November 10, 2016

Aaron Sorkin's Post-Election Letter to Daughter: 'We'll F*cking Fight'

Aaron Sorkin penned an emotional letter to his daughter after Donald Trump's victory on Wednesday. 

Words never fail Aaron Sorkin. The A Few Good Men, The Social Network and West Wing screenwriter, renowned for his incisive, punchy dialogue and memorable tête-à-têtes, has the ability to express the spectrum of human nature in his writing. Yesterday was no exception.

In a letter to his daughter published by Vanity Fair, Sorkin lamented Donald Trump's election and what he perceives to be its potentially disastrous effects. "I won’t sugarcoat it—this is truly horrible," he wrote to 15-year-old Roxy. "We’ve embarrassed ourselves in front of our children and the world."

Not one to mince his words, Sorkin unleashed a tirade against the president-elect and his supporters, calling Trump a "douche nozzle" and "a thoroughly incompetent pig with dangerous ideas, a serious psychiatric disorder, no knowledge of the world and no curiosity to learn."

As for how he got elected, "abject dumbness was glamorized as being 'the fresh voice of an outsider' who's going to 'shake things up,'" Sorkin wrote. "Did anyone bother to ask how? Is he going to re-arrange the chairs in the Roosevelt Room?"

But, like his screenwriting, Sorkin's letter isn't without a rousing optimism. "America didn’t stop being America last night and we didn’t stop being Americans," Sorkin wrote. "And here’s the thing about Americans: Our darkest days have always—always—been followed by our finest hours." Sorkin goes on to encourage his daughter to "get involved" and "fight injustice anywhere we see it—whether it’s writing a check or rolling up our sleeves." 

"Here’s what we’ll do," he wrote. "We’ll fucking fight. (Roxy, there's a time for this kind of language and it's now.)"

'The West Wing'

Because Sorkin has spent a good portion of his career parsing the vagaries of American democracy, it's not difficult to find unnerving parallels to the current political climate in his work.

In an episode of The West Wing called "The War at Home," Josh, who is interminably anxious about poll numbers, grows frustrated when he receives the latest batch. "Numbers lie all the time," his pollster Joey Lucas tells him. 

In The American President, Democratic president Andrew Shepherd (Michael Douglas) runs for reelection. At one point in the film, he holds a press conference after his opponent, Republication Senator Bob Rumson (Richard Dreyfuss), launches repeated attacks on his reputation. "For the last couple of months, Senator Rumson has suggested that being president of this country was, to a certain extent, about character," Shepherd says. "We have serious problems to solve, and we need serious people to solve them. And whatever your particular problem is, I promise you Bob Rumson is not the least bit interested in solving it. He is interested in two things, and two things only: making you afraid of it, and telling you who's to blame for it. That, ladies and gentlemen, is how you win elections. You gather a group of middle age, middle class, middle-income voters who remember with longing an easier time, and you talk to them about family, and American values and character, and you wave an old photo of the President's girlfriend and you scream about patriotism. You tell them she's to blame for their lot in life. And you go on television and you call her a whore."

In The West Wing's "20 Hours in L.A.," Leo and Hoynes argue about the power of the leader of the free world. "You think the President of the United States can arrange for a 50-50 tie in the Senate?" Leo says.

"I think the President of the United States can do pretty much whatever he wants," Hoynes replies.

Leo's response? "You're wrong."

Sorkin certainly hopes so.       

Featured image: Shutterstock

Your Comment

41 Comments

Aaron Sorkin is too full of fresh premium Sushi & $100 steaks to be thinking straight. You know what - and more power to him. He's a very talented man. Down those $40 cocktails…but don’t you DARE tell the salt-of-the-earth populous how to think (and how to vote).

Also, I'd suggest you keep nofilmschool.com apolitical. I don't...and don't think anyone comes here for their news. You're setting yourself up to loose visitors.

November 10, 2016 at 4:16PM

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Alexander Manning
Director
22

Alexander, there's one great way to stay "apolitical", and that's called CENSORSHIP. It happened many years ago in USA and not so many in my country, Brazil.

I really - I mean REALLY - don't understand how someone that aims to make cinema can tell someone to stay "apolitical". Honestly, LOOK AT CINEMA. It IS 100% political. Even when you think it's not, just like life. Every choice is political.
If you want to know only about technical stuff go read a camera manual.

Silence means consent. Thanks NFS for posting and please post more.

November 10, 2016 at 6:34PM

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Thales Banzai
Director; Screenwriter
152

Alexander, this election went well beyond the bounds of political disagreement. Anyone w/ a passion for moving pictures, story, and characters, let alone one who calls themselves a "Director", should absolutely appreciate the grim reality of what America showed the world with the 2016 presidential election. The origins of story-craft are rooted in tribal/family attempts by elders to teach, educate, and enlighten - for the purpose of both a better today AND tomorrow. Not to tell anyone what to think, but to instill a sense of wonder, new thought, and appreciation of actions.

The USA 2016 election says: to win you need to be a hateful bully.
That message is absolutely unacceptable. Google: " hate crimes after election "

Alexander, I strongly suggest you consider narrative as a tool to improve ALL of humankind.

November 10, 2016 at 8:39PM, Edited November 10, 9:04PM

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Daniel Reed
Hat Collector
1121

So easy to blame someone of being rich, famous and respected to despise their opinion. Bravo.

I won't say like others said that film cannot be apolitical - actually I just said it, but whatever... I think it is true either way - but just think for a moment who Aaron Sorkin is. He is a scriptwriter. He writes A LOT about politics and he gives his own political view.
Aaron Sorkin, as we should be as filmmakers we are, is political. And this article is trying to teach us that we should be political, stay informed about everything and read.

November 11, 2016 at 4:17AM

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I'm very happy with the content that Emily posts, I can only take so much fluff about shower curtain diffusers..
Pick up a history book and see what saying nothing will get you. it's absurd to suggest that artist's should shut their mouths and not touch the scary stuff.

November 11, 2016 at 7:55AM

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Thanks, Scott!

November 11, 2016 at 4:25PM

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Emily Buder
Managing Editor & Head of Community

Thanks for posting

November 10, 2016 at 4:54PM

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How is this article relevant to pushing us further as filmmakers? When we don't get what we want we are supposed to publicly thrash those we don't agree with? Just because he is an amazing screenwriter does not mean you guys need to use this to push a certain political viewpoint or agenda. Really disappointed.

November 10, 2016 at 5:40PM

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"How is this article relevant to pushing us further as filmmakers?"

OMFG! WHAT IS CINEMA FOR YOU?

Please... seriously... go read, study, watch some good movies, learn the history of your country, try to travel the world or at least try to talk to people that have a different opinion than you.

Filmmaking is about these things. IF your not interested, maybe you should work in another area.

November 10, 2016 at 6:42PM

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Thales Banzai
Director; Screenwriter
152

Therefore, whoever does not agree with you is (at best) a dumb!?
I am not sure this is the best way to teach others how to become more open minded.
More seriously, a majority of American movies are not written to make people smarter.
They are often entertaining (which means no intellectual depth) cash makers or powerful geopolitical propaganda tools (America is saving the free world, aggressing foreign countries for democracy) and the letter of this screenwriter is bringing no food to thoughts by just repeating the same widely spread opinion and insults against Trump.
Instead, his letter would be interesting if he were asking for a rethinking of the voting system in US to make it closer to democracy by letting the people to directly elect their President and not going through the actual scheme.
Even with direct election, there is no chances of real democracy in the actual world (except in Switzerland where important decisions are voted by referendum) as to get an opportunity to be elected, you need lots of money for it.
And if you are not as rich as Trump, you need the support of all the Bangster and lobbies that are finally running the country, to their own interest, behind the political scene.

November 11, 2016 at 5:20AM

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Franc Sanka
Director of Photography / Film and Photography Teacher
129

Thanks for posting this. A lot of people are going to comment complaining that No Film School should keep politics out of it etc. etc.

First of all, you've shown no alignment by posting this letter, only spreading news about a Screenwriters work, and secondly....

Normally after an election, here in the UK the majority of us don't go after voters with opposing viewpoints. That's because, despite their differences, our major parties (Conservatives, Liberal Democrats and Labour) are all run by (relatively) intelligent and respectful individuals (the less said about Farage the better...).

They have actual policies, they carry themselves with a certain level of conduct (when in office, we won't mention the pig incident...), and they (for the most part)...how can I put this...aren't racist a**holes?

However, in the case of the US elections, an outspoken bigot, racist, xenophobic psycho has been elected as the United States President. If you voted for him, then from my point of view, you have elected to support a man whose views I vehemently oppose and whose words make me feel physically sick. You've sided with a man who (I believe) is an enemy of progression, freedom and racial equality and I despise you for it.

But hey, it's your right to vote and elect whomever you want...and it's my right to express my view that you're an idiot...A truly misguided, uncultured, unsympathetic, hateful, scared, ignorant idiot...

God bless democracy and freedom of speech, and God save America ;)

November 10, 2016 at 6:00PM

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THANK YOU.

November 10, 2016 at 6:42PM

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Thales Banzai
Director; Screenwriter
152

Films help me escape from the horrible political oppression happening and other bad things in the world. As a filmmaker I should be free to make films that are not about politics and not feel pressured to make the films in that genre. I like sci-fi. And some Westerns. I think I need to navigate to another site now in order to hone my skills more without being distracted.

November 11, 2016 at 10:50AM

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John K.
81

Westerns and, specially, sci-fi almost always portray the author's view of today's world. Among the best sci-fi are the most political films of all time, so good luck trying to excell at them and stay apolitical at the same time.

November 13, 2016 at 4:27AM, Edited November 13, 4:38AM

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Álex Montoya
Writer/Director
438

true words Thales. this is absolutely an appropriate post

November 10, 2016 at 9:25PM

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kj
75

Ahh yes, another somebody drunk on bias from the media thinking their rant is warranted. How about you get back to work, stop the libel and fallacious attack and come up with something original.

November 10, 2016 at 9:30PM

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Matt Battershell
Web Developer / Graphic Designer / Filmmaker
98

Only in America are films apolitical. I agree with sentiment - who cares what Aaron Sorkin has to say. I'm kind of sick of all these 0.1 percenters telling us what to say and think.

I made films for Bernie in my spare time. And now more than ever more filmmakers need to become politically active.

We are talking about a presidency that will probably send the environment to destruction. That will reverse Roe vs Wade.

Documentary is part of filmmaking. It's part of journalism.

We are the storytellers. We transmit ideas to the new generation.

A lot of who I am I owe to the TV shows I saw as a kid as well as movies.

E.T. may have been a perfect example of film that teaches acceptance. A powerful social message.

As well as Inside Out and Zootopia and Wall-E. If you don't have a message, don't make a film.

November 10, 2016 at 11:47PM

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Ed David
Director of Photography
1530

As a no-american watching from the outside my thought is this.

Land of the free my arse. You want a democracy then you need to not be such a little girl when your side looses. When you protest and riot in the streets because you lost your no different to the nutters we see in the middle east.

Trump is obviously scum and Hillary is corrupt. They are both jokes and as bad as each other. Only difference is Trump hasn't been trying to pick a fight with Russia for the past few years because its good for arms sales.

America should really be questioning why were they the best choices? How did that happen? Not loose sight of that.

Its almost 2017 and those are your candidates??? You have cars that drive themselves and above an international space station yet you can only vote for a monkey and a snake.

November 11, 2016 at 12:49AM

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I'd like to add that as entertaining as West Wing was, its politically a cartoon. Sorkin is likely politically illiterate.

November 13, 2016 at 3:42AM

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"Sorkin is likely politically illiterate."

Who-a!

November 13, 2016 at 4:29AM, Edited November 13, 4:29AM

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Álex Montoya
Writer/Director
438

This is not the sight for articles like this. This is a sight for film making not political opinions. What gives you the right to use a platform like this to push your political opinions on every one else.

November 11, 2016 at 7:34AM

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Wes Llewellyn
Director
100

Wes,
Help me understand why you believe this? Why you prefer to live in a bubble? Wanting a film site to ignore what's going on in the world just because it is a film site, is the height of willful ignorance. There is a certain amount of privilege in wanting a curated life. Filmmakers need to be immersed in the world to be better storytellers. There is nothing wrong with covering things outside of filmmaking, on a filmmaking site, especially events that will affect us all.

November 11, 2016 at 9:46AM

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I'm not American Wes, but I'm pretty sure it's your First Amendment that gives you all the right to express your political opinions, and long may that continue even when attacked by the forces of Orange.

November 11, 2016 at 10:15AM

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Alex Richardson
Director
2837

I think you both of you are missing the point.

We are not encouraging willful ignorance or censorship. We are saying there is a time and a place, and No Film School is not the appropriate platform to push political agendas.

Why? Because I came here to learn about Filmmaking.

Just in case you guys didn't know:
- There are enough politics in the mainstream media.
- You create division, and will lose clients and friends with content and quarrels like this.
- It's a waste of time

Another point I point out in my post below:

This write up did not challenge any of us in any way. It merely presents Sorkin's left winged political account and leaves it on the table.

November 11, 2016 at 10:32AM, Edited November 11, 11:12AM

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I would challenge anyone reading to examine with a critical mind why we're seeing a politically charged write up like this on No Film School.

According to the about page of No Film School, "No Film School is the leading worldwide community of filmmakers, video producers, and independent creatives."

NOT the leading worldwide community of politicians.

Regarding the comments above mine:
Are any of us really speaking with authority in terms of politics here?

Another thing... Did anyone ever see this leading to a fruitful conversation about filmmaking?

What I see is an attack from the left on right wing politics, and No Film School choosing to participate by making this their agenda/allowing their writers to push this agenda.

I get it though; being a filmmaker means using your craft to tell a story and stories that are often times inspired by the human experience. This article didn't challenge us in any way, but simply presented Sorkin's story with a provocative title and left it on the table.

Personally, you lost me on this one NoFilmSchool.com

I'm not hung up over this though. I'll be following all of the latest greatest filmmakers on Youtube, Instagram, and Facebook, and learning much more from those channels and original blogs than I ever learned here.

This shouldn't surprise anyone. I haven't seen valuable original content on Nofilmschool in a while. Most content is shared from the channels of original content makers that are actually creating valuable content.

If you have to use provocative titles, and share politically charged content to engage your audience it's time to reevaluate where you are as a business.

Innovate or die NO Film School.

November 11, 2016 at 10:21AM, Edited November 11, 11:11AM

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I dont know what you're talking, man.
Just watch this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1fMvLbE85E

November 11, 2016 at 2:56PM

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Thales Banzai
Director; Screenwriter
152

In case you missed it earlier, I'll write it again for you.

- There are enough politics in the mainstream media.
- You create division, and will lose clients and friends with content and quarrels like this.
- It's a waste of time.

Based on what you've commented earlier in the day here:
You don't argue logically, and I refuse to quarrel with you.

The kind of attitude you brought to this conversation only supports my point on why I don't subscribe to politics on No Film School.

November 11, 2016 at 3:32PM, Edited November 11, 4:11PM

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I don't argue logically with someone that tries to use logic to defend a shitty point of view.

And I don't know what you're still doing here... You said it yourself "Personally, you lost me on this one NoFilmSchool.com"

Wake up, dude.

November 11, 2016 at 7:05PM

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Thales Banzai
Director; Screenwriter
152

Yes Jonathan - NFS should heed your words and never post anything related to politics ever again.

Politics is not relevant to filmmaking in any way - just like having any significant meaning, message or moral to your film is a breach of your audience's rights.

This is very good thinking.

November 12, 2016 at 11:20PM

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Matty Hannon
Documentary filmmaker
176

How on earth is the opinion on the election of one of the greatest screenwriters, specialized in political fiction, not appropriate for this site?

November 13, 2016 at 4:37AM

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Álex Montoya
Writer/Director
438

Every branch of the heavily centralized US broadcast media/film industry is losing it's influence over a large segment of the American electorate that can no longer be inculcated further leftward, and that is the real fuel firing Aaron Sorkin's screed. He's another Boomer upset about the waning cultural influence of his generation outside of cosmopolitan echo chambers. People in The Middle pay no mind to his type of condescending, leftist sanctimony.

The funny thing is the Left could have had a long ride if they hadn't gone full force into identity politics and globalization/globalism. The Democrat party of O'neil/Moynihan would have never left this sort of power vacuum. This presidency is the product of the party of Pelosi.

Trump's controversial platform isn't much different than that of those of mainstream democrats from the 1980's. The Democrat party moved too hard and fast with the fundamental transformation of the United States, and that avarice and overreach produced my president elect, Donald J Trump.

November 11, 2016 at 10:44AM, Edited November 11, 10:50AM

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Marc B
Shooter & Editor
551

I hate when everyone calls them left, neoliberals are really on the right (especially economically) -- Bernie was on the left but he was a big exception for the Dems.

November 11, 2016 at 1:57PM

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zetty
Filmmaker
622

Democracy?
This just how much money you have in your pocket..everything else is just huge blabla..no effect on real life

November 11, 2016 at 1:45PM

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You f*cking lost. Deal with it, cokehead.

November 12, 2016 at 2:37AM

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Terma Louis
Photographer / Cinematographer / Editor
775

This thread is becoming a fantastic way to filter people.

November 13, 2016 at 4:34AM

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Álex Montoya
Writer/Director
438

A great article about the issue we're debating:
http://filmmakermagazine.com/100531-all-movies-are-political-movies-we-n...

"...But for those of us in the film world, today should also be a day where we reacknowledge and recommit ourselves to an important truth:

That every film is a political film.

Moonlight is a political film. Manchester by the Sea is a political film. The Birth of a Nation is a political film. Tallulah is a political film. Certain Women is a political film. Loving is a political film. La La Land is a political film. Arrival is a political film.

This was an election won on culture. On unchecked fear and hatred. A massive segment of our society has slipped from education and empathy. Their morales and perspectives have been twisted and perhaps irreparably perverted.

This was an election won through our screens, through entertainment. Won on easy, numbing clickbait articles that segmented our newsfeeds and kept us docile. Won on our sick desire to cover our eyes but still peek through to see what outrageous thing the celebrity candidate would say next.

This was an election won on the back of NBC, a massive entertainment conglomerate whose thirst for ratings resulted in a years-long complicity with hate, one that birthed, then fetishized, then ultimately mythologized a Frankenstein monster of corporate greed, a monster who soon they could no longer control so they him lambasted limply on their sketch comedy program, then let him host said sketch comedy show, then sent in their third-rate Johnny Carson to caress and fawn over him.

This was an election won on culture and values, won by angry white men who believe themselves to be at the center of the universe, who thirst for violence, who hunger for a rogue, fascist white male hero to deliver them magically from all perceived injustices.

Where on Earth would they get those kinds of ideas from?

Doctor Strange is a political film. Trolls is a political film. Sausage Party is a political film. Hacksaw Ridge is a political film. Finding Dory is a political film. Suicide Squad is a political film. Sully is a political film. Star Trek Beyond is a political film. Deadpool is a political film. Ride Along 2 is a political film. Don’t Breathe is a political film. Zootopia is a political film. Captain America: Civil War is a political film.

Today we need to acknowledge that those of us who work in the film industry — at all levels, in all roles, in all sectors — we carry an incredible responsibility.

We tell stories. We educate. It’s our job to define our country’s values. To define our culture.

We collectively decide which stories get told, who gets to tell them, and who gets to see them.

That’s a humongous, vital, deeply political responsibility. It’s a political power that far outrstrips the power of our individual votes, especially considering many of us live in New York or California.

We need to remember that no matter what production company, distributor, or studio we work at, no matter how expensive our films might be, no matter what “demographic” we convince ourselves in meetings we are trying to reach, every film is a political statement. Every film represents a set of values, and broadcasts these values out into society.

I’m not just talking about storylines, or moral or messages.

No. When you’re making a film, every creative and business decision you make is a political decision. Who’s directing. Where your film is set, where your film is shooting. Body types, ethnic diversity. How your female characters dress. How they behave vis a vis their male counterparts.

How morally ambiguous your story is. The emotions that you hope to elicit in your audience. Whether you want people to feel satisfied or provoked, jolted out of their comfort zones or cleansed.

How unapproachable and experimental and potentially alienating your film might be. Whether your film actually has a chance of reaching an audience, and who that audience is.

Our job is not to just to entertain. Our job is not just to placate or titillate. Our job is not just to show people what they want to see, to feed their desires, to provide empty hope and happy endings and cacophonic fight scenes.

Our job is to educate.

Our job is to provoke. Our job is to shock.

Our job is to challenge.

Our job is to inspire.

Our job is to expand.

Our job is to use entertainment as a weapon.

To reach people and then show them things that might change the way they see the world. That challenge their preconceived notions and make them feel something different.

We are not doing a good enough job. The forces of commerce have mutated our art into something that’s no longer good for our country. Into fast food.

We need to do better.

We need to take a hard look in the mirror and ask ourselves if the films we are making or helping to make are actually saying the things that need to be said. If they’re making people feel the things they need to feel. If they’re even reaching the people they need to reach, and if not, what we can do to change that.

Because for the next four years (and long afterwards), every time someone leaves a movie theater feeling contented, feeling set in their values, feeling numbed and entertained and nothing else, that’s a problem.

And if we keep allowing ourselves to be complicit in making and showing films that feed our society’s basest desires: for gluttonous violence and CGI fight scenes, for cis white male heroes, for empty morals… than we are helping to transform our nation’s movie theaters into institutions no better than our nation’s megachurches.

We are all complicit. Today we need to acknowledge and understand that our individual professional decisions have massive political and moral implications.

We need to remember and know that we are not ghosts to this shitty country and its shitty values. That we as individuals — especially those of us in the film industry who hold some level of sway over what gets made and seen — we set the tone. We each have the power to enact cultural change.

We need to resist the urge to let business interests neuter our art and turn it into simple entertainment.

We need to make better movies, starting today.

Patriots Day (January 13, 2017) is a political film, Resident Evil: The Final Chapter (January 27, 2017) is a political film, xXx 3: The Return of Xander Cage (January 20, 2017) is a political film, John Wick: Chapter 2 (Febuary 10, 2017) is a political film, Logan (March 3, 2017) is a political film, Kong: Skull Island (March 10, 2017) is a political film, Fast 8 (April 14, 2017) is a political film, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (May 5, 2017) is a political film, Baywatch (May 19, 2017) is a political film, Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (May 26, 2017) is a political film, The Mummy (June 9, 2017) is a political film, Transformers: The Last Knight (June 23, 2017) is a political film, Despicable Me 3 (June 30, 2017) is a political film, Spider-Man: Homecoming (July 7, 2017) is a political film, War for the Planet of the Apes (July 14, 2017) is a political film, Alien: Covenant (August 4, 2017) is a political film, IT (September 8, 2017) is a political film, Blade Runner 2049 (October 6, 2017) is a political film, Friday the 13th (October 13, 2017) is a political film, Saw: Legacy (October 27, 2017) is a political film, Thor: Ragnarok (November 3, 2017) is a political film, Justice League (November 17, 2017) is a political film, Star Wars: Episode VIII (December 14, 2017) is a political film, Jumanji (December 22, 2017) is a political film."

November 12, 2016 at 9:16AM

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Thales Banzai
Director; Screenwriter
152

Even Sausage Party is a political film!

November 13, 2016 at 6:22AM

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And yet he undermines his whole argument with this,

"This was an election won on culture and values, won by angry white men who believe themselves to be at the center of the universe, who thirst for violence, who hunger for a rogue, fascist white male hero to deliver them magically from all perceived injustices."

Is this not an ugly over generalization of those with opposing views? I despised Trump as much as the next guy, but I know a lot of people who voted for him that do not remotely fit this description.

It's funny, because so many of us will call for justice... just as long as it's our own flavor of justice.

The problem is not one party, or group of people. It's ALL of us. We ALL have our prejudices. We ALL seek to find the worst in those opposite of us. We ALL participate in hate speech whether we choose to recognize it or not. We are ALL the problem.

We have bullied each other for years and years, and are suddenly surprised that the whole Nation just snapped and went off the deep end! Really!?

It's like the bully who picks on the small kid in class and is surprised when the kid finally snaps and punches him back. The whole country has that same idiotic look of, "what happened!? I didn't deserve that."

I just hope we as a country can finally get over ourselves and start acting like freakin adults.

November 13, 2016 at 12:32PM

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The art of filmmaking...

Thank you for this lovely response Thales. Making stuff is hard, making GOOD stuff is harder still and making 'art' (whichever rubric you may use to define that word) requires something beyond technical skill, it requires soul.

Much of the discussion I've witnessed post-election has centered on the notion that once earned the office of President, becomes an unquestioned Fact (capitol 'F'). Therefore to offer dissent in any form of the person in that office is somehow unpatriotic or being a 'whiner' or some such. But couldn't it be that the job of artists, (perhaps all people?) is to think? And couldn't thought come in the form of dissent?

And if a thing like the outcome of an election causes fear or anger or debate couldn't it be possible that if we continue to think and not shutdown or look down upon those who have viewpoints counter to our own, couldn't it be we might all grow a bit wiser, and perhaps, be better not just as artists or filmmakers, but as humans?

I submit that it is possible that our division could lead us to strength and our strength could lead us to unity. Unity, of the sort that is not blind acceptance, nor is it a dissolution of self, but true unity where each holds their vision alongside the vision of some grand, greater destiny for us all. But then again, I like to make things up, I like to imagine, to conjure with the minds possibilities both bright and dour. Maybe you, fellow writers, creators, filmmakers, like to do that too (I hope so), because if you do, you must keep thinking and thinking and thinking.

Because in the end, to feel any emotion (or to try and engender an emotion via our work in others) requires that we are to think up that emotion in the first place.

So, let us all agree to disagree, there is unity in that at least, and unity like the seed of anything must come from somewhere.

I will continue to try and think, won't you join me?

Christopher Allight
Journeyman in arts of writing, filmmaking and life.

November 14, 2016 at 7:26PM, Edited November 14, 7:27PM

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chris allight
Writer/Editor
31

Nicely said, Sorkin.

I revere your screenplays and I respect that you are using your written talents to pass down your moral compass to your daughter so she will learn to speak up instead of stay neutral when she sees inequality in the culture surrounding her.

Keep up your brilliant words!

November 13, 2016 at 9:08AM

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This is more of a response to some of the comments below.

Yes, films are a powerful tool when it comes to sharing a certain perspective in regards to politics and social issues. Our art can have a powerful and positive impact on people. I believe that in some cases, films can create real meaningful change in this world.

However, it is a double-sided sword. I would caution filmmakers not to use their art too hastily. Yes, we all have the right to express ourselves freely, but we should do so responsibly. I think that a lot of harm can be done with good intentions. If you want to tackle a sensitive subject and give an opinion of why you think something is wrong, at least take the time to fully understand the opposing opinion. Don't create a shallow 2-dimensional version of the subject you are criticizing. Research and give it a fair representation. Otherwise, what’s the point? No one will take it seriously except for those who already agree with you. It’s lazy and ethically wrong in my opinion.

There are very few films that I though did a good job at this. Most of the time when someone wants to make a point, they do so in an overly biased and preachy manner. I find it very irritating.

November 13, 2016 at 12:18PM, Edited November 13, 12:18PM

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