April 18, 2016
NAB 2016

Zoom Shows Off New Versatile U-44 and U-24 Mobile Audio Interfaces

Zoom U-44
Already a big player in the mobile audio game, Zoom has just released new low-cost, highly versatile interfaces for recording audio onto your favorite devices.

Filmmakers already know Zoom's recent audio recorders, the H4n and the H5, well; we at No Film School are using the F8 all the time. Zoom now has a new U family of audio interfaces for getting audio into your computers, phones, tablets, and more (note: these are not standalone recorders).

The U-44 Handy Audio Interface

ZOOM's new U-44

The U-44 includes both four inputs and four outputs and basically allows you to connect any sort of recording device ever made, including but not limited to whatever microphones, instruments, monitors, computers, or iPads you have in your arsenal.

  • Powered via USB or two AA batteries.
  • A 10-pin connector makes the U-44 compatible with all other Zoom products: the X/Y module, the Mid-Side capsule, the Stereo Shotgun—the U-44 can handle all of them, providing you with numerous options for recording yourself on the go.
  • Combo TRS/XLR inputs
  • A selectable S/PDIF connection (optical or coaxial)
  • MIDI support
  • Hi-Z capability 
  • Outputs so you can hook the U-44  directly to your monitors
  • $199.99

​The U-24 Handy Audio Interface

ZOOM's new U-24

The U-24 is essentially a smaller version of the U-44 that can fit in the palm of your hand. The major difference is that it's missing both the S/PDIF connection options and 10-pin capsule support, otherwise it still has all the great same low noise circuitry. It also features:

  • iPad compatibility
  • Bus-powering and AA-battery support
  • H5-series combo preamps
  • MIDI ins and outs
  • Hi-Z capability
  • Multiple monitoring options
  • $149.99

What do you think of the new interfaces?


No Film School's complete coverage of NAB 2016 is brought to you by My RØDE Reel, Shutterstock, and Blackmagic Design.

No Film School's complete coverage of NAB 2016 is brought to you by My RØDE Reel, Shutterstock, and Blackmagic Design.

More of No Film School's coverage from the NAB showroom floor:

An earlier version of this post misstated that these interfaces were "recorders"—they are not standalone recorders, but audio interfaces for computers/phones/tablets/etc.

Your Comment

5 Comments

Just to be clear, these are not recorders, as you imply in the first line. These are audio interfaces for your computer or iPad.

April 18, 2016 at 5:26PM, Edited April 18, 5:26PM

9
Reply

Well, unless I'm missing something, these aren't "recorders" in the sense that an H5 or an H6 is a recorder. These are recording interfaces that require a computer or tablet to work. Or do they work as stand-alone recorders too?

April 18, 2016 at 5:58PM, Edited April 18, 5:59PM

0
Reply
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Jesse Maxson
Videographer/Editor
74

Nope, we messed up in the madness of all we've seen at NAB—corrected. Thanks Elliot and Jesse.

April 19, 2016 at 2:24AM

3
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Ryan Koo
Founder
Writer/Director

I'm sure your brains are fried from new gear overload. Thanks for the update.

April 19, 2016 at 9:27AM

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Jesse Maxson
Videographer/Editor
74

These look interesting, and the MIDI support is handy.

But Zoom needs to get it together with their recorders. Noisy preamps and a sadly useless dual-recording mode need to be addressed immediately.

To elaborate on the dual-recording comment: Various recorders, like the Tascams, let you record a secondary set of tracks at a lower level; this is clipping protection. But, inexplicably, the Zooms don't let you use this on the XLR inputs (you can only use it for the built-in mics). So essentially, you can't use it with good mics. Or boom mics. Or whatever. Rather unbelievable.

April 20, 2016 at 8:44PM, Edited April 20, 8:44PM

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David Gurney
DP
2028