» Posts Tagged ‘applications’

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Amazon StorybuilderOne of the best ways to get your screenplay under control and nicely organized is to outline it, and there are literally endless methods, tools, and materials that can get it done. One that might interest you is the just-launched Amazon Storybuilder (currently still in beta). This cloud-based digital corkboard was developed by Amazon Studios to help users virtually plan out and tack up notecards for their scripts for free. Continue on to find out more. More »

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Ted TalksDo you have an incredible message you’d like  to share with the rest of the world, but aren’t sure how to make that happen? Well TED, the set of conferences that focus on technology, entertainment, and design, is now taking applications to audition at TED@NYC, giving applicants a chance to speak at TED’s 2014 programming in Vancouver, Canada. Since they’re going to be celebrating their 30th anniversary, they’re looking for speakers who have an idea worth spreading and know what it means to move into “the next chapter”. More »

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So much for the deal expiring at the end of August — Adobe’s offer of their entire Creative Suite for $30/month (as opposed to $50/month) is now available until June of 2013 for current CS users (CS3 or later). You have to sign up for a full year of Creative Cloud but the savings totals $240; I myself am a satisfied Creative Cloud user, and who doesn’t like saving 40%? More »

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We’ve posted about these discounts before, but since both deals expire shortly, it’s worth mentioning one last time. Final Draft is selling its long-awaited Writer app for iPad at the App Store for $29.99 until Sept. 30, a 40% savings off the list price of $49.99. If you’re not a Final Draft user or you need to upgrade to Final Draft 8, The Writers Store is selling its Final Draft 8 Platinum Edition Package for $169 (32% off Final Draft 8 sticker price) and Final Draft 8 upgrades for $59 (40% discount). The Writers Store discounts also end Sept. 30, so if you’re looking to making the switch or upgrade to Final Draft 8, or add Final Draft Writer to your mobile arsenal, time is of the essence. Check out the video below for an overview of the new Final Draft Writer. More »

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Coinciding with the long-awaited Final Draft Writer app for iPad finally making its debut at a discounted price until the end of September, The Writers Store is offering its Final Draft 8 Platinum Edition Package (Final Draft 8 plus a collection of screenwriting extras) for $169 — that’s a 32% savings off the Final Draft 8 sticker price alone. For current Final Draft users looking to upgrade, The Writers Store is offering Final Draft 8 upgrades for $59, a 40% savings. The discounts at The Writers Store end on Sept. 30, so don’t miss out if you’ve been considering the switch to Final Draft or upgrading to Final Draft 8. More »

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In what will surely be welcome news for those who routinely use Photoshop and Premiere, Adobe is planning to natively support the higher resolution display of the new Macbook Pro (as well as any other HiDPI displays in the future). While there are certain creative applications that immediately supported the Retina resolution with software updates (namely Apple’s Final Cut Pro X and Motion), Adobe was not able to offer this support right away. For those who are loving the extra screen resolution, it’s disappointing to then have to open Adobe products only to see them not share the same crispness as the native apps. Not all Creative Cloud applications will receive support (at least at this time), but you can read the full list of programs that will get software updates below. More »

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We posted this earlier this month, but the deal expires in a week so it’s worth one last notification. If you’re a current user of any Adobe software (CS3 or later), you can upgrade to Adobe’s new all-inclusive Creative Cloud membership for $29.95/month (instead of $49.95) for the first year — a savings of $240. The discount expires at the end of August, so get cracking if you’re thinking of signing up. More »

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I’ve been meaning to do this personally, but almost forgot — so here’s a reminder of an expiring deal. If you’re a current user of any Adobe software (CS3 or later), you can upgrade to Adobe’s new all-inclusive Creative Cloud membership for $29.95/month (instead of $49.95) for the first year — a savings of $240. The discount expires at the end of this month (August), so get cracking if you’re thinking of signing up. More »

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In the industry, Final Draft and Movie Magic Screenwriter dominate among screenwriting software applications. Full disclosure: I write my scripts on Final Draft. Why? Because when I started to write scripts, you had three choices for software: Final Draft, Movie Magic Screenwriter, or Microsoft Word. Plus, as a production assistant, I was given a copy of Final Draft to type up script revisions for a writer married to his typewriter, so I had an easy entry point with the industry standard. Today, for filmmakers not willing to shell out between $190 and $250 for professional screenwriting software, here are five options ranging from free to $49.95. More »

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After the software-only version was made available earlier in the week, Adobe Creative Cloud CS6 is live starting today. If the cost of owning this software has been prohibitive for you in the past, Adobe is finally allowing you to “rent” on a month-to-month or yearly basis. If you’ve never purchased the software in the past, the best deal is their plan that charges $50 per month for a year contract. If you just want to try it out on a month-to-month basis, it will be a little more expensive at $75 per month. If you are upgrading, they are doing a special promotion for $30 per month for the first year. More »

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Adobe Creative Suite 6 is now available. For filmmakers, the bundle of interest is Production Premium CS6, which includes: a redesigned Premiere Pro, Speed Grade for color grading, the new log and ingest application Prelude, new versions of After Effects and Audition, and Creative Cloud integration. Creative Cloud is scheduled to launch May 11th, and will give you access to all CS6 apps for $50/month — or $30/month for the first year if you’re a registered user of any Adobe product since CS3 and use this link by August 31 (that’s 40% off). The new Premiere Pro integrates some speed-focused features borrowed from Apple’s much-maligned Final Cut Pro X, including “hoverscrub,” which was one of my favorite FCPX features; here’s a look at the new version of Adobe’s NLE. More »

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The previously announced upgrade to Adobe’s Creative Suite, version CS5.5, is now shipping. From individual titles all the way up to the $2,599 behemoth known as the Master Collection, the new programs are available as instant downloads (well, depending on the speed of your connection). Direct links: Adobe Master Collection CS5.5, Adobe Production Premium CS5.5, Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, Adobe After Effects CS5.5, Adobe Audition CS5.5.

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Adobe today announced Creative Suite 5.5, a mid-cycle upgrade to CS5 that introduces significant new features to the video programs, adds mobile-based publishing and program extensions, and offers a new subscription payment model that eliminates the sticker shock of purchasing the full suite. More »

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The Foundry is best known for high-end compositing tools like Nuke, but they’re set to release their latest application, Storm, on March 1st. Storm is a much-needed low-cost “RED Production Hub,” which will retail for the very reasonable price of $375 — reasonable considering it’s not only designed to help log and process the .R3D camera originals, but it’s also meant to be a post-production solution that will take RED-based edits all the way through final color correction to delivery. If you’re interested in the RAW workflow and want to play around with some .R3D files in Storm, here’s your chance — it’s in free public beta until March 1. And if you don’t have any .R3D files to work with, I’ve got you covered there as well: More »

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About a year ago I bought the first version of Scrivener, a Mac writing app that falls somewhere between a structuring/outlining application and a proper word processor/screenwriting application. It’s an intriguing proposition, with virtual notecards, a nice full-screen writing mode, and plenty of other bells and whistles. Since adding it to my dock, however, I haven’t found myself using it that often — though I’m not sure if it’s through any fault of the software or just because I tend to outline the old-fashioned way (with pen and paper). Still, there’s a new version that’s just been released after a long development cycle, and it’s worth checking out if you’re a screenwriter or any other kind of long-form writer. More »

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When the iPad was first announced I wrote an article about how the device could affect filmmakers, saying, “when you’re developing a cross-platform story, what happens if you can’t define your project along clear lines? Should I say it? ‘There’s an app for that.’” Stonehenge Productions has stepped in to create these very apps, which basically package your film along with a number of extras in a manner similar to a DVD release. This allows you to sell your film in the App store — thereby circumnavigating your way onto an Apple device without having to go through the iTunes movie store. More »

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Lifehacker is currently running a great series called “Lifehacker Packs,” wherein they round up all their favorite applications for the iOS, Android, and Mac platforms (no Windows love yet). Many of these applications are free, and each post is a great resource for anyone looking to add some creative/productive/fun tools to their computerized lives. The compilations are aimed at anyone, not just filmmakers (the full links are at the bottom of this post), but I’ve grabbed a number of relevant apps (and Lifehacker blurbs) for independent creatives: More »

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The Mac operating system is elegant and simple, and the same goes for its process for installing and uninstalling applications — right? After all, to install an application, you just drag an app to your “Applications” folder, and to uninstall it, you just drag it to the trash. Simple. But the dirty secret with OS X is this simplicity comes at a cost: when you drag an application to the trash, you’re leaving a bunch of associated files scattered behind on your hard drive, and they’ll never go away. As I’ve recently been migrating my old laptop files to my new hackintosh, I’ve discovered a ton of old, orphaned files. Luckily, there are a number of simple ways to get rid of them. More »

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One of the many items on my “to write” list is a “helpful applications for filmmakers” article. I was thinking if I spent some time on the Moon I could write all of these articles, but short of that (anyone who’s seen the Duncan Jones/Sam Rockwell film will know what I mean), there are just too many potential articles to crank out while also trying to make movies! Thankfully FilmmakerIQ and Filmmaker Magazine have both posted application roundups, which, as you can guess from the “filmmaker” in each publication’s name, focus on applications for filmmakers. Highlights from both articles include: More »

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As transmedia pioneer Lance Weiler recently wrote in the pages of Filmmaker, mobile devices “offer opportunities for filmmakers to reach audiences directly, with little to no intervention from middlemen. While the selling of a film on iTunes requires a filmmaker to go through one or maybe two aggregators, it is possible to go direct to the App Store as long as the mobile app receives approval from Apple.” But while Apple’s iOS requires approval, Google’s Android does not. Not only is Google’s app marketplace more open than Apple’s ecosystem, but Android has rapidly rising market share, and now Google is releasing App Inventor for Android, a new tool for creating applications with drag-and-drop simplicity — no coding (or approval) required. More »