as the big URSA and BMPCC"...
I think you meant URSA and BMPC (Blackmagic Production Camera) rather then BMPCC (Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera). Too many acronyms!

September 14, 2015 at 8:41PM

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Zachary Will
Cinematographer
939

Footage for the 4k looks awesome, Cant wait to see footage for the 4.6K version. I pre-ordered mine, but i'm also in no rush to get it. BHPHotoVideo has updated the arrival for both the 4.6k and 4k Ursa mini's and looks like the 4.6k will now be out in NOVEMBER 18 2015.

September 14, 2015 at 9:51PM

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Damn. Why didn't they use the new sensor and just limit the spec to 4k. Fixed pattern noise usa deal breaker.

September 14, 2015 at 10:30PM

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Vincent Gortho
none
1213

Mostly because the new sensor is of the 4.6k type. What would anyone gain from them purposefully limiting their product?

September 15, 2015 at 5:11AM

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Oscar Stegland
DP/Steadicam
1303

avoiding the flaws of the old sensor like FPN if its gone.

September 15, 2015 at 11:28AM

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Vincent Gortho
none
1213

Either I don't understand your original point or I'm not understanding you now.

The 4.6k is a new sensor and thus, the odds that it will have the problems of the 4k sensor are pretty high. My question is, what would anyone gain from them limiting a 4.6k sensor to 4k?

September 17, 2015 at 3:05AM

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Oscar Stegland
DP/Steadicam
1303

They think the 4.6k sensor will fix the issue... I think it's likely to be the same issue on it though.

Will have to wait and see the test footage

September 20, 2015 at 8:51PM

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Jason Han
Cinematographer
279

Really we need to see the 4.6 in various situations and a proper DR test, otherwise nothing new here.

September 14, 2015 at 11:34PM

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Jonathon Sendall
Stories
1748

FPN !! ... again !!? ... This is really disappointing Blackmagic ..

September 14, 2015 at 11:36PM

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Arthur
181

that's because it's the same 4k sensor, its not a 4.6k sensor!

September 15, 2015 at 12:14AM

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Linas
42

Whatever¡ Long life to Blackmagic

September 15, 2015 at 12:19AM

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Chema Mumford
Filmmaker, Documentary, Cinematographer
293

Also, ugly moire at,
00:30 seconds, blue vest shoulder,
1:08, blue suit of groom, especially around the collar,
2:00 and 2:53 blue suit.
Disappointing.

September 15, 2015 at 12:31AM

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Stefan Markworth
Filmmaker
81

An OLPF should sort that out.

September 15, 2015 at 1:04AM

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Jonathon Sendall
Stories
1748

I was thinking the same.

September 15, 2015 at 8:53AM, Edited September 15, 8:53AM

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Edgar More
All
1321

I saw that too... that's some serious moire that you can't do much about. I noticed this in a lot of BM footage

September 20, 2015 at 8:57PM, Edited September 20, 8:57PM

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Jason Han
Cinematographer
279

I guess a denoise program would resolve this but, c'mon already.

September 15, 2015 at 1:14AM

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Vincent Gortho
none
1213

I tried out the Ursa Mini at the IBC conference in Amsterdam this weekend. The colors and dynamic range coming out of the sensor are very good, The quality of the 12 bit raw and 10 bit ProRes HQ footage it produces should not be underestimated. Ursa mini has a better codec than all those cameras producing H264/H265 (AVCHD etc.) compressed video, like the A7S/R, GH4, C100/300, FS5, FS7 etc. The 4.6K sensor will produce an even better image than the 4K chip. At just 2850 Euro for the 4K, I think that is a good deal indeed. From my own short experience at IBC I think it is not really a run-and-gun camera however. (pretty heavy still and not small) On the other hand: it's build like a tank and feels very sturdy, so durability is no problem. Low light: although it can shoot at lower light conditions, it is obviously not a low light camera, it tops out at 800 ISO. Noise levels at 800 ISO look very acceptable to me. Anyway, I think that Blackmagic is doing very good work. If they keep innovating at this level and speed, in a few years you'll have something close to Arri Alexa, but for less than 5000 USD. Within the next 5 years or so camera technology will no longer be the limitation. What then? What will we do when we have the perfect camera? :-)

September 15, 2015 at 1:58AM, Edited September 15, 2:10AM

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Erwin Hartsuiker
CineVideo-NL videographer
788

According to blackmagic design the native iso is 800 or slightly higher, and it tops out around 1600.

September 15, 2015 at 5:29AM

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Oscar Stegland
DP/Steadicam
1303

That's probably the 4.6K sensor then, but not the 4K one.

September 15, 2015 at 8:40AM

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Erwin Hartsuiker
CineVideo-NL videographer
788

You are totally correct. My bad. Difficult to remember the specs for the 4k, seeing as how they only ever talk about the 4.6k when mentioning Ursa mini.

I wonder what the frame rate options on the 4k will be in comparison to the 4.6k, and whether or not it will have the same option of switching between global and rolling shutter.

September 16, 2015 at 2:54AM

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Oscar Stegland
DP/Steadicam
1303

I was on IBC as well: the Ursa mini is indeed still pretty heavy.
Don't forget it is called mini, because the Ursa is a very heavy beast of a camera, not because it is so tiny. (The micro cameras are tiny, btw: waiting for someone to create an elegant SBUS only connector, so I can control the lens with a Spectrum Remotecontrol :-) )

BTW, how could you judge the imagequality? Did you bring some memory? (I'm planning to bring memorycards next time :-p )

About low light: in 2009 ISO 800 was 'very low light', at this moment ISO1600 is so common in pro cameras it doesn't mean a lot anymore when talking about low light situations. (The FS5 starts at 1600.)

The codec is great, and large, so in my situation where faster delivery is often preferred to the beauty grading RAW can bring, RAW is often too time consuming. And since ProRes/DNx is often good enough and can be delivered from various cameras thanks to the external recorders, I will only rent the Ursa-mini if I really need it.

September 15, 2015 at 11:57AM

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WalterBrokx
Director, DOP, Writer, Editor, Producer
9798

Hi Walter,

I could only judge the image quality by shooting with the camera at the booth, and trying out the various settings (ISO, shutterspeed, iris etc) while looking at the 46 Inch monitor they had in connect to it. It looked to me like the monitor was color calibrated. The details in shadows were good, and the highlights were not easily blown out. Of course the scene the camera was pointed at, was well lit. I've also shot with the BMPC 4K for 1 year, and it had the same image quality, as far as I could see. I did not see any FPN in the URSA mini, but then again I could not test the camera to the extremes.

I do get your point of using an external 4K recorder and storing the footage in 10 bit 4K. That does add another 1200 USD to cost though. Also not all lower cost (below 3500 USD) camera's put out clean 4K HDMI at 10 bit, 4:2:2. Only the GH4 does that as far as I know. At the Sony booth I tried out the new FS5, very nice. But limited to 8 bit 4:2:0 at 4K I believe. So in my mind, that makes the blackmagic Ursa Mini 4K a better camera regarding dynamic range, even with the SLOG3 tricks used to put 12 stops of DR in 8 bits.
Anyway, each and every camera will always find a niche in the market, because of some unique quality it has that appeals to certain people. I'd love to see some properly shot footage out of the blackmagic 4.6K chip that is said to have 15 stops DR. We'll have to wait and see I guess.

September 15, 2015 at 3:12PM, Edited September 15, 3:14PM

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Erwin Hartsuiker
CineVideo-NL videographer
788

Good ggggggod, wedding videos are the absolute worst, especially in heavy slo-mo. Kill me right now.

September 15, 2015 at 2:01AM, Edited September 15, 2:01AM

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Terma Louis
Photographer / Cinematographer / Editor
1681

And what did you ever make? I suggest you try it once, nail every shot the first time and still make something beautiful.

September 15, 2015 at 2:11AM

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Gerbert Floor
DP / Director / Camera / Editor
464

This is superior to anything I've seen shot with a GH4, NX1 for sure.
Moire? Yes, it's a cam mainly for fiction and narrative, not for wedding and for a controlled environment. Try not to have your actors dressed with clothes that produces moire. For me there is no doubt that the superiority of the footage I look at has something to do with the color space. Whether they shot in raw or ProRes, this is miles ahead of anything coming out of the current mirror less 4 K cams. The 4.6 K sensor? What for? More rez? Really for an independent film that might end up on the net? More rez? The biggest block buster of all time, supposedly, the last iteration of Jurassic Park, was mastered in 2.5K. Somebody is really waiting for a 4.6K to shoot some piece that will never be distributed in a theater near us? The extra 2000 bucks that you save getting the 4K instead of the 4.6K will buy you many other needed things for your low budget production. HOw are you going to feel when, in 18 months they have a 5.2 K ? Are you going to trash your "new" 4.6K? That cam has 4K, a LCD screen, XLR and most of all can shoot ProRes 444. That's all you need, get to work. Remember, there is a guy who just shot a film using Iphones 3 and nobody complained about the way it looked.

September 15, 2015 at 5:08AM

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That was quite the rant, my friend! I strongly urge you to spend some time Googling and reading about the differences between the Ursa Mini 4k and 4.6k, because there are a lot more differences aside from the ".6" that you see in the title.

September 15, 2015 at 5:22AM, Edited September 15, 5:23AM

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Tim
438

Have you read anything about this camera? I don't think anyone wants to get the 4.6k version for the resolution. To start with the 4k sensor has been riddled with problems, and the worst of them (FPN) is visible in the video. Even worse is that there's no solution for it. If it's bad enough in a given shot, you'll basically have to redo it with better exposure.

Secondly, the native iso is twice as high (around 800) for the 4.6k.

Can't find specifications for it, but most likely different frame rate options.

The most important difference lies in the dynamic range. The 4k sensor is specified to 12 stops. In raw, it has great capabilities to manipulate in post, but some tests have shown this sensor to top out at 8.4 stops with an acceptable noise floor. That's worse than a 5dmkii.

The 4.6k sensor marks the first time BM design have been a part of the process and customized the sensor to their taste as opposed to just picking one off the shelf. If all goes well it will be capable of 15 stops. It also has a better color science (the closest to the original cinema camera).

You ask me, I'd rather spend $2000 more and get a camera that's at the forefront of technology than one that will most likely have plenty of problems and fall behind much quicker.

September 15, 2015 at 5:27AM

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Oscar Stegland
DP/Steadicam
1303

you can use a denoise program to rid of the FPN- there is a solution. No cause for alarm.

September 15, 2015 at 11:32AM

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Vincent Gortho
none
1213

There's no denoising program that actively removes FPN no. Basically you have to go into photoshop/AE and isolate the pattern, put it on as an overlay and change opacity so it cancels out the pattern. After that, you have to apply a denoising program to remove the actual noise in the image like you would any other camera.

My point is, it's unacceptable for something they're trying to sell to pro's. If it adds a bunch of hassle/work later, which other cameras don't. It's a problem.

I'm really hopeful for the 4.6k-version and I'm looking forward to trying it out. But Blackmagic have a lot to prove in my eyes. Great on paper, but so far none of their cameras have lived up to the hype, nor have they been close to being as reliable as any of the workhorses in the industry.

September 16, 2015 at 2:44AM

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Oscar Stegland
DP/Steadicam
1303

Yeah there is no way to actually denoise this kind of FPN. You'd have to do the steps Oscar mentioned which sounds like the biggest waste of time.

I've always been told that you never see BM cameras in big productions because they are way too unreliable for paid shoots, it's more of a art project / indie, short film camera for the budget conscious filmmakers rather than a pro level camera.

September 20, 2015 at 9:10PM, Edited September 20, 9:10PM

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Jason Han
Cinematographer
279

I think the reason for 4.6K is twofold. 1.) It will allow shoot 4.6 and you can drop down to 4K for crop just like 2.5K to 2K. 2.) Marketing.

September 15, 2015 at 5:34AM

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Read my post above. The 4k-version is the same camera as Ursa and BMPC4K in a new body, and by the looks of it, the mini 4k will also inherit the problems of those cameras; fixed pattern noise, black hole sun, bad lowlight, etc.

The 4.6k version is inherently an entirely new camera and it's the first time Blackmagic have had the chance to tailor a sensor to their quality requirements as opposed to just shopping off-the-shelf parts.

September 15, 2015 at 6:18AM

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Oscar Stegland
DP/Steadicam
1303

Hi Oscar,

I owned the BMPC 4K for 1 year and I would not say that the camera is "bad" in lowlight, it all depends on your reference point ofc. At that time I also owned a Canon C100 and I shot with both. The C100 is said to be "good" for lowlight. When I compared shots between the two cameras the difference was not as big as I expected. I would say that for normal lowlight situations (a party in a normally lit living room, dinner at a restaurant) the BMPC (and URSA Mini 4K) are certainly usable, when you mount a F2.0 or faster lens. The footage in this article shows that. My point is, that because the A7S II can now shoot kind of noiseless at up to 25600 ISO, it does not mean that all other cameras are "bad" at low light.

September 15, 2015 at 8:48AM, Edited September 15, 8:49AM

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Erwin Hartsuiker
CineVideo-NL videographer
788

The A7S/A7SII do noise-reduction in-camera which the BM-cameras do not. The point is that no Blackmagic Camera has so far had a native ISO higher than 400. Some as low as 200. In combination with the FPN-problem with underexposure you're severely limited in what you can do with lowlight.

A C100 has not only a higher range of ISO-options, it also has a much higher ISO, as well as being much more usable at higher ISO values. Out of all the cameras I've shot with (most higher end cinema cameras, but ironically never the A7S so that's not my reference), the Blackmagics are the ones I'd feel least comfortable using in lowlight situations. I'll give them that the footage is great if you shoot raw and manipulate it in post.

My point was that the 4.6k-version will have at least twice as high a native ISO which would bring it up to similar levels as Alexa and Dragon (with the new standard OLPF) when it comes to lowlight performance, whereas the old one is at half the light sensitivity. None of these cameras are designed to be shot in unlit, uncontrolled environments though. That's where Sony dominate the market.

September 15, 2015 at 10:22AM

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Oscar Stegland
DP/Steadicam
1303

Sure. By the way, I still don't understand why people complain about low light capability? If you were going to shoot with film wouldn't you have to understand how to lit a scene? It's not a cam for doc and wedding, it's for filmmaking and it means you must bring the lights. If you shoot wedding just get an NX1 or a GH4. So from what I understand all the original problems that were found in the original 4K sensor haven't been fixed?

September 15, 2015 at 10:24AM, Edited September 15, 10:24AM

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Well, we don't know yet. They may well have reduced the FPN to a much lower level. An improvement by 2 stops or more would do the trick. By the way, most digital camera's have some level of FPN. To try it: just shoot a dark scene, and then bump up the brightness by several stops. After a few stops (usually 3 or more) you will start to see FPN. It's just that on the BMPC 4K the FPN was "too visible". But that's my personal opinion.

September 15, 2015 at 3:23PM

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Erwin Hartsuiker
CineVideo-NL videographer
788

All cameras have noise, which is easily corrected by a denoising program. Most cameras don't have a pattern overlay of noise, which there are workarounds for, but it's an unnecessary extra step in the turnaround process.

What do you mean by bump up the brightness? The iso? F-stop? Lights? Generally the FPN-issue is most prominent when the image is underexposed, especially at 800 iso where a digital gain is applied.

September 16, 2015 at 2:52AM

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Oscar Stegland
DP/Steadicam
1303

Which is exactly what I said not 4 cm above your post. These cameras are made for controlled and lit environments. Why I was complaining about the old cameras is because they're especially bad.

Why not embrace the one advantage with digital, that no one can debunk? That advantage is lowlight. Nearly every other cinema camera on the market has a native iso of somewhere between 800 and 2000. Most are even usable at different iso settings. So far the BM cameras are not particularly useful at anything other than their native iso and preferrably perfect exposure. This is a problem for someone like me who wants to get it right in camera. If I want a certain look and feel like underexposure is the way to go I can do that with almost any other camera.

If I wanted low-light performance I'd most definitely not go for GH4. That's Sony's cake.

From what I've understood, none of the problems of the original 4k sensor have been fixed. They weren't fixed for Ursa, and most likely will not have have been for the mini either. Hell, a year ago the CEO of Blackmagic Design declared that the FPN-issue was just a figment of hundreds of stupid customers' collective imagination.

September 16, 2015 at 2:39AM

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Oscar Stegland
DP/Steadicam
1303

"Hell, a year ago the CEO of Blackmagic Design declared that the FPN-issue was just a figment of hundreds of stupid customers' collective imagination." I actually remember that.

September 16, 2015 at 4:39AM, Edited September 16, 4:39AM

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agreeded

September 15, 2015 at 7:24AM

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Kyle Lamar
Director Producer DP
1208

Guys come on it's a great image and for the price... $3.5K for a 4K PL mount camera!!!

Another great tool to add to our arsenal. Great work Blackmagic!

September 15, 2015 at 6:23AM, Edited September 15, 6:23AM

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Wayne Yip
Director
225

Stunning footage out of this camera the noise floor seems a little better than the BMPC. Cant wait to see the 4.6k.

September 15, 2015 at 6:47AM

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Caleb Rasak
Camera Operator / AC
383

Footage looks good. There's some obvious moire and I would have liked to see more ambition in the color grade considering ProRes and Raw are options, but that's just me. What's good though is that if the image from the 4k sensor looks this good, hopefully the 4.6k sensor will be a large improvement on that. Still looking forward to trying one. Thank you to the guys who filmed this. Appreciate them giving us something to look at.

September 15, 2015 at 7:10AM, Edited September 15, 7:10AM

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Jerald Roberts II
Filmmaker
328

No.

September 15, 2015 at 7:19AM

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Gene Nemetz
live streaming
1928

looks good. I want to see low light shots!!! What can the sensor really do?? Very little noise though

September 15, 2015 at 7:23AM, Edited September 15, 7:23AM

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Kyle Lamar
Director Producer DP
1208

NOTE THIS IS NOT THE NEW SENSOR! This is the same sensor as in the 4K Production Camera. To all those who are complaining and upset about FPN, Moire, DR, etc... you have to wait and see what the new 4.6k camera is capable of.

September 15, 2015 at 7:27AM

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First of all, im a BM shooter and am very fond of their products. And a LOT about this URSA mini is really cool and I am very happy about, I fiddled a bit with the camera at IBC and spoke with some of the guys there.

But: "It is incredibly well designed -- everything is exactly where you expect it to be."

There are a few design choices I really do not understand.
The air vents are at the top of the camera, making them very exposed to the elements, even with a little bit of rain youre gonna be worried abour water getting into the camera!

And secondly, the audio level adjustment button are behind the monitor! meaning that if you are shooting it from your shoulder... you cant reach them!

and lastly, the funcitonality of the handgrip was a bit underwhelming, it only has record, auto iris and autofocus at this point, although possibly they'll add functionality. But a clickwheel for aperture control would be so much better! The handle is LANC connection so there will propably be aftermarket handles made for it but still, could have been better!

September 15, 2015 at 11:15AM, Edited September 15, 11:15AM

5
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Ruben H
74

"But a clickwheel for aperture control would be so much better!"

Seriously. The absence of this is silly at this point, and makes BM look dumb. I've already encountered shots with my BMPC that had to be compromised because I had no way to adjust the aperture on the run.

September 21, 2015 at 7:36PM

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David Gurney
DP
2309

Yep this footage is what Sony, Panasonic and Canon lack at this price range. Alexa type footage. Its milky and has great skin tones. All the low light bitching is just amatuer and it shows from the same conversation of people who talk about it over and over again. This footage rocks and you definitely can make a movie look like a movie without all the heavy trendy lazy FilmConvert plugin and play way nowadays. Good job Blackmagic.

September 15, 2015 at 4:22PM, Edited September 15, 4:22PM

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Joe Gonzalez
Filmmaker/Editor/Photographer
147

Footage from the $700.00 Panasonic FZ1000 actually looks pretty good.

September 16, 2015 at 5:19AM

0
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Gene Nemetz
live streaming
1928

The blue-green tint looks a little unhealthy.

September 16, 2015 at 5:16AM

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Gene Nemetz
live streaming
1928

Still looks a little like video to me. Impressive technology nonetheless. I'll wait for some user FS5 footage or perhaps that new, rumored pro-sumer RED that might be announced.

September 16, 2015 at 7:30AM, Edited September 16, 7:30AM

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Thomas Ramsey
DP/Editor
74

The FS5 will not look anymore cinematic than this or it's big brother FS7. It does not have CineEI mode, which is what makes the Sony cameras look a lot more cinematic. I'd say that the FS5 will be a hell of a lot more video than this footage, though you probably won't get this massive moire / FPN issue

September 21, 2015 at 3:03PM

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Jason Han
Cinematographer
279

I've been thinking seriously about investing in this camera but the true costs of buying either 4K or 4.6K are much more than advertised. What you need to really get going is a couple of C fast cards (£500-800), the viewfinder (£1,000), possibly the shoulder mount (£300), batteries + charging station (£300-600) some cine lenses (£400-1100 min), filters etc. Sure if you have these already then it's a worthy and cost effective investment but for people looking at this camera as a first buy low cost option I'd be wary. No doubt the 4.6K and the 4K do give gorgeous image acquisition irrespective of NFP or moire issues present here in the 4K but for my needs (a first time buy for run-n-gun doc work/newscasting mixed with a bit of film) its clear all these things will add up as will the weight. I am a little surprised no one has called out BMD for having you pay an additional grand (almost half the price of the body) for the EVF. So if being seduced by these camera prices online first add 1K immediately to the price you see. Or am I wrong? Please someone tell me I am wrong. Gorgeous camera and great work by BMD - this will definitely be perfect for many of you out there but for my needs which are pretty specific I'm torn between this and something a little more accessible - but god dammit I like the idea of this camera!

September 16, 2015 at 1:45PM

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Benjamin Bush
Docu Producer
95

Re: Roxy - FPN means Fixed Pattern Noise. This video demonstrates Blackmagic's FPN issues in ASA settings and sensor heating https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lMnp05dLmfc

September 17, 2015 at 2:42AM

3
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Razor
VFX Colorist
465

A few issues here and there (some FPN and morie), but overall this looks excellent! I'm hoping the 4.6k version I have on order will completely seal the deal and deliver out of the ballpark performance to at least land in the Arri parking lot.

September 17, 2015 at 9:06AM, Edited September 17, 9:06AM

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Benton Collins
Camera aimer
416

It's too bad the Sony FS5 is almost double the price of this camera. Way nicer image. Way better sensor.(same as the FS7)

September 21, 2015 at 3:26PM, Edited September 21, 3:26PM

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Drew Staniland
Actor/Videographer/Writer/Director
271

CFast was a huge mistake by BlackMagic. This puzzling regression (from SSDs) means that a terabyte of raw-capable storage that used to cost $700 will now cost $3000 (as much as this camera). And it will not come down, because CFast will never see widespread consumer adoption as CF and SD did.

This lack of widespread adoption also means the format is likely to have a short life, and when it's gone, your camera's pretty much useless after your cards wear out.

September 22, 2015 at 10:57AM, Edited September 22, 10:57AM

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David Gurney
DP
2309