November 30, 2014 at 4:06PM

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What to get?

Im thinkin of getting a Canon T3i with EF-S 18-55mm kit. Have been reading and asking other photographers/cinematographers and they have suggested getting tge t3i. Im not quite sure if it would be the best camera for my first DSLR, im shooting with a HDR CX115E right now and the type of filming has been usuall just dance competicions and tried to make some dance videos but ended up just deleting them.
Ive heard that not only the camera is important but also lenses,sound,editing software,screen etc and i dont know realy anything about them.
Sorry for my bad english.
Would much appreciate any help or advice on buying my a new camera and other important equipment.

Best regards, Silver!

18 Comments

I would also look at the Nikon D5200 or Nikon D5300 cameras, and the Panasonic G6 and Panasonic GH3 cameras. All of these cameras record more detail than the Canon 3Ti does, all of these cameras have less moire and aliasing than the Canon 3Ti does, all of these cameras record better sound than the Canon 3Ti does.

December 2, 2014 at 4:04PM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
30973

The T3i is solid for the price. It's 1080p and 60fps at 720p. It's codecs are far superior to Nikon. Koo (NFS founder) has a topic about this in his free cinematography guide book. Really, Canon overall beats Nikon. If don't believe me, check out Koo's guide!

December 2, 2014 at 4:58PM

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Christian Gentry
Director, Producer
53

>>>T3i : It's codecs are far superior to Nikon

...I have no idea what you are talking about ?

I checked Ryan Koo's "DSLR Cinematography Guide" published in 2012, and I can't find any place where Ryan mentions anything about superior Canon CODECs ?

Pretty much all modern DSLR cameras are using an implementation of the MPEG-4 H.264 CODEC at varying bit-rates. ( for good quality 1080 HD video you want to record at a bit-rate of 17 Mbit/sec or higher, some cameras like the Panasonic GH4 can go as high as 200 Mbit/sec )

From my own experience, Canon DSLR cameras have a very specific look to the color they record straight out of the camera, which some people like and some people don't, but you really need to do proper color-correction and color grading in post to have full control over the finished color of your video.

I have also found that you can reproduce the SAME "Canon" look from other DSLR cameras with proper color correction and grading. ( assuming you want this look )

>>>Really, Canon overall beats Nikon

I would say the exact opposite. Most Canon DSLR cameras have big problems with moire and aliasing in the image they record, which most Nikon cameras DO NOT. This can be a huge problem with professional projects, where you may not spot the moire or aliasing in your image until you start to edit your footage. Moire is almost impossible to remove from your video image in post, which means you either throw away your footage or do a re-shoot to fix the problem.

Canon DSLR cameras also have a more limited dynamic-range compared to Nikon, Panasonic, or Sony cameras. Which means you have to be very careful when shooting high contrast subjects, or you may lose detail in the highlights or shadows of your video image.

I have seen some great videos shot with Canon DSLR cameras, but I would never say that the current Canon cameras are better than Nikon, Panasonic, or Sony.

December 2, 2014 at 5:49PM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
30973

My bad, I worded my comment wrong. I'm not a Canon fanboy, but i think Canon has better color and kicks Nikon's butt in low light sensitivity. That's just my personal opinion (yes, i've had experience with BOTH brands). Overall, it seems canon also is more weatherproofed than Nikon. Nikon's sensors produce sharper images with more contrast, but if you change your Canon picture style, you can get a really nice flat image, so you'll have a decent amount of room to color grade and/or correct. Nikon's not a whole lot better with color compared to Canon. I've run tests and I've noticed a slight, slight difference in post when grading and adjusting my clips in Premiere.

December 3, 2014 at 9:00PM, Edited December 3, 9:00PM

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Christian Gentry
Director, Producer
53

>>>I'm not a Canon fanboy, but i think Canon has better color

I would agree when judging footage that comes straight out of the camera, but once you add proper color correction and grading to the mix I see NO advantage with Canon cameras. ( with the exception of the Canon 5D Mk3 Magic-Lantern RAW hack )

>>>Canon kicks Nikon's butt in low light sensitivity

The DXOMark folks say exactly the opposite when comparing Canon and Nikon cameras under $2,000...

Canon EOS 70D versus Nikon D7100
http://www.dxomark.com/Cameras/Compare/Side-by-side/Canon-EOS-70D-versus-Nikon-D7100___895_865

Canon EOS 7D Mk II review: Low ISO performance lags behind rivals
http://www.dxomark.com/Reviews/Canon-EOS-7D-Mk-II-review-Low-ISO-perform...

Nikon D750 Sensor Review: Another Nikon sensor in the DxOMark top 10
http://www.dxomark.com/Reviews/Nikon-D750-Sensor-Review-Another-Nikon-se...

>>>Overall, it seems canon also is more weatherproofed than Nikon

I haven't found any reliable info that backs this up, but weather-proof cameras are the ones to buy when dealing with rain and dust.

>>>Nikon's sensors produce sharper images with more contrast

Again the DXOMark folks would disagree with you here. Across all camera price ranges, Nikon cameras show a significantly higher dynamic range than Canon cameras do, which translates to LOWER contrast NOT higher contrast in your recorded image.

>>>but if you change your Canon picture style, you can get a really nice flat image, so you'll have a decent amount of room to color grade and/or correct.

Nikon cameras have custom picture profiles too, like the FLAAT custom profiles created by Samuel Hurtado...

http://www.similaar.com/foto/flaat-picture-controls/index.html

...But the BIG difference between Canon and Nikon DSLRs is Aliasing and Moire, both of these problems can completely destroy your video footage, and Canon has a LOT more problems with this than Nikon cameras do. ( my main reason for upgrading to the Panasonic GH4 was to be able to shoot 4K footage and completely get rid of Moire, which can be a big problem when shooting professional video interviews )

...Again, I like Canon cameras but I would choose Nikon over Canon when it comes to choosing a camera to shoot video. ( and I would choose Panasonic and Sony over Nikon when it comes to shooting video )

December 4, 2014 at 1:51PM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
30973

Don't mean mean any hurt feelings by this, but your links are only good, if you wanna live by the specs. I'm just sharing what I've personally learned from testing Canon and Nikon side-by-side. I have seen a difference, not just read about/studied the technical difference(s). I'm not dissing you or Nikon, but my personal preference is Canon (if i had to choose it or nikon - I agree with Pana and Sony being what seems "one step ahead" in video). It's all opinion though! Have fun filmmaking Jaanson! Overall, it doesn't matter what camera you use man, story is king! Keep filming!

December 4, 2014 at 2:25PM

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Christian Gentry
Director, Producer
53

>>>Don't mean mean any hurt feelings by this, but your links are only good, if you wanna live by the specs.

DXOMark is a series scientific tests that are well documented. These are NOT specs but rather the results from a series of tests to determine the performance of any digital camera. The DXO folks describe how they perform their tests in great detail, so many of the tests can be replicated by other people with the same lab gear.

I don't agree with the DXO way of testing lenses because sharpness is always limited to the camera body used to test the lens, so the DXO lens score will change depending on the camera body you use. ( many lenses are sharper than what the camera body can capture )

I've owned the Canon 30D, Canon 40D, Canon 60D cameras, and have shot with the Canon 5D Mk2 and Canon 5D Mk3 cameras for corporate shoots and Indie films.

I am very familiar with the results of Canon DSLRs, and again I don't see ANY advantage with Canon DSLR cameras. But I do see two very large problems with Canon DSLRs ( moire and aliasing ) that Canon has not done anything to fix yet, and for this reason I would not recommend any of the lower priced Canon DSLR cameras. ( the 5D Mk3 is the only Canon DSLR that has these issues under control )

I'm not saying that you can't make great images with Canon DSLR cameras, but I would never say they are better than Nikon, Panasonic, or Sony.

Guy McLoughlin

December 4, 2014 at 6:33PM

Yes get the T3i or T2i if you want to save even more money. You can practice with it and then later on after getting the hang of it use the magic lantern hack. You should just buy the body and then purchase the 50mm f1.8 lens for 100$, because it gives off excellent image. I also recommend looking at the panasonic g6 or the gh2 if you wanted to go with the micro 4/3 system. Gh2 can be found very cheap and the micro 4/3 system is easily adaptable to most lenses. Read more on it!

December 5, 2014 at 1:32AM

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I personally would get a GH3 or A5100/A6000. They are all much more feature rich for shooting video.
The a6000 doesn't have a 3.5mm jack tho, so you either need sony's mics or do dual system sound.

December 5, 2014 at 2:30PM, Edited December 5, 2:30PM

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Josh Wilkinson
Music Video Director/DP
270

Thanks you all for responding il check out the cameras you suggested. I don't have a big budget so any kit I could get right now should be around 700$. What about sound? I've heard that dslr cameras have a bad mic. And I think I'd be shooting alitle low-light scenes and the weather in Estonia is quite wet and cold right now. How would these cameras you have suggested handle with that?

Best regards, Silver! :)

December 6, 2014 at 5:57PM, Edited December 6, 5:57PM

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Check out the Zoom H4n, H2n, and H1. for audio

Christian Gentry

December 6, 2014 at 7:15PM

Thanks you all for responding il check out the cameras you suggested. I don't have a big budget so any kit I could get right now should be around 700$. What about sound? I've heard that dslr cameras have a bad mic. And I think I'd be shooting alitle low-light scenes and the weather in Estonia is quite wet and cold right now. How would these cameras you have suggested handle with that?

Best regards, Silver! :)

December 6, 2014 at 5:57PM

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700euros not dollars, my bad.

Silver Jaanson

December 6, 2014 at 6:01PM

I have no clue why did the comment post 3 times.
Can I remove my comments somehow?

December 6, 2014 at 6:00PM

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>>>What about sound? I've heard that dslr cameras have a bad mic.

The Panasonic GHx cameras have good mics, but you have to be very close ( 2-3 feet ) to the camera to record proper sound.

I would look at buying an external audio recorder to help improve your audio. ( even the Zoom H1 recorder can make a difference )

- I think I'd be shooting low-light scenes and the weather in Estonia is quite wet and cold right now.

The Nikon and Sony cameras will perform better in low-light, but the Panasonic GH3 camera is weather-sealed so you can shoot in the rain with the GH3 if your lens is protected. ( some of the Panasonic and Olympus lenses are also weather-sealed )

December 21, 2014 at 6:36PM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
30973

The 60D is good options with that lenses.

January 21, 2015 at 10:13AM

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Film producer and director
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rogers
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