Nikon Reveals Their First Touchscreen DSLR Camera, the D5500

Nikon unveiled their newest camera today at this year's CES, the D5500, the company's first touchscreen DSLR. 

If you were hoping to see a bunch of new features in this iteration of Nikon's D-series you might be a little disappointed. Although the addition of a built-in vignette control function, a built-in intervalometer, and touch controls on its 3.2" screen are welcome changes (although Nikon is a little late to the party), it's kind of the only major change you're going to see on the D5500, since it has a lot of the same features as the D5300, like the 24.2MP DX-Format CMOS Sensor, no OLPF, 1080p video up to 60fps, Wi-Fi, and a max ISO of 25600.

They also introduced two new lenses, an FX 300mm f/4 f/4E PF ED VR which is shorter and lighter than the original, and an updated DX 55-200mm f/4-5.6G ED VR II.

Specs:

  • 24.2MP DX-Format CMOS Sensor
  • EXPEED 4 Image Processor
  • No Optical Low-Pass Filter
  • 3.2" 1,037k-Dot Vari-Angle Touchscreen
  • 1920 x 1080: 60 fps, 30 fps, 24 fps
  • Built-In Wi-Fi and GPS Connectivity
  • Continuous Shooting up to 5 fps
  • 39-Point Multi-CAM 4800DX AF Sensor
  • ISO 100 - 25600
  • Built-In Intervalometer
  • Availability: February 2015
  • Price: $900 Body Only, $1,000 with 18-55mm Lens, $1,200 with 18-140mm Lens

There are several new features on the D5500 that'll be beneficial for photographers, but it's unclear if there are any real changes under the hood for video shooters besides the touchscreen.

While there aren't too many D5500 samples at the moment, these videos from the D5300 should prove to have similar quality as the new camera:

A couple to show you how the D5300 performs in low-light situations (again, the D5500 should be similar):

The body-only price for the D5500 is $900, which certainly isn't inexpensive. In fact, given the fact that they share so many of the same features, you might as well just go for the D5300 and save yourself $200 — unless you want that touchscreen, then by all means have at it.

Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 300mm f/4E PF ED VR Lens

Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 300mm f/4E PF ED VR Lens

This full-frame lens is going to retail for $2,000 and will be available in February. It uses a Phase Fresnel (PF) element to reduce the length to 5.8" and the weight to 1.6lbs. 

Nikon AF-S DX NIKKOR 55-200mm f/4-5.6G ED VR II Lens

Nikon AF-S DX NIKKOR 55-200mm f/4-5.6G ED VR II Lens

This APS-C lens will run for $300 and will also ship in February.     

Your Comment

12 Comments

yawn

January 6, 2015 at 2:23AM

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Igor Matijevic
Screenwriter
110

Do you know if it has a focus motor built in? Would love to buy AF lenses and actually have autofocus on it!

January 6, 2015 at 7:46AM, Edited January 6, 7:46AM

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Lucas Zanella
Director / DP / Editor
112

I seriously doubt it. That is reserved for their higher end (over $1000) cameras.

January 6, 2015 at 8:40AM

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Mike Tesh
Pro Video / Indie Filmmaker
839

Well, that's a bummer. I guess I'm gonna stick to the D5300 and just save money to buy a better glass (and AF-S lenses are pretty expensive around here)!

January 6, 2015 at 9:06AM

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Lucas Zanella
Director / DP / Editor
112

The big question is, can you change the aperture now while shooting?

January 6, 2015 at 8:36AM

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Mike Tesh
Pro Video / Indie Filmmaker
839

Sadly no. Only the full frame cameras in the Nikon line-up have that feature (excluding the d600 and d610). You can however have the auto-iso function this time around. I have a hard time understanding what crowd Nikon is targeting with these upgrades to their DX cameras....

January 6, 2015 at 5:39PM

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Stavros Toussas
Photographer, film-maker
81

Only with manual aperture lenses, like the AF-D lenses or the older AI-S lenses, where you are physically moving the aperture control by hand.

January 7, 2015 at 10:51AM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
32862

The D5200 had/has a built-in intervalometer so they were on that game a few years ago. Which means this camera has even fewer "new" features. Every camera since the D5200 has only taken baby steps ahead in the under $1k DSLR group unfortunately.

January 6, 2015 at 12:35PM, Edited January 6, 12:35PM

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Sean Korbitz
Director of Photography
203

Apparently this one lacks GPS though. Not sure why they pulled that out.

January 7, 2015 at 10:16AM

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Mike Tesh
Pro Video / Indie Filmmaker
839

The promotional materials mention "Flat" picture profile control. I was unable to find more information about this, anybody more lucky?

How does it differ from fine tuned Neutral picture profile, available already on D5100?

January 11, 2015 at 9:26AM

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Petr Schreiber
Passion for video in all forms
67

You also might want to take a look at the free custom FLAAT picture profiles created specifically to shoot video by Samuel Hurtado...

http://www.similaar.com/foto/flaat-picture-controls/index.html

January 11, 2015 at 1:41PM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
32862

You also might want to take a look at the free custom FLAAT picture profiles created specifically to shoot video by Samuel Hurtado...

http://www.similaar.com/foto/flaat-picture-controls/index.html

January 15, 2015 at 8:08AM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
32862

The flat picture style is new, and was built by Nikon to show the full dynamic range of the sensor, which is rated at 14+. It's an amazing sensor.

May 6, 2015 at 11:45PM

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Check out the video I shot with the Nikon D5500. It shows the incredible picture quality of the sensor. https://youtu.be/kD6TltFPffc A full review of the camera to follow.

May 6, 2015 at 11:47PM, Edited May 6, 11:47PM

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