» Posts Tagged ‘canon60d’

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Canon 70D BodyThere was a pretty solid leak a few days ago showing off the camera and specs, and now we have the official announcement for the Canon 70D, the replacement of Canon’s 60D. The new DSLR is sporting a brand new 20MP sensor from Canon — which is notable because it’s the first time in a number of years that they have introduced a new APS-C camera without an 18MP sensor. There is word that this one could set a new benchmark for high-ISO performance, which would be impressive considering the higher pixel count on the same size sensor. Check out more information on the camera below. More »

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Canon 70D Leaked PhotoThere was word that this one was going to be announced back in March, but now there are much clearer signs that the 70D, a newer version of the Canon 60D, should be coming very soon. A picture has leaked showing the camera and specs, and we’ve also got a possible announcement date: July 2nd. While we can’t know the final video quality until we get our hands on one, there is a great chance it will work with Magic Lantern and the new RAW video hack. Check out some of the specs below. More »

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rawmagic04There have been a few programs floating around to convert the .RAW files from Magic Lantern on the PC and Mac, but getting the files into a usable form takes a little bit of effort, as these programs were turning the files into DNG first, which aren’t compatible with programs like DaVinci Resolve (since DNG is a stills format). Now we have a better solution as Thomas Worth from Rarevision (who created 5DtoRGB) has created a program called RAWMagic to get After Effects and Resolve-supported CinemaDNG files straight from the .RAW camera originals. More »

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Magic_Lantern_logo-whiteIf you’ve been following the Magic Lantern RAW video news, you have probably seen quite a bit of material from the Canon 5D Mark II and the 5D Mark III. The hack, however, is working on many of Canon’s cameras, including the 50D (a camera that never shot video before), 60D, 6D, and more. Even if a camera is supported, that doesn’t mean you’re necessarily going to get full resolutions while recording continuously  so Roman over on the Magic Lantern forum has put together a list of the Canon cameras and max burst and continuous resolutions currently supported. Check out if your camera is currently supported below. More »

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Canon 5D Mark III at Big SurStrides are being made to get more and more resolution and frames out of the lower-end Canons using the Magic Lantern RAW video hack. Right now the only way to get continuous recording is by shooting at about 960 x 540 at 24fps, but other resolutions are working for a specific number of frames. Nick Driftwood, who has done a considerable amount of work with the Panasonic GH2, has been shooting some tests with the Canon 60D, and he’s posted his first video online. We’ve also got a metered dynamic range test comparing H.264 and RAW on the 5D Mark II, as well as a fantastic example of what the Canon 5D Mark III using Magic Lantern is capable of. More »

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There are many more options for DSLRs and smaller cameras than there ever have been, but there are still a lot of reasons you might want to use Canon’s cameras. For one thing, they still take incredible still photos, but on the video side, even while there might be some cameras that resolve more detail or have less aliasing/moire, some of the older releases from Canon still give a great built-in look that doesn’t require much work in post (subjective, of course). JJ Kim from Orange Wedding Films recently took a look at the newer full-frame Canon 6D, along with the APS-C 7D and 60D, and the full-frame 5D Mark II. In the video below, JJ compares their features/specs, as well as image quality and low-light/moire performance. More »

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There have been many reports over the last few months of dwindling Canon 60D stock — which can often indicate that a replacement is on the horizon. A number of rumors have surfaced recently regarding the possible replacement, the 70D, and where that camera will stand in terms of Canon’s lineup. We’ve spoken about Canon’s future product line, and how a 7D Mark II might fit in, and while there is no question the new 70D will have an APS-C sensor, the only other detail we definitely know is that Canon will have a product announcement near the end of March, based on the invite that just went out. More »

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As we approach midnight in most places around the world (with some already celebrating the new year), the hardworking team over at Magic Lantern has delivered more updates to the trusty Canon DSLRs. We now have a second alpha for the Canon 7D — a camera that we previously thought was unhackable — and more updates are on their way with support for the Canon T4i, 6D, and 40D. Check out all of the exciting developments below. More »

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Magic Lantern, the well-known third party firmware solution for Canon DSLRs that we discussed a few weeks ago, has finally released their newest firmware version 2.3 as a free download. Since it takes a tremendous amount of work to put together these firmware updates, they were asking for a donation in exchange for the download, or you could compile the firmware update yourself for free (which isn’t very straightforward). Check out the video below to see some of the great features that have been added in this version. More »

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Magic Lantern, the hack third party firmware solution for Canon cameras, has come a long, long way since its first release. Stability and new features have been the top priorities for the team, and it looks like with the newest release they are delivering on both counts. Even though Canon has been increasing the feature set of the higher-end cameras like the Canon 5D Mark III and the 1D X, they have been trying to differentiate the video and photo product lines as much as possible. For those familiar with the traditional features of a video camera, using DSLR presents quite a few challenges. The goal of Magic Lantern, however, is to introduce in firmware all of these quirks that make shooting with real video cameras that much easier. More »

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Canon recently announced a firmware update for the Canon 5D Mark III, and that led the way for the great folks at Magic Lantern to begin porting their hack. Already a big hit on the Mark II and other Canon cameras, Magic Lantern could open up specific features many believe Canon should have included in the first place. Chuck Westfall has said that the 5D Mark III and the 1D X might never get a full, clean HDMI, mainly because Canon (obviously) puts more money and attention into the video features on their expensive video-centric Cinema EOS line (though he also says they are always listening to consumers). Most of all, they want to keep the two product lines separate, and possibly the only hope for this feature (and others like it) is for something like Magic Lantern to unlock the hidden power of the camera. More »

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Is real-time High Dynamic Range imaging, ala RED’s HDRx, coming to Canon DSLRs with the next version of Magic Lantern firmware? Well, yes and no — thus the asterisk. The system they’ve developed splits a 24p stream into two 12FPS exposures, one high and one low, and then interpolates the frames. It’s an interesting hack, demonstrated here: More »

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How’s that for an exciting thumbnail, right? This is only of interest for 5D Mark II, 7D, and forthcoming 60D shooters, but DSLRs gobble batteries at an alarming rate in movie mode. To date we’ve been faced with paying $70-$100 for each genuine Canon LP-E6 battery, or taking our chances with eBay models for $10. Until now… More »

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The ink on Nikon’s D3100 announcement has hardly dried, and here we are with some stiff competition. It’s not really news anymore that a DSLR shoots full HD (1080p), and all three of these cameras qualify in that category. The new Canon 60D brings with it manual audio, and Canon’s flexible video recording options of 1080p20/25/24 and 720p60/50. Meanwhile the Sony A55 and A33 claim some interesting new “phase detection” autofocus technology thanks to a translucent mirror. From most expensive to cheapest, the Canon 60D will be $1,100 (body only), and the Sony A55 and A33 will be $750 and $650, respectively. All three cameras sport APS-C sensors. However, while the Canon looks like a winner, I think the Sonys will fail filmmakers for one main reason: More »