Are Weird Internet Movies Actually Cinematic and Important?

'Rejected Cartoons'Credit: Don Hertzfeldt
What's your favorite internet video? 

All of the media is changing. I'm not sure we thought it would, but with the advent of YouTube, the whole world shook. Suddenly, we could watch and post our art for the whole world to see. Everyone could access funny videos, shorts, and everything in between.

I just did an article about how we often misuse the term "cinematic," and I think I have to repeat that here. The rise in people putting their videos on the internet means they're trying to share them with the widest audience. That has the same goals as shooting cinematically. 

I guess what I'm trying to say is, Internet videos are under-appreciated. There's just as much passion in some viral hits as there is in some big-budget movies. 

Check out this video from Now You See It, and let's talk after. 

How Are Weird Internet Movies Actually Cinematic and Important?

There's something so beautiful about the completely unencumbered artistry behind internet videos. They're the culmination of conventional media, twisted with personal views, and then presented back to us. They use surreal weirdness and creativity to tackle big issues and ideas.

Videos like "The Story of North America" and "Rejected Cartoons" show a level of care about animation that can be seen as unmatched. They require man-hours, planning, and a visionary mind. 

We've seen creators like Don Hertzfeldt graduate from YouTube to the Criterion Collection, telling stories that got bigger and with more technique and polish. 

While I don't think we can justly call them cinematic, I do think we can say they represent an evolution of cinema. This is where the new voices come from. These are the people who are using our standard storytelling ideas and mediums and bending them to their own will. 

The most bonkers part to me is that I cannot predict what will grab me. Maybe it's an angry cartoon or a musical, or maybe it's just the passing of visuals or documentary experience. Something like Sunrise Earth, which just requires meditation and patience. 

But there's a weird evolution of artistry and cinematic tendencies in these viral internet videos. There's so much skill, inventiveness, and creativity on display. It's almost like we are redefining entertainment. This is a similar situation to all the people crowding in tents in the early 1900s to watch motion pictures. But we're sitting on our couches examining where Hollywood is destined to go. We're seeing the birth of new creators one clip at a time. 

This should be exciting and studied. We're at the beginning of another artform. It's not cinema or TV. I'm not even sure what to call it. 

But it's here.

Let us know what you think in the comments.      

You Might Also Like

Your Comment