April 21, 2016
NAB 2016

Digital Sputnik's New RGB LED Fixtures Were the Main Lights Used in the Upcoming Star Wars Film

Don't be fooled by low CRI, the DS system actually sends more color information to your camera's sensor.

The goal of the DS system is to put the colorist's toolset directly into the lighting technology itself. Digital Sputnik founder Kaur Kallas says that due to their color science, their units were selected to be the main lighting source on Rogue One: A Star Wars Story  meaning all the practicals and and off-screen fixtures were Sputnik's. Fully controllable with an iPhone app over Wi-fi, the DS1 units sell for around $2,500 each, the three light DS3 module for around $8,000 and the DS6 light module for $13,500.


No Film School's complete coverage of NAB 2016 is brought to you by My RØDE Reel, Shutterstock, and Blackmagic Design.

No Film School's complete coverage of NAB 2016 is brought to you by My RØDE Reel, Shutterstock, and Blackmagic Design.

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Your Comment

3 Comments

Don't be "fooled" by CRI at all. The relevant measurement for cameras is TLCI, not CRI. Would like to see the TLCI for these lights.

April 25, 2016 at 10:43PM, Edited April 25, 10:46PM

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David Gurney
DP
1573

OK, there are TLCI results for at least the DS3. And they're not good:
http://www.gtc.org.uk/members-area/tlci-results/current-tlci-results.aspx

April 26, 2016 at 4:26AM

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David Gurney
DP
1573

All light Measuring methodology stems on the light source compared to the full spectrum instead of what Camera equipment reads. I've notice 3 new ways of measuring light in the past 4 years and all of them say the other is wrong or inferior. TLCI, CQS,TM-30-15 and they all use software to mimic a camera and still use a spectrometer looking for the full spectrum. Digital Cameras only collect RGB photons in its bayer filter so everything in between is lost and doesnt pick up. However if you are mixing the RGBW and mixing them to tricking your eye to seeing that color the Camera will also assimilate it as if it were that spectrum but more saturated and for cameras the more info the better.

I have worked with the the Newer DS product and i will tell you that any measuring method for light is still trying to look for the full spectrum, thus the reason why the tests are not good. but if you see the light and footage for yourself you will see that the images pop and dont seem to be flat. Its a more saturated light meaning it has depth in its colors. Why would big triple A movies want to use a dull looking light with bad color rendition? They wouldn't, and i can tell you big movies test camera and lights for a week to a month before shooting and if it didnt look good or work out it would be ousted.

April 29, 2016 at 7:28PM, Edited April 29, 7:30PM

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Mike Mack
DMX TECH
147