New Nikon D7200 Adds 1080p 60fps & Native ISO Up to 25,600

Nikon D7200 with 18-140mm Lens

The new 24MP APS-C Nikon D7200 replaces the previous D7100 that was released in 2013, and with it comes a bunch of video improvements, including 60fps at 1080p, though it's at a slight 1.3x crop factor (which is a crop of the 1.5x APS-C frame). If you're looking at low-light performance, the native ISO of the camera has improved two stops to 25,600, from a native max of 6,400 on the previous model (it was expandable to 25,600). It's likely that processing has improved quite significantly in order to get noise under control at higher ISOs.

Here's the intro video:

Some examples of the quality of the camera, including a BTS video:

The specs:

  • 24.2MP APS-C (DX) Format CMOS Sensor
  • EXPEED 4 Image Processor
  • No Optical Low-Pass Filter
  • 3.2" 1,229k-Dot LCD Monitor
  • 1920 x 1080p 60/50 fps (only at 1.3x crop)
  • 1920 x 1080p 30/25/24 fps
  • 1280 x 720p 60/50 fps
  • Multi-CAM 3500 II DX 51-Point AF Sensor
  • Video: ISO 100-25600
  • Photo: ISO 100-25600 (Extended Mode: 51200-102400)
  • 6 fps Shooting for Up to 100 Frames
  • Built-In Wi-Fi Connectivity with NFC
  • 1/8" Headphone, 1/8" Microphone, HDMI C (Mini), USB 2.0
  • New Flat Picture Profile
  • In-Camera Time Lapse, Up to 9,999 Frames
  • Weight: 1.49 lb / 675 g
  • Availability: April 2015
  • Price: $1,200 Body Only, $1,700 with 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR Lens

More info on the video specs of the camera:

The EXPEED 4 processing power extends beyond still imaging performance to benefit full HD 1080p video recording in multiple frame rates up to 60 fps, with the added ability to record using just a 1.3x crop of the DX format for added reach while maintaining the full 1920 x 1080 resolution. During recording, fully manual control is possible over shutter speed and ISO settings, along with the ability to utilize Auto ISO adjustment in manual mode with a top sensitivity of ISO 25600. Zebra stripe highlighting can be applied to aid in controlling overexposure during recording, too, along with in-camera Picture Control profiles, custom tone curves, and a flat profile to benefit color grading applications. Recording to an optional external recorder is possible in order to gain uncompressed 4:2:2 8-bit output through the HDMI port and, when recording externally, use of the camera's LCD monitor for simultaneous live view monitoring is possible.

In regard to audio recording, an in-camera stereo microphone can be used or, alternatively, an input is available for utilizing an optional external stereo microphone. Sound levels can be adjusted across 20 levels prior to and during recording, along with the ability to monitor audio via the headphone output. Additionally, the D7200 is compatible with the optional ME-W1 Wireless Microphone for recording clear mono sound of your subject up to 164' away.

Videos focusing on specific features of the D7200:

Nikon D7200 Back
Nikon D7200 Side
Nikon D7200 Top

They have also announced a new wireless microphone that will retail for $250:

Record mono audio from subjects from up to 164' away with the water-resistant ME-W1 Wireless Microphone from Nikon. The ME-W1 uses Bluetooth connectivity, and includes a microphone, receiver, windscreen, audio cable, and a case. Stereo recording can be achieved by connecting the optional ME-1 microphone to the ME-W1.

Nikon ME-W1 Wireless Microphone
For more info and to pre-order, check out the links below.     

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Your Comment

15 Comments

A native iso of 25,600 might sound nice. But in theory wouldn't that mean that low iso images would be very noisy? Meaning that you would have to significantly ND when you go outside.

March 2, 2015 at 5:09AM

7
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Zachary Will
Cinematographer
970

When they say native here, they don't mean it the way that the a7s has (i think) a native ISO of 3200, it's a native range, so you can go up to 25,600 without using expanded settings.

March 4, 2015 at 9:50PM

0
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Again, a great camera from Nikon-Canon. If we were still living in 2012.

March 2, 2015 at 5:46AM

27
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Panos Karachristos
Director - Filmmaker
264

Right! 7 years (2008) after the release of the first DSLRs with video recording capabilities and Nikon-Canon are still at this point!

March 2, 2015 at 9:25AM, Edited March 2, 9:25AM

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Jupiter de la Bâtardise
writer/filmmaker
277

Nikon Needs to start making Cinema glass ..... The end

March 2, 2015 at 6:22AM

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Nigel Thompson
Director / Editor / Producer
251

"During recording, fully manual control is possible over shutter speed and ISO settings, along with the ability to utilize Auto ISO adjustment in manual mode with a top sensitivity of ISO 25600."

Sounds like you still can't change aperture in live view.

March 2, 2015 at 10:37AM, Edited March 2, 10:37AM

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nbd if you use old manual glass with an aperture ring, yeah?

March 4, 2015 at 9:51PM

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is it because Nikon gets their sensors from Sony they can't make a cinema dslr?
I don't understand their business model to not even try during canon's most handicapped position.
I like Nikon's color science a lot more than Canon's punchy- overly vibrant color.

March 2, 2015 at 12:58PM

6
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Vincent Gortho
none
1392

People on forums should go beyond spec sheet. This camera looks to have very good 1080p resolution, you know like all the oscar nominee film that where mastered in 2k!!!!!!!!!!!! The rest of it spec it would beat or be second runner up in spec if you take into account the latest Nikon Apsc cameras like the d5300. You get at least 12 stop DR, very good low light, no moire aliasing, very good codec even at 8bit 24 mbit with clean hdmi for high bitrate external recorder, good rolling shutter and and and..... gorgeous colours, mostly on skin tone. While most of the competion is deficient in one or the other of these characteristic. Where it is lacking if it is verified is if you have to quit recording to change aperture. Peaking also is a big minus but at least if you use lens with aperture rings and an external monitor you can solve those problem. The d5300 already was producing gorgeous imagery but was a little soft. It seems that Nikon has remedied this problem with the d7200.

March 2, 2015 at 3:38PM, Edited March 2, 3:38PM

12
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Even with the specs you just listed. It doesn't compete with other video dslrs or other cameras shooting video. I know, why not just buy one of those, right? Because Nikon is a big player in imaging capture. It's just saddening how they seem to have no enthusiasm in making something remarkable.
The image from these cameras feel like how they should of been when the dslr movement first started. By now they should be further down the road at least offering 10bit color with various bit rates.

March 2, 2015 at 7:29PM

0
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Vincent Gortho
none
1392

Better than canon t51 but not than my Sony a6000

March 3, 2015 at 8:57AM

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Nelson Reyes
Youtuber
72

This camera is not priced to compete against the GH4 or A7S, so for 1080 HD video it should be very good ( especially with full aperture control while shooting in LiveView mode ), and with no low-pass optical filter it should be stunningly sharp for still photos.

March 3, 2015 at 8:50PM

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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
31581

Is it avoiding line skipping by going to 1.3x crop? If so it's a smart move. Whatever they've done the video quality is certainly improved.

March 3, 2015 at 8:55PM

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Vidrazor
565

The D7200 is an APS-C camera with a 1.5x crop sensor. I suspect that this camera is doing pixel binning to reduce the sensor resolution without introducing aliasing or moire, just like the D5300 and D5500 cameras.

March 4, 2015 at 11:50AM

9
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Guy McLoughlin
Video Producer
31581

60fps slow-mo or 60fps?
One is useful, the other, not so much.

March 5, 2015 at 9:10AM

0
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