How a Stop Motion Animated Film is Brought to Life: Charlie Kaufman's 'Anomalisa'

Though Anomalisa, the partially Kickstarted stop motion animated film from  and Charlie Kaufman, has screened at a number of festivals, it won't be in regular theaters until next month. Until then, we've got some terrific behind the scenes videos that show the incredible artistry it takes to bring these figures to life. First up is Variety, who talked with animator Carol Koch:

And here's a great BTS featurette from the Paramount YouTube channel, which gives an overview of what it took to put the film together:

With the animators creating over 1000 costumes and props, and well over 1000 faces, the process is incredibly challenging and time-consuming. In all, the film consists of 118,089 individual frames, and it took the animators a full day to get just 48 frames, which is only 2 seconds of footage. It must be difficult to even begin to see the finish line when the process is this slow, but full credit must be given to the amazing animators who work tirelessly to make these characters believable frame after frame. 

If you haven't seen it, here's the trailer for the film:

As far as the gear used, the film was shot on the Canon 7D, along with DitoGear's Omni Slider. Here's a list of what Starburns Industries (who animated the film) used to make the film:

  • Canon 7D
  • Apple iMac
  • Dragon Frame Software
  • DitoGear Omni Slider (servo)
  • DitoGear Omni Head
  • DitoGear LensDrive
  • Dragon Bridge Box

     

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