» Posts Tagged ‘iphone’

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HyperlapseInstagram played a huge role in making vintage photo filters accessible and ubiquitous. Through the years they’ve added new looks, a social media dimension, and a Vine-like short video application. Yesterday, they took their brand to the next level by launching a standalone app that photographers and videographers alike (as well as everyone else) will appreciate — Hyperlapse, a time-lapse app that has some pretty exciting features: its simple design, sharing capabilities, and especially its image stabilization technology, which is not only absolutely key for time-lapse photography, but was something absent in mobile videography/photography until now. More »

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The Music bedIf you’ve ever made a movie before, you most likely understand how frustrating it can be finding the right music for your project that is not only affordable, but good. That’s what makes The Music Bed so promising. It’s a platform designed to be mutually beneficial for indie filmmakers and indie musicians, where the licenses are reasonably priced, the music is good, and navigating through it all is surprisingly uncomplicated. Now, The Music Bed is making finding the right song a whole lot easier by releasing their free mobile iOS app that makes their entire music library accessible right on your iPhone or iPad. More »

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ixy_largeOver a year ago, RØDE introduced the iXY Microphone for the iPhone 4, the first device for iOS capable of 24-bit/96k audio recordings, which meant studio quality audio could be collected with a device that could fit inside your pocket. However, iPhone 5 users were pretty much out of luck until today. RØDE announced the highly anticipated update that allows you to use the award-winning mic with your iPhone 5, 5c, and 5s. Now fitted with a Lighting connector, the iXY microphone will provide the same quality audio found in the previous version, but on the latest Apple smart phone devices. More »

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Bentley AdYou would think that an ad for Bentley, which makes some of the most expensive and luxurious cars on the planet, would pull out all the stops to make their product look absolutely perfect by using a camera that mirrored the opulence of its subject. But instead, the ad was shot on an everyday smartphone — an iPhone 5s to be exact, and the result was surprisingly gorgeous! Continue on to see what a beautiful 2014 Bentley Mulsanne looks like through the eye of a smartphone, as well as some behind the scenes footage that shows all of the added goodies these filmmakers used to make their images pop. More »

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LuuvThere are many stabilization options out there for action cameras and smartphones, several of which we’ve covered here. With all of them ranging in price, ergonomics, and technology, but the LUUV stabilizer, created by a team based out of Germany, not only has an interesting design, but can do some pretty cool things for all of you GoPro/smartphone filmmakers. Continue on to find out more about this stabilizer, currently running a campaign on Indiegogo. More »

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Weekend Read iPhone script reader app Quote-UnquoteHave you ever tried to read a screenplay on your iPhone? It’s awful. You struggle with pinch and zoom in a vain attempt to read the stupid thing. The iPhone just isn’t meant to read screenplays. Or is it? Thanks to Weekend Read, a new iPhone app from Quote-Unquote Apps, screenplays now actually look good on your iPhone. In fact, the next time you’re stuck in line or riding the subway to work, you may actually want to read a screenplay on your iPhone with Weekend Read. And it’s free. More »

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Apple 1-24-14 iPhone 5S AdJanuary 24, 2014 marked 30 years since the original Macintosh was unveiled by Apple, and to commemorate the occasion, they decided to make a video around the world in just one day, showing all the ways people use Apple products. What better device to shoot this commercial on than the iPhone 5S — which plenty of people have in their pockets? Check out the full ad below, as well as what it took to coordinate the crews around the world. More »

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Lightstrap product photoThe iPhone 5s is slowly becoming one beast of a tool when it comes to smartphone filmmaking, and it’s not just because it now records 120fps. All of the accessories and extras, from anamorphic lens adapters to lav mics, are helping filmmakers build a decent toolbox for on-the-go/spontaneous filming, and now Oakland-based Brick & Pixel have developed an iPhone case called Lightstrap that will give you 10x more light to work with than the built-in flash, as well as control over brightness levels and color temperature. Currently on Kickstarter, Lightstrap may be a good solution to low-light problems. More »

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iPhone Anamorphic LensThough shooting with anamorphic lenses isn’t anything new, the aesthetic it produces, the dimentionality and oval bokeh, has become more and more popular among independent filmmakers. Unfortunately, lenses and adapters are often too expensive for indies to utilize them — unless of course you’re a smartphone filmmaker. Moondog Labs, based out of Rochester, NY, has developed an affordable 1.33x anamorphic adapter for the iPhone 5 and 5S that produces the distinctive horizontal lens flares and wide aspect ratio of anamorphic shooting. And it’s cheap! Continue on to find out more. More »

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RODEGripAny time you mention the use of a smartphone on a serious professional filmmaking project, you’re bound to get a few looks. However, this new tool from RØDE might be something that could really be helpful on whatever kind of shoot you’re on. A couple of days ago, the Australian-based company announced their new multi-purpose mounting chassis/pistol grip, the RØDEGrip, designed for the iPhone 4 and 4s, which can be used and mounted in numerous ways to help users capture audio and video with their phones. Continue on for more information on the RØDEGrip. More »

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Streets of MilanoWhen the iPhone 5s came out, one of the first questions, at least I had, was, “How’s the video?” Smartphones have been providing filmmakers a quick and easy outlet for making videos on the fly, but the tools at their disposal were pretty limited. But the iPhone 5s, with its new features, including the impressive 120fps setting, it’s quickly becoming a great asset for filmmakers. Check out the slow motion short Streets of Milano to get an idea of what you can produce with the iPhone 5s. More »

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Apple iPhone 5S Camera Hero ImageApple released new versions of their cellular device today: the flagship iPhone 5S, and a lower-cost plastic phone they are calling the 5C (the C stands for color, as the device will have a few different colored backs). While most of the features for the 5S have been known for some time now, the camera has received a modest upgrade. The spec that video people will probably find most interesting is the fact that you’ll be able to record 120fps in 720p, putting it squarely in GoPro territory. Check out the sample videos below to see the slow motion in action. More »

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vineWhen Vine, Twitter’s video-sharing app, was introduced earlier this year, it was expected to be a simple add-on to Twitter, i.e., a way to share short videos as supplements to tweets (“Hey guyz, check me out at the grocery store. :) lol #justinbieber”). The app, which allows for 6 seconds of looping video and no retakes or editing beyond internal jump cuts, took off, and filmmakers like David Lynch and Adam Goldberg made art and comedy out of the app’s inherent limitations. On Monday night, your humble correspondent went to the Upper East Side of Manhattan to meet with Vine master Kyle Williams (aka Keelayjams) and learned some of his secrets. Click below to learn how Kyle makes his Vines, and some tricks to put Vine to use for you as an indie filmmaker. More »

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Ryan Gosling Wont Eat His CerealVine, the Twitter-owned iOS app that lets you take, upload, and now embed 6 seconds of video, has been making the rounds since it was released back in January of this year. Tribeca held a contest for filmmakers to make movies with Vine, but similar to Twitter itself when it began, we haven’t quite figured out its true purpose. That is, until now. Ryan McHenry, who directed a BAFTA-winning short film called Zombie Musical, has created something of true genius with the app. Behold, Ryan Gosling Won’t Eat Cereal, the very reason Vine, and possibly the internet, was created: More »

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On the other side of the lens spectrum at NAB 2013 this year, Schneider has introduced some lenses for a little camera known as the iPhone. The iPro Lens System, released last year, has received an upgrade this year, adding 2 lenses and a system for the iPhone 5. Hit the jump for the details. More »

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The iPhone and app store is constantly evolving into an important tool for independent filmmakers. From camera manuals, to slates, to light meters, the versatility and ease of the device has impacted just about every filmmaker I know — and it’s here to stay. There are countless iPhone apps out there that can make life on location easier, all without breaking the bank. Click through to check out three that I use regularly. More »

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It’s far too easy to get caught up in the technological aspects of filmmaking, whether it be with new cameras, lenses, NLEs, or anything else. Focusing on gear is easy when something new comes out practically every day, but all of this technology is in place for the purpose of helping us tell better stories. What better way to remind ourselves of this than to see a great story made with what is widely considered to be “less than adequate” equipment? Such is the case with Searching for Sugar Man, the Academy Award winner for Best Feature Documentary at this year’s Oscars, part of which was shot on, as you might have already guessed, an iPhone. Check out the trailer for this fascinating film below: More »

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Every once in a while I am reminded that I live in an age with an eerie yet delightful attribute: I can ask why isn’t there a device or piece of software that does a certain thing, and then usually within 6 months the thing I wanted becomes a reality. Case in point: I was wondering how a friend of mine went about keeping track of a bunch of major film festival deadlines. The most obvious answer was that he probably spends time on Withoutabox and enters in deadlines into some calendar software. Still, I couldn’t help but ask myself “why isn’t there an all-in-one app that helps filmmakers keep track of film festivals?” As if on cue, a few days later iFilmfest popped up on my digital radar. More »

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We recently posted about RØDE’s iXY microphone and Rec app for iOS devices. While perhaps not suitable for everyone’s needs (or inversely, budget), it marks another step toward a lone multi-purpose tool handy to the crafty filmmaker — the iOS iPhone/iPad. While I’ll never own one, even I have to hand it to the iLeatherman. In a pinch, it’s a light meter, it’s a GoPro, it’s a shot designer, and with iXY and RØDE Rec, it’s a dual-system audio recorder, too. Now, RØDE continues its drive to make iOS a viable field sound-rec system with the smartLav lavalier microphone — as does the Apogee ONE, a like-minded iPad portable ‘recording studio’ system. RØDE has also upgraded its VideoMic for those run-and-gun shooters unsatisfied with smartphone sound — check out the details of each below. More »

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Twitter is “the internet’s SMS.” Instagram is the Twitter of pictures. Some app somewhere is prophesied to be “the Instagram of Video.” I’ve used epic words for social media’s ‘cinemaminigram’ before, because it’s apparently that big of a deal — or it may just be YouTube. Then again, if Instagram is Twitter for photos, but Facebook nabbed Instagram — all while ‘Instagram for Video’ is still out there — what’s a Twitter to do? The next best thing, or better: Twitter has just dropped Vine for iOS. It’s a lot like Instagram, but for 6 second looping videos. Given that Twitter already is, well, the Instagram of words, this app could be the ‘IoV.’ Is this saga at the beginning of its end? More »