October 18, 2011

Canon Announces EOS-1D X Camera with Full Frame Sensor and Enhanced Video Performance

Canon today announced their new top-of-the-line DSLR, the EOS 1D X. Merging their various 1D models into "one D to rule them all," the full frame, 18 megapixel, 14FPS still shooter brings a lot of new features to the table as a still camera (gigabit Ethernet, dual CF cards, increased ISO range) and the first significant video updates to Canon's HDSLR line since the 5D and 7D era. The 1D X records at the same 1080p frame rates as previous Canon HDSLRs, but offers new compression options including an intraframe codec, reduced moire, timecode embedding, longer single take time of 30 minutes, and adjustable (during a take) manual audio levels. This is all thanks to Dual DIGIC 5+ image and data processors (all HDSLRs since the Canon 5D Mark II have been based on the DIGIC 4). The 1D X will ship in March for $6,800, after which we can assume (and hope) that the DIGIC 5 features will migrate down to lower-end HDSLRs. First, let's take a look at the video part of the 1D X press release:

Centered around an all-new full-frame CMOS sensor with larger pixels than those found on the EOS 5D Mark II image sensor, the EOS-1D X utilizes new HD video formats to simplify and speed up post-production work. The two new compression formats offered on the EOS-1D X include intraframe (ALL-i ) compression for an editing-friendly format and interframe (IPB) compression for superior data compression, giving professionals the options they need for their ideal workflow. Answering the requests of cinematographers and filmmakers, the EOS-1D X includes two methods of SMPTE-compliant timecode embedding, Rec Run and Free Run, allowing multiple cameras or separate sound recording to be synced together in post production.

Canon’s all new full-frame CMOS sensor ensures that video footage captured on the EOS-1D X will exhibit less moiré than any previous Canon model, resulting in a significant improvement in HD video quality. A desired feature for many documentary filmmakers using Canon DSLRs was to enable recording beyond the four gigabyte (GB) file capacity and the EOS-1D X is the answer. The new camera features automatic splitting of movie files when a single file exceeds 4GB. The new file splitting function allows for continuous video recording up to 29 minutes and 59 seconds across multiple 4GB files; no frames are dropped and the multiple files can be seamlessly connected in post production, providing filmmakers the recording time they want in the same convenient DSLR form factor. The camera records Full HD at 1920 x 1080 in selectable frame rates of 24p (23.976), 25p, or 30p (29.97); and 720p HD or SD video recording at either 50p or 60p (59.94). SD video can be recorded in either NTSC or PAL standards.

Moire is reportedly virtually gone according to planet5D, and jello is apparently vastly improved, as is the camera's low-light performance. No word yet on the datarate of the new codec options. The LCD screen is not articulating, but the HDMI output apparently does not downres during recording (which is a good thing for anyone thinking of using an external recorder). The camera's only high-speed recording option is 60P at 720P resolution. So far the only promo videos I've seen are below:

While there is nothing incredibly revolutionary here, Canon seems to have addressed the most glaring issues of working with video on their HDSLRs, and presumably their best is yet to come for the video features that filmmakers are most interested in. We'll see on November 3rd.

In a brief overview at DP Review, Canon's Chuck Westfall discusses the camera's drop in resolution as a decision made to help with noise levels and low light ability:

There's a couple of things that we consider when we think about IQ: number one on this sensor is noise. It's clear the noise level is better than in the 1D Mk IV or the 1DS III. The pixel size is larger than in the 1DS III or 5D Mark II (6.95 microns, versus 6.4) and the difference is even more striking compared to the 5.7 micron pixels in the 1D Mark IV. That helps us in terms of light capturing ability and increases the signal to noise ratio. In turn, that does nothing but help the dynamic range of the camera.

There's some more info on the compression options (though no bitrate details other than the intraframe codec is a datarate three times higher than the GOP option) as well as the timecode options (rec run and free run options) on page 8 here.

The full press release is below. The 1D X is undeniably the DSLR to beat -- if you account for both video and still specs -- but unless you're going to be shooting a lot of stills, I suspect for filmmakers $6,800 would be better spent on a proper video camera like a Sony FS100. However, if you make your living doing both, this looks to be the new king of the HDSLR heap.

Canon U.S.A. Introduces The New Canon EOS-1D X Digital SLR Camera, Re-Designed From The Inside Out

Featuring a Completely New 61-Point Autofocus, Fast Shooting up to 12 fps, 18-Megapixel Full-Frame CMOS Sensor, Full HD Video Recording and Much More

LAKE SUCCESS, N.Y., October 18, 2011 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging, is proud to introduce a completely revolutionized EOS-1D series camera, the Canon EOS-1D X Digital SLR camera. As the new leader in Canon's arsenal of professional DSLRs, the EOS-1D X will be a high-speed multimedia juggernaut replacing both the EOS-1Ds Mark III and EOS-1D Mark IV models in Canon's lineup. Enhancing the revolutionary image quality of the EOS-1Ds and speed capabilities of the EOS-1D series, the EOS-1D X DSLR features an 18-megapixel full-frame Canon CMOS sensor, Dual DIGIC 5+ Imaging Processors, 14-bit A/D data conversion and capable of shooting an incredible 12 frames-per-second (fps). Canon's EOS DSLR cameras and accessories have a long-standing legacy of providing high-quality results to professionals in a wide range of markets, including sports, nature, cinematography, wedding and commercial studios. The addition of this new model will help take this tradition to a whole new level.

The EOS-1D X announcement comes on the heels of Canon's recent manufacturing milestone with the production of the Company's 50-millionth EOS-series SLR camera in September of 2011. Furthermore, Canon will achieve yet another milestone at the end of this month producing the 70-millionth EF lens.

"The EOS-1D X represents the re-invention of the EOS-1Ds and EOS-1D series, combining new proprietary Canon technologies with the culmination of customer feedback and requests from the field. We are proud to introduce this camera to the worldwide community of professional photographers and cinematographers with the features and capabilities they need to capture the great moments that display their talent," stated Yuichi Ishizuka, executive vice president and general manager, Imaging Technologies and Communications Group, Canon U.S.A.

The Camera With Three Brains

The EOS-1D X features three DIGIC processors, including Dual DIGIC 5+ image processors capable of delivering approximately 17 times more processing speed than DIGIC 4, and a dedicated DIGIC 4 for metering and AF control. In conjunction with the newly developed high-performance 18-megapixel full-frame Canon CMOS image sensor, the Dual DIGIC 5+ processors provide high-speed continuous shooting, lower noise, and a significant increase in data processing speed than previous EOS-1D models. This new level of data processing speed allows the EOS-1D X to perform many functions including chromatic aberration correction for various Canon EF lenses in-camera instead of through post-production software. The DIGIC 4 processor utilizes a new 100,000-pixel RGB Metering Sensor for enhanced exposure accuracy with color and face detection, and works together with the camera's new EOS iTR (Intelligent Tracking and Recognition) AF.

The EOS-1D X employs a completely new imaging sensor, producing the lowest noise of any EOS digital camera to date for stunning portraiture and studio work. The new 18-megapixel full-frame CMOS sensor utilizes large pixels - 1.25 microns larger than those in the EOS-1D Mark IV sensor and .55 microns larger than those in the EOS 5D Mark II sensor - together with gapless microlenses to achieve enhanced light gathering efficiency, higher sensitivity and less noise at the pixel level. The new sensor has improved on the already very high signal-to-noise ratio of sensor output of earlier EOS models for outstanding image quality, even in extremely low light. When combined with the Dual DIGIC 5+ imaging processors the results are stunning. The images produced with the EOS-1D X camera's new sensor are so clean that files can easily be up-sized if necessary for even the most demanding high-resolution commercial applications. The EOS-1D X will also feature new Ultrasonic Wave Motion Cleaning (UWMC), Canon's second generation self-cleaning sensor unit, which utilizes carrier wave technology to remove smaller dust particles from the sensor and it includes a new fluorine coating on the infrared absorption glass to help repel dust.

The low-light capability of the EOS-1D X is evident in its incredible ISO range and ability to photograph in extremely low-light conditions. Adjustable from ISO 100 to 51,200 within its standard range, the new model offers a low ISO 50 setting for studio and landscape photography and two high settings of 102,400 at H1 and 204,800 at H2, ideal for law enforcement, government or forensic field applications.

New 61-Point High Density Reticular AF

The EOS-1D X includes a brand new 61-Point High Density Reticular AF, the most sophisticated DSLR AF system Canon has ever released. The 21 focusing points in the central area are standard precision cross-type and effective with maximum apertures as small as f/5.6, depending on the lens in use. The center five points are also high-precision diagonal cross-type points for maximum apertures as small as f/2.8. All 61 points are sensitive to horizontal contrast with maximum apertures as small as f/5.6 and 20 of the outer focusing points function as cross-type points with maximum apertures as small as f/4.0. Other innovations of the new 61-point High Density Reticular AF include expanded AF coverage area, superior focusing precision and low light sensitivity, and greater low-contrast subject detection capability compared to earlier EOS AF systems. (See image below for AF point configuration)

AF point configuration

All AF functions now have their own menu tab for quick and easy access (formerly AF custom functions in previous EOS models). A new AF Configuration Tool allows for customized setting of tracking sensitivity, the acceleration and deceleration of tracking subjects, and AF point auto switching, all of which are easily accessed and adjusted via the new AF menu tab. A built-in Feature Guide advises photographers on which settings to use according to subject matter.

Similar to the AF point selection options offered in the EOS 7D Digital SLR camera, the EOS-1D X offers six AF point selection modes: Spot, Single Point, Single Point with surrounding four points, Single Point with surrounding eight points, Zone selection and Automatic AF point selection. (See image below AF point selection options.)

AF point selection options

EOS iTR AF: Intelligent Tracking and Recognition Enhances AF Performance

The Canon EOS-1D X features incredible new EOS iTR (Intelligent Tracking and Recognition) AF options ideal for wedding and event photography as well as sports and photojournalism. The default AF mode for the EOS-1D X uses phase detection AF information, while a new second option uses Face Detection technology to track recognized faces in addition to color information, ideal when shooting events such as tennis or dancing where facial recognition of the original subject will help keep that person in focus throughout the scene.

Exposure Control

For the first time in a Canon DSLR camera, a DIGIC processor is used exclusively with the metering sensor for fast, accurate exposure control. The Canon DIGIC 4 processor takes advantage of the EOS-1D X's 100,000-pixel RGB Metering Sensor and utilizes 252 zones for general metering or 35 zones for low-light metering to help ensure accurate evaluative ambient or flash exposure. The new subject recognition capabilities enhance nearly all of the camera's automatic functions, helping to adjust exposure, autofocus, Auto Lighting Optimizer and Automatic Picture Style to the scene being captured for enhanced image quality.

Multiple Exposure Modes

The EOS-1D X is the first EOS Digital SLR to feature Multiple Exposure capability. The camera can combine up to nine individual images into a single composite image, with no need for post-processing in a computer. Four different compositing methods are provided for maximum creative control, including Additive, Average, Bright and Dark. Compositing results can be viewed in real time on the camera's LCD monitor, and there is a one-step Undo command that allows photographers to delete an image and try again if desired. The EOS-1D X's Multiple Exposure mode even allows photographers to specify a previously captured RAW image as the starting point for a new Multiple Exposure composite image.

Super High Speed Mode

The Canon EOS-1D X camera breaks new ground in the world of digital SLRs, offering a Super High Speed Mode which increases shooting speeds up to 14 fps at full 18-megapixel resolution in JPEG modei. The new camera is also capable of shooting RAW, JPEG, or RAW+JPEG at speeds up to 12 fps in One Shot AF or AI Servo AF for enhanced performance in sports photography and other applications requiring high-speed digital capture. This new level of performance is made possible by the combination of the EOS-1D X's 16-channel readout CMOS sensor, Dual DIGIC 5+ image processors, and a completely new reflex mirror mechanism that has been engineered by Canon to combine high-performance with exceptional precision and reliability.

Enhanced EOS HD Video - New Compressions, Longer Recording

Centered around an all-new full-frame CMOS sensor with larger pixels than those found on the EOS 5D Mark II image sensor, the EOS-1D X utilizes new HD video formats to simplify and speed up post-production work. The two new compression formats offered on the EOS-1D X include intraframe (ALL-i ) compression for an editing-friendly format and interframe (IPB) compression for superior data compression, giving professionals the options they need for their ideal workflow. Answering the requests of cinematographers and filmmakers, the EOS-1D X includes two methods of SMPTE-compliant timecode embedding, Rec Run and Free Run, allowing multiple cameras or separate sound recording to be synced together in post production.

Canon's all new full-frame CMOS sensor ensures that video footage captured on the EOS-1D X will exhibit less moiré than any previous Canon model, resulting in a significant improvement in HD video quality. A desired feature for many documentary filmmakers using Canon DSLRs was to enable recording beyond the four gigabyte (GB) file capacity and the EOS-1D X is the answer. The new camera features automatic splitting of movie files when a single file exceeds 4GB. The new file splitting function allows for continuous video recording up to 29 minutes and 59 seconds across multiple 4GB files; no frames are dropped and the multiple files can be seamlessly connected in post production, providing filmmakers the recording time they want in the same convenient DSLR form factor. The camera records Full HD at 1920 x 1080 in selectable frame rates of 24p (23.976), 25p, or 30p (29.97); and 720p HD or SD video recording at either 50p or 60p (59.94). SD video can be recorded in either NTSC or PAL standards.

The Canon EOS-1D X also includes manual audio level control, adjustable both before and during movie recording, an automatic setting, or it can be turned off entirely. A wind filter is also included. Sound can be recorded either through the internal monaural microphone or via an optional external microphone through the stereo mic input.

Enhanced Ergonomics & Optimized Design

Photographers familiar with Canon's EOS 1D-series of cameras will notice the control configuration of the EOS-1D X takes a different approach to button placement. The re-designed exterior and ergonomic button configuration feels comfortable in your right hand, allowing seamless navigation through menu options.The Live View Button has been conveniently placed near the user's thumb for one-touch switching between Live View and Viewfinder shooting. The Quick Control Button and menu navigation controls will allow users to change camera settings using only their right hand, for fast, simple one-handed control using their thumb on the scroll wheel. The new multi-controller is positioned by the right hand thumb when the camera is held for vertical shooting and enables the same level of control to camera operators when shooting vertically as they have when shooting horizontally. On the front of the camera are four user assignable function buttons, two for vertical shooting and two for horizontal shooting, allowing customizable button control when shooting in either position. The camera also features a level of weather resistance equivalent to earlier professional models such as the EOS-1D Mark IV.

Canon has answered the request of many professional EOS photographers and incorporated Dual Card Slots into the new EOS-1D X DSLR camera. The dual CF card slots will allow photographers to carry only one memory card format and still achieve instant image back-ups and enhanced storage capacity.

This camera also features a new shutter design with even greater durability and precision. Rated to 400,000 cycles, the new carbon fiber shutter blades are more lightweight and durable, allowing the EOS-1D X to achieve over 100,000 cycles more than the shutter of the EOS-1D Mark IV. A new shutter motion and new motor help further reduce vibration in the camera. The EOS-1D X also features an electronic first curtain, new to the EOS-1D series DSLRs, for minimal in-camera vibration during image capture.

Connectivity

For professional photographers who prefer a wired workflow and transfer system, Canon has included a built-in LAN connection in the EOS-1D X DSLR. The built-in LAN connection features a gigabit Ethernet Jack capable of 1000BASE-T transmission speeds, offering photographers a stable wired connection for ultra-fast data transmission. If the network were to go down, the camera will attempt to resend images until the files are sent. The EOS-1D X also features a direct image transfer function whereby images can be selected for transfer, and only sent once a LAN or USB connection is established.

Accessories

Designed exclusively for the EOS-1D X, the new Canon WFT-E6A Wireless File Transmitter features wireless LAN support for 802.11n network transfer rates providing users with increased communication speed when compared to previous models. With this new dust and weather resistant model, professionals can synchronize clocks on multiple cameras and use the unit to support linked shooting when utilizing multiple cameras. In addition, Bluetooth-compatible equipment can be easily linked to the device as well.

The EOS-1D X also offers an optional Canon GP-E1 GPS Receiver, which can be easily integrated into the camera's body. Powered by the camera, this GPS receiver provides the same weatherproof resistance as the EOS-1D X, even at the connector. With an electronic compass on-board, the GP-E1 will log movement - latitude, longitude, elevation, and the Universal Time Code - and allow viewing of camera movement on a PC after shooting. The receiver will also record camera direction when shooting, even when shooting vertically.

Pricing and Availability

The Canon EOS-1D X Digital SLR camera is scheduled for March 2012 availability and will be sold in a body-only configuration at an estimated retail price of $6,800.00. The compact, lightweight WFT-E6A Wireless File Transmitter is scheduled to be available in March 2012 and have an estimated retail price of $600. Availability for the GP-E1 GPS receiver is expected in April 2012 with an estimated retail price of $300.

Your Comment

27 Comments

Should have upped the Pixels a bit, but not bad. I'll definitely keep my eyes open. May get a 1D after all.

October 18, 2011

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I'm a little disappointed there's no 1080p 50fps (or 60). If this is the highier end DSLR, how much chance to we have to see this feature on the lower models?
Manual audio during recording and the moire/jello news is awesome though !
I suppose it is a photograhy camera after all, for the same price, might aswekk be looking at the Sony FS100 for video...

October 18, 2011

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Yeah no 1080p 50/60 for that price is really a deal breaker as far as Im concerned. I do shoot stills and motion which is why I believe in the DSMC system of RED - only I dont have $35k for an Epic...so crossing my fingers Nov 3 brings something special from them.

October 18, 2011

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Paul

I was also disappointed by the lack of 1080p60, but maybe it's not possible to read such a big sensor that fast, so I wouldn't rule it out for APS-C models; also, if downsampling is done properly (no aliasing/moire, and sharper image in general), 720p60 may be useful this time

no word on color subsampling, but I'd expect those new codecs to be 4:2:2, right?

my wish list for the new generation was:
* no moire/aliasing
* 422 with a lot less codec noise
* ISO 3200 with noise level of current ISO 800
* 1080p60

so I guess I should be happy... except for the price!! this model is too expensive for most, now we need to see the lower end models (although this one won't be available until march, and I woudn't expect any other model with the new video features -apart from the nov3 thing- to ship before that)

October 18, 2011

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reading these specs for this supposed mother-of-all-dslrs, i feel like this camera should be able to do more. dual digic V processors? please, you can handle 1080/60. maybe not at maxed out bitrate, but still, cmon canon.

these cameras are getting so powerful in terms of raw computing power, but whats the point if the feautres are all set in stone, at some arbitrary specification? with all the panny hacks going on, i can't help but wonder what this beast of a camera could do if it was hacked!

which begs the question... why don't camera manufactures go in with the intention of 3rd party "hacks" giving the camera its functionality? seems this open source approach would appease more people, as the real features would come at the software level. like the countless ptool variations, the features would be customizable, and not rigidly imposed by the manufacturer.

cameras don't have to be so proprietary anymore. they're basically just computers. and its not like intel develops their own software... just a thought

October 18, 2011

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dave

I don't think it is a processing power problem, or a "set in stone" problem: it is the sensor that is not able to work that fast: in the fast drive stills mode with mirror lockup and digital shutter, all it can take is 14 jpg images per second at full resolution; so there must be some in-sensor binning or something (they said no line skipping) that can't work at 60Hz unless you further reduce resolution (just a guess)

October 18, 2011

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I think most on here missed the headline in this camera which is the intra codec. What is extraordinary is that this camera is doing 350+ mbit per second, much higher than most external recorders (except uncompressed ones) that do 220 Prores HQ. If you add all the other features like reduced moire aliasing etc that camera will be a beast. Now lets hope that this tech migrate below.

October 18, 2011

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Daniel

There is no indication that the bit rate won't be capped on the intraframe recording, it may be some sort of canon version AVC-intra 50 or something. However I do agree, this is huge. Koo suggests that for the price the FS100 may be more appealing, but I really think this blows that out of the water based on the in-camera intraframe codec and the canon lens options you would have alone.

October 18, 2011

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MRH

they said it can only record 6 minutes of highest-quality intra footage on a 16GB card, which means 364 Mbps; it may be an error or a misquote, because that sounds insane (AVC-intra 100 can do 10 bit 1080p 4:2:2 in "only" 100 Mbps)

October 18, 2011

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Where did you read that? Link, please?

October 18, 2011

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Kim

Still looking for that codec spec myself....

October 18, 2011

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avatar
Ryan Koo
Founder
Writer/Director

It is in the Dpreview article on the 1 DX where they quote the Canon chief marketing guy (I forgot his name).

October 18, 2011

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Daniel

The link is here http://www.dpreview.com/articles/5149972341/canon-eos-1d-x-overview in the paragraph " In the frame to be flagship "

October 18, 2011

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Daniel

where Daniel said
"The 1D X offers two compression options, including 'All-I,' a very low compression format that offers high image quality and editability but at the cost of immense files (a 16Gb card will hold around 6 minutes of footage). "

October 19, 2011

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For $6,800 Who cares what the bit rate from the codec is, With a hyperdeck shuttle af100 and fs100 will give you higher quality for cheaper unless the new 1d is 10 bit rather than 8 bit. Also is it 4:2:0 still or 4:2:2?

October 18, 2011

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Ryan Emanuel

October 18, 2011

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Rocket100

WOW!!! The ISO's used in the videos and stills are INSANE - no noise at all!! Could it be that the FS100 has been KO'd in terms of low light? Id like to see more but it looks very promising.

October 18, 2011

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Paul

Sorry if this has been mentioned before but those trying to guess what Canon will announce next month should check out this post from April about Canon's new PL mount lenses. Seems like Koo had it figured out many months ago!

October 18, 2011

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Jackson Childs

October 18, 2011

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Jackson Childs

I know it's simple but I still want a headphone jack on one of these DSLR's!

October 18, 2011

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Darius13

We all want these picture cameras to be video cameras soooooo bad. lol. It's still a picture camera.

October 18, 2011

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What does the 6,800 price tag mean for nov 3? If their 1d camera is 7 grand then you can speculate that their 4k cinema camera will be in the 15,000-20,000 range, maybe even more, especially if the limited added features of the 1d make up for a 4,300 price difference between that and the 5d. People hoping for a 10k cinema camera may not like what they learn on the 3rd

October 18, 2011

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Ryan Emanuel

ok, so we have two different bits of information regarding codec and bitrate:
* first, dpreview said: "a 16Gb card will hold around 6 minutes of footage" which means 350Mbps
http://www.dpreview.com/articles/5149972341/canon-eos-1d-x-overview
* now, canon professional network says: "When filming with ALL-I, file sizes will be around three times larger than with IPB"
http://wideopencamera.com/just-the-cut/canon-1d-x-what-the-compression/
only one way to make those match: in the dpreview thing 16Gb actually means gigabits, IPB is 17Mbps, and all-I is 50Mbps
but who uses gigabits to talk about SD card capacity? and who is still using 2GB cards?
if this is right, it means 8 bit, and probably 4:2:0 too
let's wait and see, but it could be very disappointing

October 19, 2011

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The Canon folks get there sensors from Sony, so I'm told. If that is incorrect, someone please let me know.

Sony also makes the sensor for the D3S Nikon, which I bought after it first came out for low-light imagery, landscape and clubs venues.

That sensor seems to have been a chased as a model for the new Canon, IE. photo sites larger etc or, the sensor R & D is a third party, party and camera makers are in the downstream pipeline regardless.

It was simply a matter of time.

It will be interesting to see what Nikon does in future to "answer" Canon.

Telling as ever, that pissing contest.

My friend who shoots video on assignment all over the world just bought the FS100 for his free lance video, (The client he shoots, will be using RED for everything going forward) his contention is that going with the new (next) Sony HDslr, will allow him the latitude for photography with lenses which are cross purposed.

He has sold his 7D, and is hanging onto his 5D until the new Sony hits. He's also sold his Nikon lenses.

I shoot video on the D7000 which, for field docs and interviews, is an very fine camera. Even with SDHC cards, given the cost upfront of these tools, the Fader ND's, mattes, FF and so on and the dozen or so f2.8 and below primes, AI's and AF's I already own, it's a pretty powerful machine for the time being.

Plus the D3S at 12MP is already in the locker at $5,200 US, so chasing the "next big thing" from either isn't an option. It is NOT the choice for video, at .mov per se but, the look for landscapes at 12MP is very Kodak like, and moving to a higher density for fine art and media can introduce challenges in technique, so for now the pixel peep show is moot.

That's not to say I wouldn't upgrade, but for imagery, there is no need, and up until the Canon's release, even the Canon sales folks at my camera retailer, agree that the D3S is the best for the money.

As ever, and once again, while checking out a scanner the other day for old 1950's negatives, a user was in the store, asking if the clerk had the adapter he could use on his 5D, to mount Nikon glass.

The advancements for Canon are to be applauded, however, given that that FS100 he was bench testing for ISO at his place, grey card, led wash and a Sekonic, will capture video at obscene ISO's, I can see his point about selling his Canon and Nikon gear, and Koo's admonition about the Sony mentioned above.

Just 'sayin.

October 22, 2011

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Canon make their own sensors. Nikon's are by Sony.

October 24, 2011

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Pippy

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5
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