April 14, 2014

Storytelling in an 'A.D.D. Culture': How to Capture Your Audience's Divided Attention

Gary VaynerchukWhat is at the core of filmmaking? It's the same thing that made us want to pick up a camera in the first place. Storytelling. But, as things tend to do, the landscape of media consumption has evolved to match our changing needs and desires. Platforms like Twitter, YouTube, and Netflix have sprung up to accommodate this change, but have the ways we tell stories followed suit? Gary Vaynerchuck doesn't seem to think so. In this 99U talk, the best-selling author and founder of VaynerMedia describes how to be better storytellers in today's "A.D.D. Culture."

Though Vaynerchuck's reference to storytelling encompasses everything from tweets to feature films, his message is an intriguing one -- one that all filmmakers could certainly learn from. He explains that storytellers need to be aware of how their audience is changing. We live in a time where we can consume media how we want, when we want, and where we want, and so grabbing and/or keeping one's attention isn't as easy as putting yourself in front of their face.

For indie filmmakers, the very thing that gave our films a fighting chance to be seen, direct distribution, has actually helped facilitate the over-saturation of the industry. How do filmmakers make their mark and carve out their own fanbase when there are over 6 billion hours of video on YouTube with 100 hours more hours being uploaded every minute?

"I feel that the far majority of people -- all across the board are storytelling like it's 2007 in a 2014 world."

Vaynerchuck offers some ideas on how to better tell your story, namely if that story is the one you tell your potential audience about why they should check out your creative content. A major theme he touches on, and one that was particularly interesting to me, was this idea that the context in which a "story" is told is just as important as the content. The "stories" we tell on Facebook are different than the ones we tell on Twitter, Vine, Kickstarter, or Instagram. (I admit, the videos I share on YouTube are completely different than the ones I share on Vimeo.) Different platforms will inherently bear different contexts for storytelling.

Check out the video below:

What are your thoughts on what Vaynerchuck talked about? Considering the rate at which content is made and shared, as well as our ever-shrinking attention spans, how can indie filmmakers better reach current/future audiences? Join the discussion in the comments below.

[via 99U & Filmmaker IQ]

Your Comment

52 Comments

I'm pissed off right now.. I wanted to watch this but there's no sound! Am I the only one having trouble? Is there another link? Thanks!

April 14, 2014 at 6:59PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Christine

Really great video. Very highly recommended!

April 14, 2014 at 7:16PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I thought the hard part was making the movie but it was just a straight creative endeavor. I just kept working on it and it got done (www.spacetruckerbruce.com). I thought I could put it up on VOD, advertise and get people to rent it. I'm finding that this is not true. I get the ad in front of thousands then a few hundred click on the link, then about a hundred click on the preview but nobody rents the movie. I have a good preview, and the movie is only $1.99. Like this article says, the content may not be right for the context. A 90 minute movie that costs $1.99 is not what the internet users want. They want free, funny videos lasting 3 or 4 minutes. It's a bit depressing for someone who wants to make full length movies. Maybe there's a trick to it. Is there?

April 14, 2014 at 7:20PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I think that the trick to self distribution is that you need to personally be able to sell your film to people, ads are great but then the audience has to weigh it in, I'd say a $2.99 buy is better than a $1.99 rental since it would give me the ability to watch the movie on my T.V. or on a trainride home (I tend to watch 2-3 movies per day)

Some of the most interesting films I've seen have been independent low budget movies. The problem that I find is that I can't find them as easily, what helps greatly is if you get yourself festival exposure (even in small festivals).

Even if you lose money through a cheaper distribution method, you'll win in the end as potentially more people are exposed to your storytelling methods.

Bellflower (a Sundance 2012 selection, South By Southwest, etc.) was a $17,000 budgeted movie - the company who made it just got their funding ($120,000 with a $60,000 goal) for their second film. I would have never heard of it if not for it being selected at Sundance.

April 14, 2014 at 8:18PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Dustin

Dustin, I like your marketing ideas. Would vimeo on demand sale for 2.99 work for your train ride? would another service like VHX be better? I may lower the purchase price but I need to get the delivery method right. Thanks for your comments.

April 15, 2014 at 2:10PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I was intrigued by the title of your movie as I enjoyed the Dennis Hopper Space Trucker movie back in the day. I checked out your trailer. I have to say its a very long and slow paced teaser that seems to give away most of the plot, it also shows some very cardboard looking sets which might be the aesthetic you are going for but it put me off as a sci fi fan. It felt very generic, like an episode of mst3k but without the zaniness. After watching the trailer I felt I had seen it all and didn't need to rent it. I'd suggest recutting the trailer to a 60sec version and choosing only the highest production value shots. Sketch out the plot but remove the details, leave the audience wanting to know more (and therefore wanting to rent the film). I would consider myself to be an ideal audience for your film as I like comedies and love sci fi, but the trailer turned me off and I'm sure I'm not the only one. :(

April 16, 2014 at 3:39AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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John

Reading my reply again it sounds more harsh than I meant it to. I'm definitely interested in hearing more about your experience with selling/renting your film online. It's something I plan to do myself and I'm curious what sort of numbers you are seeing with your sales. I've sent you a PM on Vimeo.

April 16, 2014 at 7:57AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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John

Good comments John! Perhaps cutting a good catchy trailer is something that a lot of indie filmmakers need help with. I'll try to improve it. Thanks!

April 16, 2014 at 1:37PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Selling a movie for $1.99 sends the signal that it's not worth very much. If something is worth seeing or hearing it's worth paying for.

September 22, 2015 at 5:34AM, Edited September 22, 5:34AM

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I agree with the other comments. Your trailer was long and didn't leave me wanting more. Well, it did, but I felt I had a very good understanding of what to expect. Leave some cardboard bits in the preview, though. You have better production quality than Hick Trek... and I own that on DVD. I'm working on a film, www.RocketsInSpace.com, that won't be using cardboard, but it's pretty close!

I plan to rent your movie (or buy) during one of the visits from my brother. Looks like the kind of movie we'd enjoy.

Is there another movie in your future? Do we have to wait another 6 years?

September 22, 2015 at 3:14PM

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Ethan
Producer/Writer/Director/Prop Maker
113

A storyteller needs to contemplate long enough, everyday, and for it to qualify as time well spent, he must remain inclusive with the people he meets in the tangible world. It will sadly be at the expense of his social media awareness and produce results that are bereft of the mass-conscience sheen, but y'know, the more y'know the less y'know. I think the 99% perspiration genius-claim was interesting, but a storyteller knows the art of applying his ass to the seat and doesn't sweat so much as revel at the fact he will be done with it someday. In the meantime, he sits. So thank you for the reality check, sir, but I won't be in a hurry to shove it down people's throat.

April 14, 2014 at 8:47PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Le Rouzès

This was like some weird indoctrination speech for marketers. This guy co-opted the word storytelling for its poetic implications instead of using the word he really means, advertising. He's right about context but the overall purpose of this video was to teach people to be better salespeople. This guy just did it with word play and computer speak.

April 14, 2014 at 9:10PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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saraG

It might be a hard pill to swallow, but indie filmmakers are going to have to learn how to be salespeople in order to find their audience. Many already do this (and have been for some time). As VOD and crowdfunding grows, the middlemen start getting cut out, and it'll be up to us to know how to best package our films in order to get the highest return…whether that means a larger fanbase or profits.

Ted Hope talks a lot about this: http://nofilmschool.com/2013/06/learn-to-be-entrepreneurial-filmmaker-ti...

April 14, 2014 at 9:31PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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V Renée
Nights & Weekends Editor
Writer/Director

sorry but this is shite! He is a marketer! Yes...it is true the that we as filmmakers have to be better at marketing their films and themselves but that does not mean that our films have to be sound bites!

A good story is a good because of character and conflict (not the runtime!) and sometimes character and conflict takes time to setup.

April 14, 2014 at 9:58PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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RickyG

I think you missed the point. He's not referring to "storytelling" in terms of a feature film narrative (in fact, he says that in the video). He's referring to a wider concept of "storytelling", the story you tell when you market your creative content.

I'd say his advice is great for when you're advertising your film. How you go about doing that should differ based on the platform you're doing it on. The approach you use on Twitter may not translate to Facebook, Kickstarter, or Vine. Pay attention to context, not just content -- that was the main point.

April 14, 2014 at 10:41PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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V Renée
Nights & Weekends Editor
Writer/Director

I understand what you mean, still if your content's any good shouldn't it be able to breath by itself? Some say content and context is a 50/50 thing. It's funny cause the guy seemed to have content, but the context in which he used his storytelling chops seemed douchey to me.

April 15, 2014 at 11:50AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Le Rouzès

Le Rouzès - The internet is unfortunately not a meritocracy. The cream does not always rise to the top. The internet is about awareness and human sharability ( virality? ). Because of this, I would say marketing is even MORE than 50% of the pie. You have to have good content, otherwise no one cares. But you also have to create awareness and interest in the content...otherwise it's a tree falling in the forest with no one around.

April 15, 2014 at 5:40PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Joe

Exactly. Why does Hollywood pay tons of money for a famous name/s when they already spend millions on making the movie? To sell it, unfortunately, great acting, big sets, compelling stories, even beautiful images aren't enough to sell a movie to the public. (sadly). A studio can make a 400,000 flop easier than it can a blockbuster. It's all a sales pitch, well most of it anyway. Even the actors are trying to sell us on their performance.

April 15, 2014 at 12:16AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Anthony Marino

I guess you've never googled "how to tell a good story". Because most of the results are not about writing screenplays or novels but rather business and marketing.

The guy didn't co-opt the word storytelling; you've restricted what the word means in other contexts.

April 17, 2014 at 11:40AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Very true. exactly my thoughts.

April 18, 2014 at 3:33AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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LArry

Marketing IS storytelling, people. The term isn't exclusive to filmmaking and screenwriting practices. This is probably on of the best videos I've seen you guys post and I'm very happy that you did. I came in very pessimistic and walked away enlightened!

Even retweeted it: https://twitter.com/KahL_One

April 14, 2014 at 10:46PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Oh god

April 14, 2014 at 11:03PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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saraG

The idea that long form content doesn't work online is bullshit. Isn't web traffic like 80% netflix? Also, I can't take this style of presentation seriously since seeing Silicon Valley.

April 14, 2014 at 11:32PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Frank

Also also, I love how proud a 40 year old "social media expert" feels when he figures out something that any 14 year old could have told you.

April 14, 2014 at 11:44PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Frank

Netflix is a subscription based service. By default most people will invest more time into it more than they would from a Youtube or Vimeo hosted film. He isn't talking about sub-based services at all, he's talking about general web video content distribution. The type of distribution we all use to promote our films.

Netflix is a part of that, but that isn't its platform. So this is a moot point.

April 15, 2014 at 12:08AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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*isn't

April 15, 2014 at 12:08AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Politely, I'm struggling to see why this post would rouse so much frustration? He specifically cites marathoning television seasons as a modern commonality. Respectfully, there's no reason to take this piece out of context and turn it into an attack on long form. That is never made an issue.

How frequently do you see films, television shows, or any other long form piece without first being engaged by a trailer, a poster image, a social media post, or some combination therein? That's the important understanding to be gleaned from this lecture. We know what generation we live in, but trying to fit OUR work into it is a whole other matter.

For years, filmmakers have hoped for the chance to take ownership of their work and be truly independent. Now that the tools are materializing, why be so resistant? To be autonomous, one will always have to embrace SOME degree of business practice, and grasp developments in the modern media landscape.

We're on the precipice of that massive transition to autonomy, and Vaynerchuck's input can serve to push our work forward. If you're an artist, you've likely been trained from an early age to accept: information like this doesn't concern you, should not interest you, or may even be the antithesis to what you represent. Now, it's geared directly to empowering you. You don't have to agree with everything he says, but there is certainly contextual value.

April 15, 2014 at 12:53PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I agree. Well said.

April 15, 2014 at 1:37PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Mitch

Very well said!

April 16, 2014 at 3:08PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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sean

I found the video very informative. If many corporations, entrepreneurs, filmmakers, etc. focus attention and effort in spaces where audiences are not presently at, they surly won't achieve commerical success. To some extent, even the studios get this. They may not effectively utilize social media, but, they are laser focused on the Chinese market. That's where the theatrical eyeballs are. Irrespective, I appreciate Vaynerchuck's point of view, and I think it suggests we rethink how we approach narrative storytelling (not just how we market and distribute a film). The ADD like social media viewer, described in the video, is me. I have no patience online and I have little tolerance for nonsensical, beat around the bush advertising (direct or indirect). But, on the other hand, if someone captures my attention with quick, interesting story lines, and an honest request for my business, I tend to support them. What if our narrative features did the same thing? It's definitely something I'm going to give some thought to.

April 15, 2014 at 1:35PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Mitch

Definitely. If I could hit the "Like" button, I would.

April 15, 2014 at 2:00PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Screw that... ADD/ADHD excuses are all about laziness. However, never do something that doesn't have any action, period. As for style, I'm more interested in 2001's (ala "24", NCIS, etc.) or even the 80s for that matter.

April 15, 2014 at 2:44PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Cal

Am I the only one that feels like they just bought a time-share in Massanutten?

April 15, 2014 at 5:02PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Doug

I found the post and video especially to be great. I really agree with what he says about how we need to change the thinking of social media away from just a distribution method.

There are a lot of people one here ragging on him for being a marketer, but his points are still very valid to our world. These days an independent filmmaker has/gets to wear so many hats when creating content and distributing it. It's not enough anymore to just create good content, because there is SO much great content out there. You have to also sell it yourself! Great post V.

April 15, 2014 at 7:32PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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yes you are right, i agree with your point. these tips are really good for marketing buddies.
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September 22, 2015 at 12:27PM, Edited September 22, 12:28PM

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I think that I do not want to target an audience that can't focus for more than 15 sec; 15 sec is an average span of an average Joe on Youtube. I find it disgusting. Think about it. Would you like to have a conversation with somebody who every 15 sec loses their focus and starts tweeeting or browsing Facebook? I know such people and I simply avoid them. Luckily there are still people out there with whom you can have an interesting and engaging conversation without idiotic interruptions.

How about making movies for the love of it? Screw the profits, distribution and focus on pure art of movie making. Yes, it might be that your creations will never be noticed and you will die with a bunch of movies on your hard disk that nobody wants to watch. However, there is a chance, a fighting chance, that you will make it big if you have talent.

Of course I understand the motivation of the video presented here. It's a very good piece of advice if you want to achieve what this video teaches you to achieve.

April 15, 2014 at 10:23PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Its pretty hard to feed your family with 'for the love of it'. Commerce is an important part of life and I really appreciate the insights in this videos as the audience he talks about is my day job and puts food on my table and a roof over my head. Being successful commercially allows for freedoms creatively on my free time and passion projects that I don't have to be worried about profit.

April 16, 2014 at 9:41AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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AdRath

The traditional distribution swing is gone they say... I don't agree. I know it may seem like success when an indie film hits apple trailers, or a film comes out of Festival Lab, which can help, but isn't the complete measure. The numbers do not lie, no one is seeing or watching these films enough to make indie film matter. There are a few slim choices for narrative filmmakers these days - write a great script that is deemed marketable, and smart. Be the chosen few at large market fests. Example: Duplass Bros are headed for TV? There just isn't a sustainable market for feature filmmaking. When John Sayles newest film plays ten Art House theaters and vanishes; not a good sign of things to come. I mean look at "Only lover left Alive" Jim is essentially mirroring all our sentiment, nostalgia about how it was, and how we think it still can be. He has to write hipster vampires to get a budget? And his first film he did not own the rights to the negative? Its a very similar decline to indie rock music imo. The indie label is pretty much dead, you either go to work for corporations or you build a private audience. Building a private audience is a full time job - everything you touch needs to be gold. I know filmmakers that have films running the top tier festivals then onto VOD; I buy them dinner. The strongholds are the guys that got here first - QT, Wes Anderson, Aronofsky, Pt Anderson, Linklater, James Grey, Nolan, etc etc. America has its independent filmmakers and they make their new films every two years. The rest of us are scattered for Facebok likes and iTunes rentals and low-end Netflix deals.

All this said, I do not believe there are masterpieces laying on closet shelves. So we always have a chance to get in the ring.

April 15, 2014 at 10:59PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Nathan

Well said.

April 16, 2014 at 5:48AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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loved vaynershuck talk... he has been brilliant before and he is brilliant now.
although it is a very good advice on being on context
it does not solve the 'how to sell my film' question.
I think we are really embarking on a time-less culture,
but it doesnot means we are no longer going to care about what we care.
I suppose that a piece of coupon inside my dayly bread
will make website stats wonders, if you are going to promote bread...
cheers from Rio de Janeiro Brazil

April 16, 2014 at 3:25PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Great post. Thanks for sharing this brilliant video. I liked the presentation so much that I wrote my own review. You can have a look at it here: http://www.lafabbricadellarealta.com/2014/09/04/presentation-tips-from-t...

September 5, 2014 at 1:49AM, Edited September 5, 1:49AM

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Thanks for sharing this post. I got inspired by your words, but found that some areas needed more work. I actually worked on my take on "Presentation tips from the pros: Gary Vaynerchuk @garyvee on storytelling" and would love to know what you think about it. Here's the link http://www.lafabbricadellarealta.com/2014/09/04/presentation-tips-from-t...

September 8, 2014 at 3:12PM, Edited September 8, 3:12PM

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Just my two cents. As someone who has read Gary's book (particularly Jab, Jan, Jan, Hook), and talking to a plethora of distributors who work with filmmakers to release their film, many indie filmmakers make the same mistakes.
First you have to build an audience for your film. You do this by giving things away like a short film, one a digital download (NFS uses a free DSLR guide), etc. I use a podcast.
Secondly they don't market their movies right. Instead of building an email list using the above method they just blast it onto social media (particularly twitter).

If you're interested in the topic more I recommend anything by Jason Brubaker. Http://HowToSellYourMovie.com

September 22, 2015 at 8:09AM

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Dave Bullis
Writer/Director/Producer
147

Brilliant and honest wake up call to anyone interested creating content for today's online platforms. The right content for the right context.

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One of the great pleasures the audience has is quickly grasping what you're getting at. They resent you when you rob them of this pleasure.
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