Is it Too Late For You to Find Success? We Have Visual Evidence...

Screenwriters Beck and Woods want you to know that you have plenty of time left.

Many of us get discouraged at the fact that we feel like we are aging out of the industry. Many of the success stories we read are about people who have had overnight success. People in their early 20s cashing checks and buying houses. 

I just turned 33 this week and I have to admit, I was a bit down about my age and where my career was within Hollywood. 

But I turned my frown upside down when I saw this tweet from Beck and Woods, the writers of A Quiet Place (among other fantastic scripts). 

This tweet completely dispelled my worry that I might have passed my prime when it came to screenwriting. It shows that age is just a number, and storytelling is all that matters. 

We need to top determining our worth as creators by a number on our driver's licenses and instead focus on the ability to captivate an audience. 

And it wasn't just this awesome graph that reminded me that some of the best people of all time started late, but also the replies to the tweet. 

Age is just a number when it comes to storytelling. So don't worry about what you can't control. 

So the next time you're feeling down about this stuff just remember that you are in control of the stories you tell. Keep cranking our drafts, churning out stories, and honing your craft. 

We can't wait to read what you write next. 

What's next? Get our free screenwriting eBook

So much of what we're talking about on No Film School when it comes to screenwriting is summarized in our new eBook. It also helps guide you through a 10-week writing plan that will get your script actually finished. 

Keep reading.     

Your Comment

10 Comments

Love this post. So encouraging and will be something I continue to look at in the years to come.

June 1, 2020 at 10:42AM

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Matthew Tibbenham
Director/Writer
118

1st of all Clint Eastwood as a cover of this article is misleading as if he made it when he was well into his 60s. 2nd many of us over 40/50 do not have the energy we once had, and most importantly bills to pay, families, etc., which means we have to make a living doing whatever, many times working in video production. This is an almost impossible business to get into unless you get lucky. Most filmmakers just make films for themselves with whatever money they are able to put together and with whoever has it in their heart to help them out. The intentions are good but the reality is not.

June 1, 2020 at 3:43PM

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Paolo Mugnaini
Director/DP/Editor
234

"Not having the energy" is an excuse, maybe even one you put in yourself. If family and "regular" work (=financial security) is/was more important to you than working in media, then well, do it, for gods sake! It is our choice to fill our lives with the things we want to do. But if that desire is burning inside you, don't give that up!

June 2, 2020 at 12:57AM

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DingDong
2050

How old are you? Do you have kids? All these things play a huge factor. Work a full day come home take care of the kids and you will see how much you have left. As we age things change and I simply do not believe there is no age limit or no limit. We can keep doing personal projects but as far as "making it" I disagree.

June 3, 2020 at 1:01PM

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Paolo Mugnaini
Director/DP/Editor
234

I agree with the previous commenter. How much does it really mean to you? Where on your list of life priorities have you put "making it"? I'm in my 40's, work 80 hours a week, keep my bills to a minimum, still have an abundance of energy for my craft, and deliberately put marriage & kids on hold to specifically avoid the frustration you mention and focus my attention on what I believe is my purpose in life. Not that you should neglect your established responsibilities, but take a look at where your level of passion really is and try not to stay discouraged as that can also extinguish the flames of other aspiring filmmakers.

June 5, 2020 at 5:32AM, Edited June 5, 5:48AM

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Thanks for this article/posting, Jason.

I'm turning 42 in a few months and even though I've established myself very well in the postpro and vfx field and got so wealthy Corona didn't bother me at all, making films is what I always wanted to do and what I've been always struggling with. I did a lot of music videos, some of which ran on MTV, I did short films which won some little awards but anything beyond was a task too big until now. But I think Corona opened my eyes. It put all of us into the same place. Suddenly it doesn't matter whatever you do, even those "important" people were reduced to sit at home and be humans again. So in the end it's just about being yourself, not doing stuff to show off and finding your place in life.

June 2, 2020 at 12:48AM, Edited June 2, 12:50AM

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DingDong
2050

It's a good headline, to make me click this post.

June 2, 2020 at 8:10PM

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Tukang Togel
Tukang Togel Online
74

This is a very encouraging post, and today really needed some form of encouragement

June 3, 2020 at 12:17AM

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I'm 48. Creatively I feel I haven't even peaked yet and still have loads to offer as an up and coming fiction feature filmmaker, yet since around 35 years of age, opportunities seemed to dissipate rapidly. As a father now too, finding free time to keep writing and making films is difficult (but not impossible). I hope my work and talent will eventually get noticed, but realistically I think it is unlikely now ....and that fact disappoints me.

June 4, 2020 at 8:49AM

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Derek Boyes
Writer/Director
109

CANNOT READ THIS at all...the word is too blurry as a JPEG.
No...it's not because I'm old.
What're everyone opening and reading it as?

June 8, 2020 at 9:36AM

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