March 8, 2015

Easyrig Mini is a Budget Version of One of the Most Interesting Camera Stabilizers Out There

EasyRig Mini Review Story & Heart
Filmmakers these days have access to an overwhelming array of camera movement tools. One that often gets overlooked, however, is the Easyrig.

In essence, the Easyrig is a nifty overhead cable mechanism that allows you to evenly distribute the weight of a camera throughout your entire upper body. This system greatly reduces the spinal and neck strain that heavy shoulder rigs can cause, especially when they're not balanced properly, and it completely eliminates the arm strain that comes with holding a MōVi or similar stabilizer for more than three minutes at a time.

Our friends over at Story & Heart recently put together a fantastic review/tutorial for the Easyrig Mini, which supports camera systems weighing up to nine pounds. There's also the Easyrig Mini Strong, which supports weights between nine and thirteen pounds. These weight ranges make the Easyrig Minis suitable for everything between DSLR and mirrorless rigs, to cameras like the FS7.

While the main benefit of using Easyrigs is that they remove undue physical strain on your arms, shoulders, and spine — thus making long days of shooting far less physically demanding and painful — they also have a unique aesthetic when it comes to the quality of the camera movement they create.

Obviously, the Easyrig isn't going to provide silky smooth motion like a Steadicam or a high-end gimbal stabilizer, nor is it going to resemble traditional handheld footage. It falls somewhere between the two, which produces a type of movement that mirrors the movement of the body when the camera operator is walking around, and which creates a unique floating aesthetic when the operator is standing still. As Justin mentions in the video above, this type of movement can have many practical uses in telling a story visually, particularly when trying to capture point of view shots.

At $1300, the Easyrig Mini still may be out of reach price-wise for many of us. However, for working professionals who are looking to alleviate the potential medical problems that come along with shooting loads of handheld, the Easyrig is almost a must. For everyone else, it's an excellent rental option for certain shoots, especially when the Easyrig aesthetic is called for in your particular story.     

Your Comment

14 Comments

Oh my god so expensive for a springy hanger... Mostly considering the prices of some gymbal stabilizers..

March 8, 2015 at 7:19AM, Edited March 8, 7:19AM

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Chema Mumford
Filmmaker, Documentary, Cinematographer
281

Thats what I was thinking. It's a great idea (although clunky and not very good looking, as a wedding filmmaker I would not consider it), but just not worth that price.

March 8, 2015 at 9:31AM

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Gerbert Floor
DP / Director / Camera / Editor
315

These things will be way overpriced because they are new, wait till the chinese copy them then they get more affordable/normal priced.

March 8, 2015 at 12:32PM

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P.J.
CreaBea
81

March 8, 2015 at 5:52PM

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Mason Hunsicker
DP, Writer, Director
146

that's right in the ballpark they've been priced at for years, and the full sized are an industry standard for any camera op working in reality/ob doc/news/etc, and they get a little bit of love in drama, too, depending on the style of shooting.

even if you had a cheaper gymbal stabilizer, you'd want one of these guys to help you hold it upright all day long. but in that case you're more likely going to need the full sized which runs about $2500.

if you're working full time as a camera op on productions of that size, then the price isn't going to bother you. if you're not, then it's probably still worth taking note of what the pros use, anyway.

March 8, 2015 at 10:24PM

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Ben Howling
Writer / Director
600

I guess I'm the only one who thought this was surprisingly affordable.

March 9, 2015 at 12:17AM

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Taylor Russ
Director of Photography
654

I saw a seminar by Sean Bobbit on handheld camerawork and he touched on the Easyrig briefly. He said it takes the movement of the operators hips and puts it into the camera. Mostly that's a bad thing but it could be a look to persue. The main intention is for stationary use although adding a gimbal is a great combo.

March 9, 2015 at 4:31AM

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Peter Phillips
Filmmaker
626

Had the opportunity to use one of these at last IBC, and I must say, they are really comfortable. I can imagine that the real benefit comes when you get the big one, combined with, say, a DJI Ronin. That way you can shoot super steady and nicely flowing shots all day - handheld - without needing to rest, sit down or faint every 2.5 minutes.

March 9, 2015 at 4:40AM

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Jeroen Rommelaars
Animator - Videographer - Motion Tracking
921

Looks cool, however too bulky for me!

March 9, 2015 at 12:20PM

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Kyle Lamar
Director Producer DP
1034

I wouldn't really call it a stabiliser (or compare it to other stabilisers). If you use it with a shoulder mount it doesn't look any different to normal shoulder mount handheld. Just saves you a lifetime in physiotherapy bills. Even low weight rigs will give you back problems if you shoot hand held regularly, for long periods of time. I always request one on jobs where they want majority handheld.

March 9, 2015 at 7:07PM

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Josh Stafield
Director of Photography, Editor
231

Considering he had to show us mostly slo-mo to "show this off", I'd say this unit really isn't much of what it's cracked up to be. And yes, definitely overpriced.

March 9, 2015 at 11:37PM

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Vidrazor
540

I get the idea, but the level of dorkyness is over 9000. I'll keep breaking my back until then so that it shows up on the x-ray.

March 11, 2015 at 11:19PM

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Steve-O
Director of Photography
125

Pshhh how do you showcase the stability with all slo-mo shots... Not convinced

March 16, 2015 at 5:18PM

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Using slow motion on camera-support reviews simply blows their credibility.

Seriously, just don't.

April 16, 2015 at 7:15PM

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David Gurney
DP
1787