December 13, 2017
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Oscar Winners, Early Talkies, and Bruce Willis Join the National Film Registry

Now is the time to revisit Die Hard, Field of Dreams, The Goonies, andTitanic.

Cinephiles rejoice! The Library of Congress' National Film Registry today announced 25 new titles to join its prestigious ranks of motion picture artworks deemed of "cultural, historic and/or aesthetic importance."

Spanning the entire length of film history—this year's selections range from early 20th century (Interior New York Subway, 14th Street to 42nd Street from 1905) to early 21st (Christopher Nolan's Memento, released in 2000)—the films provide a great starting point for filmmakers and fans looking to obtain a fuller understanding of what cinema can be.

Stanley Kramer's 'Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?'

If that sounds too daunting a task, it shouldn't. Equally informative and accessible, the National Film Registry aims to preserve films through the National Film Preservation Act (eligibility requires a film to have been released at least 10 years ago).

The list now features 725 films of all kinds, including home movies, early silents, documentaries (including Spike Lee's 4 Little Girls), and Best Picture Academy Award winners such as James Cameron's recently re-released Titanic, now celebrating its 20th anniversary.

Phil Alden Robinson's 'Field of Dreams'

Carla Hayden, the 14th Librarian of Congress noted that "the selection of a film to the National Film Registry recognizes its importance to American cinema and the nation’s cultural and historical heritage. Our love affair with motion pictures is a testament to their enduring power to enlighten, inspire and inform us as individuals and a nation as a whole.  Being tasked with selecting only 25 each year is daunting because there are so many great films deserving of this honor."

Hayden will discuss this year's selections with film historian Leonard Maltin tonight on Turner Classic Movies for a special broadcast beginning at 8pm EST.

Below you will find the entire list and how to get started viewing them. 

James Cameron's 'Titanic'

The 25 films selected for 2017

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