January 7, 2016

Tokina Introduces a Speedy Ultra-Wide: 14-20mm f/2

Tokina 14-20mm f2
Tokina is trying to cement their place as a contender in wide angles with the new AT-X 14-20mm f/2 PRO DX lens

The lens is designed to cover APS-C sensors, and will come in both Canon EF and Nikon F mounts. Though it's not a huge range, and Tokina makes an inexpensive 11-20mm f/2.8, the fact that this is an f/2 is insanely impressive, and it's a testament to improved technology that we're getting such fast lenses at wide focal lengths, with great optical performance. This is about as fast as you can get for a zoom, and while their are some super-fast Sigma lenses, nothing quite hits this wide and this fast. 

Here are more of the specs:

  • Canon EF or Nikon F Mount (APS-C/DX Coverage)
  • Aperture Range: f/2 to f/22
  • One Plastic-Molded Aspherical Element
  • Two Glass-Molded Aspherical SD Elements
  • Two Super Low Dispersion Elements
  • Multi-Layer Anti-Reflection Coating
  • Internal Focus; One-Touch Focus Clutch
  • Nine-Blade Diaphragm
  • Price/Availability: TBA

Instead of a physical switch between manual and autofocus, you pull down or up on the focus ring depending on what you're trying to do. This lens should also do a better job reducing flares, and it focuses completely internally, so there's no telescoping action. We don't have any word on pricing or availability yet, but I would expect this to be under $1,000 based on how inexpensive most of Tokina's other lenses are.      

Your Comment

19 Comments

Wow, this is gonna be a popular lens. Though I'm not sold on the AF/MF pull down feature, seems like that potentially leaves room for error while operating the lens. Of course, depending on how easy it is to push the ring up or down.

January 7, 2016 at 10:48PM

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Micah Van Hove
Writer
director, producer, dp

If it's as good as the other Tokinas I own (11-16 f2.8 II and the wonderful 28-70 f2.6-2.8) than you can't go wrong. I actually even prefer the older version of the system (used in the 28-70 f2.6-2.8), that requires the focus ring to be in a specific position to change modes, whereas in the more recent lenses you can switch in whatever position you are. There is some force needed to change push-pull the ring, so I don't think you'll accidentally change it.

January 8, 2016 at 4:02AM

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Good to know!

January 8, 2016 at 6:19AM

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Micah Van Hove
Writer
director, producer, dp

With a speedbooster and GH4, this is going to be a groundbreaker.

January 8, 2016 at 12:21AM

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Are we sure it would work on a speedbooster? Aren't Tokina's meant for cropped sensors already?

January 8, 2016 at 3:18PM

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Joseph Arant
Writer
410

the tokina 11-16 covered full frame in some focal lengths even though it was aps-c. this could do the same.

January 8, 2016 at 6:59PM

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Why does Tokina insist on manufacturing lenses with the AF/MF pull down feature? After so many complaint from users.

January 8, 2016 at 7:49AM

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Tommy Boy
Photographer
314

We have the 11-17 and haven't noticed any issue with the AF/MF pull push system. Does it get really loose after years of abuse?

January 8, 2016 at 9:50AM, Edited January 8, 9:50AM

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Josh.R
Motion Designer/Predator
967

I can't rest easy when using the AF/MF pull push system. When pushing it down to select MF I get the feeling I need to refocus. Why? Because the AF/MF mechanism shifts left to right giving the impression that one has lost focus. I find myself refocusing just to make sure.

January 8, 2016 at 10:53AM

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Tommy Boy
Photographer
314

I never saw that as a negative, since we usually use MF and if you ever switch you're obviously refocusing anyway.

January 8, 2016 at 2:57PM

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Josh.R
Motion Designer/Predator
967

Unless you are doing astrophotography, why not just stick with the new Sigma 20mm 1.4? With Tokina, you are stuck with an APS-C only lens...

January 8, 2016 at 3:19PM, Edited January 8, 3:19PM

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Joseph Arant
Writer
410

The difference between 20mm and 14mm is vast...

January 8, 2016 at 8:52PM

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No, because the Sigma is full frame and the Tokina is crop frame. In full frame parlance, the Tokina is 21mm at the 14mm end. The Sigma is also a prime lens, so unless Tokina pulled one helluva rabbit out of their hat, the Sigma should optically be a better lens.

January 9, 2016 at 12:49AM, Edited January 9, 12:54AM

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Vidrazor
674

Well, if you are considering either the Sigma 20mm or this Tokina, I must assume you have a crop body, either aps-c or super 35 sized (or smaller) - because it's pointless to think about this crop lens on a full frame camera.

So then, on a suitable camera body, the 14mm end of the Tokina is vastly wider than the 20mm of the Sigma. (I hope you are not confusing focal length with image circle - 14mm are always 14 mm, no matter the image circle the lens covers).

January 10, 2016 at 9:50AM

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The only think I'm considering is the FOV of the lenses relative to the sensor they're normally going to be used on. The Sigma will have a slightly wider FOV on a full frame camera versus the Tokina on a crop frame. That was my point.

If you're solely using a crop frame camera, obviously a lens like the Tokina is a viable choice. However the 14mm f/2.8 Samyang is a prime lens that works with both full and crop frame, and is probably a better candidate if you can live with the difference in aperture.

If you can live with one less stop the 11-16/20 Tokinas would also be ideal choices. If you really want to go wide than the 8-16 Sigma is a candidate, albeit a much slower one.

January 17, 2016 at 4:14PM, Edited January 17, 4:16PM

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Vidrazor
674

Agreed, buuuuuuuut you are seriously going to regret the purchase when you make the jump to full frame (as I did), and you could have had a lens that works for both. Furthermore, that extra light and sharpness will come in handy.

January 11, 2016 at 2:27PM

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Joseph Arant
Writer
410

Not true. They have a 16-28 f/2.8, 17-35 f/4, 24-70 f/2.8, 70-200 f/4, and 100mm f/2.8 macro full frame lenses. That said, the bulk of their innovation has been with wide-angle crop frame zoom lenses.

January 9, 2016 at 12:52AM, Edited January 9, 12:52AM

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Vidrazor
674

that 11-16 is still a go to for me after all these years

January 9, 2016 at 12:44PM, Edited January 9, 12:45PM

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Walter Wallace
YouTuber
1576

Sorry, grammar police: "while their are" >> "while there are". Feel free to delete this comment after fixing?

January 12, 2016 at 5:10AM

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