February 20, 2016

All the Music, All Year Long: Art-List Gives You Access to Their Entire Library for $200

You’re so close to finishing your latest brilliant video -- you just need to replace that temp track with the final music.

You need something nuanced yet epic, and with the quality of a symphonic Rachel Portman. Also, it needs to be licensed commercially. Oh, and did you mention you're on a super tight budget? Familiar with this quandary, filmmaker Ira Belsky co-founded Art-List, a new subscription-based music licensing platform for independent filmmakers, offering you all the music you want for a yearly flat fee.

Catering to the world of independent filmmakers constantly in need of music that's neither too MIDI nor too expensive, the subscription idea behind the Art-List sounds pretty enticing. Instead of a licensing fee per song, there is a yearly fee of $199 that gives get unlimited access to everything in the Art-List catalogue, which as of right now has around 1000 songs. Considering you can often pay $100 to license a single high quality song, this could be a great resource. And having a subscription based model with no restrictions on how (and how often) you can use the tracks is a winning proposition for video professionals who are regularly producing content that needs music.

Here’s Ira Belsky explaining why he's launching Art-List:

From Belsky:

There’s a lot of great music out there, but most filmmakers don’t have the budgets to license a lot of songs. So we decided to create a platform that would give filmmakers unlimited access to real, honest music that comes from working musicians, and making it available to everyone for an affordable price.

Unless you’re a one-man-band a la Robert Rodriguez (literally) who can compose and perform music yourself, you rely on the skills of musicians to bring your film to life. If filmmakers had the budget or time, it would be great to have music originally composed for every single project! But in lieu of that, it's nice to see a model that supports composers. It's worth noting that the other co-founder of Art-List, Asi Ayalon, is a musician and producer in the Israeli music industry. Here are a few profiles of some of the musicians who are creating tracks for Art-List.

If you want to check out Art-List for yourself, they are giving away 5 free songs between now and the official launch at the end of the month -- you get the free songs as WAV and MP3 files when you sign up for their newsletter. That's potentially five projects you won't have to scour the internet to find music for!

Art-list is set to launch at the end of February, so check out their site, get your free music, and keep an eye out on their model. If musicians who compose for film can earn a living, and filmmakers can get a constantly growing library of music all year long, it’s a win-win.     

Your Comment

11 Comments

Just collecting emails at this point. No free songs.

February 20, 2016 at 7:04PM

3
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TheTech Gorst
DP, Editor
88

I got the five free songs just now.

February 21, 2016 at 8:46AM

6
Reply
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Robert Bryant
Writer, Editor, Sound Designer
161

Submmited with a personal email and just got the songs now.

February 21, 2016 at 3:05PM

0
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TheTech Gorst
DP, Editor
88

Yo I need this site to launch right now!

February 20, 2016 at 9:35PM, Edited February 20, 9:35PM

17
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Terrell Lamont
Director, Director of Photography
450

This is exactly what I've been waiting for. I really hate paying 20€ for shitty songs, and other than contacting hundreds of artists privately for fees between 80-250€ (reasonable price), the only other option is services like Audiosocket which have great music but will set the license prices at 1000€ or more. This service will be awesome even if I end up making only 1 or 2 projects with their music per year.

February 20, 2016 at 11:43PM, Edited February 20, 11:43PM

0
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Sebastian Kammonen
Filmmaker
309

Are these terms the norm for music licensing?
From Terms of service Artlist.io
5.2. It is forbidden to use the Works, inclusive of as part of Projects, in context of violence, or encouragement of violence, pornography and abomination, racism, hate and discrimination against any person or based on race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, community or nationality, threats, hurting the helpless, violating privacy, slander and any other insulting contents. The Site reserves its full right to determine at its discretion whether a use of a Work constitutes a violation of this article and you hereby undertake to accept the Site's decision in this matter.

February 27, 2016 at 6:37PM, Edited February 27, 6:37PM

0
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TheTech Gorst
DP, Editor
88

So if there's any conflict or characters of undesirable nature in your film you can't use their music? Isn't that kind of the basis for a villain?

February 28, 2016 at 3:21AM, Edited February 28, 3:21AM

0
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Ryan Gudmunson
Recreational Filmmaker
891

I don't really understand how this works if I chose to end my subscription. Would all work using music from this site then have to be taken down after I ended my subscription?

February 27, 2016 at 8:32PM, Edited February 27, 8:32PM

15
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That is a good question Oliver. If we have to take it down or change it will be a deal breaker for me.

March 13, 2016 at 8:14PM

4
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Sammy3 Passamano
Director - DP in the making
81

I've noticed all of the promotional material is aimed at how inexpensive and awesome the music is for the film maker. What are the advantages of composing for a library like this? I'd be interested to hear how the business model is aimed at professional musicians who'd like to sustain an income. Best wishes, Anthony.

May 26, 2017 at 7:19AM

1
Reply

I use Soundstripe. Similar, but cheaper. http://soundstripe.grsm.io/ethanloomis

They're offering 10% off with code STRIPE10.

July 11, 2017 at 1:52PM

11
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Ethan Loomis
Videographer, Loomis Video
196